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Get to Your Stand the Right Way by PSE’s Will Jenkins


By Will Jenkins

http://www.thewilltohunt.com/

Finding your way to stand can be difficult and planning your entrance is essential to a successful hunt. How you get to your stand is often overlooked when hunting and can prove to be a deal breaker on bagging that record big buck.

The shortest distance between your parking spot and your tree stand is always a straight line but the best way to get there never is. First you need an aerial map of the the property preferably with a topographic overlay so you can not only see what tree cover is there but also what land features are underneath. Many of us are guilty of going a certain way to a stand location or specific area of a property simply because we’ve hunted there for years and that’s how we’ve always gotten there. If you haven’t done it I guarantee you will change some trails after sitting down and marking stand locations on a map and really looking at the property.

Second, you need to consider the right wind for hunting that stand. If a stand is set to hunt on a North East wind, you will want to enter from the South West. You want to walk in with the wind in your face so your not blowing your scent all over the area you expect the deer to come from. This may mean you have to make a much longer walk or completely change the trail you take in.

Now that you’ve done a good job planning it you have to see what it really looks like. Maps are a great first draft of the trail but seeing what’s really on the ground will define your trail. Take your time and make a smart route to the stand keeping in mind that you hope to drag a deer out the same way. If you get in early and leave late make sure you do a good job of marking the trail. Even if you know the property well the first season using new trails in the dark it’s super easy to get turned around. I prefer reflective thumb tacks over neon color tapes.

Summer is the perfect time to plan and set up your new trails. It provides a good time to scout and get to know deer movement while improving your access. Also use this time to set trail cameras and clear your shooting lanes and you’ll more than ready to go by fall!

 

PSE Topo For Article

 

Will Jenkins is creator of TheWilltoHunt.com and Harnesses For Hunters. He’s an avid outdoorsman who enjoys sharing his experiences through his blog. He also writes for Bow Adventures e-Magazine and is a member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association.

Will lives in Central Virginia with his wife and two kids. He hunts in Virginia and Maryland but has dreams of heading west to hunt Elk and Mule Deer.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Hunting Ethics: Do We Need Them? by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson

How is ethics related to the world of hunting, and why as hunters is it valuable to incorporate into our way of thinking?

Let’s first discuss the HOW.

To understand how hunting ethics affect the hunter, let’s consider the definition.  According to Webster, “ethics” can be defined as follows:

 A system of moral principles; the rules of conduct recognized in respect to a particular class of human actions or a particular group, culture, etc.

There are not only written but unwritten rules of conduct recognized by the hunting community, which all play a role in the moral principles of hunting. The written laws are clearly outlined in each state’s rules and regulations and if they are broken there are obvious consequences, e.g., shoot something out of season with the wrong piece of equipment, and you may find yourself losing your license, paying a hefty fine, and wearing a new name of “poacher.”

Where the lines tend to blur and become a little gray is when we cross over and begin discussing the unwritten hunting ethics.  Sure, you may not be doing anything labeled illegal; however there still may be consequences.  It is this unwritten code of conduct that I actually think has a bigger impact on the hunting community if not taken seriously and ultimately can give a bad impression to the non-hunting community as well.
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Most of us as hunters have encountered a situation while out in the field that makes us a little uncomfortable, and we question whether what we just observed was ethical.  Deep down we know it may be wrong and it may simply be a battle to bite our tongue, move on and do the right thing.  For example, while hunting public land there is an unwritten code to not hunt on top of other hunters.  I understand that this may vary slightly depending on where you are hunting and how pressured a piece of public land is.

In my experience, I’m typically hunting in the mountains where there are plenty of entry / access points and not one trail head into an area.  Therefore, if you’ve gotten up early and beat everyone to a certain spot on the mountain or in the woods, you’ve earned the right to hunt that location.  Now you may be saying, “wait a minute…it’s public land and we all have the right to be there.”  Yes, I agree.  However, when there is an entire mountainside with several entry points, I’m not sure why you would park right next to someone and hike in on top of them.  It’s just rude. I understand that you might have heard a bugle and it sounded like a real elk, but it might be good to consider that either 1) it is the hunter in the truck you just parked next to, or 2) they are working a real bull and you just stepped into someone’s hunt.

Obviously there will always be exceptions and times when you simply can’t avoid bumping into other hunters in the field.  I would encourage us all to be aware of our surroundings, and if you notice you’ve crossed into someone’s hunt, back out graciously.  It is the ethical thing to do.
PSE_Archery_Emily_Anderson

As mentioned earlier, the unwritten hunting code of ethics can also spill over and have a negative effect on the non-hunting community if not taken seriously.  My challenge to all hunters is to always conduct themselves in a respectful manner while out in the field.  It means not leaving trash behind, respecting the animal by taking ethical well-placed shots, and even taking all your meat out of the field.  The list goes on.

I can attest that always striving to take an ethical shot can be challenging at times.  When you have an elk staring you down at 30 yards away and the shot presented is not ideal, it is decision time.  It takes every fiber in your being to make the choice of whether to shoot or not to shoot, and then you are left wondering after the moment passes whether you made the right one.

The #ELKTOUR DVD Season 1 has just been released which I was honored to be a part of last fall.  I was privileged to be able to preview the DVD in advance and got to relive the close encounters I had with elk last season.  While it was fun to watch and see our past hunt play out again before my eyes, I also had to witness one of these “moments.”  I made the decision to not shoot at the time through a small grove of aspens and after watching the video I found myself yelling at the screen, “SHOOT!”  However, the reality is I feel comfortable with my decision in the field.  Ultimately if the shot doesn’t feel right and I’m not comfortable taking it, bottom line is that I’m not going to release an arrow.  (If you watch this hunt, I bet you will have fun yelling “SHOOT!” right along with me.)

After digesting all of this, I’m left with the second half of my question – WHY is it important to incorporate hunting ethics into our way of thinking?

Ultimately, I think it is simply this … incorporating ethics into our hunting lifestyle reveals a portion of who we are as individuals and as a hunting community as a whole.  It encourages us to promote hunting in a positive light, realizing that our actions affect ourselves, fellow hunters, and the non-hunting community.  If we realize as hunters the importance of holding each other accountable to a higher standard, the idea of toeing the line somehow becomes less enticing.  My challenge to all of as hunters is to raise the bar to incorporate the best practice of ethical hunting into each hunt we embark on.

PSE_Hunt _Emily Anderson

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Trail Camera Strategies by PSE’s Will Jenkins


By Will Jenkins

http://www.thewilltohunt.com/

There’s been a surge in Trail Camera interest, technology and options in the last few years. I started using them about 3 years ago. Recently a few friends and readers have come to me with questions about where and how to set cameras up since they were new to the game. I have 3 major strategies to the placement of trail cameras and you can hybridize them and they can all overlap but each provide a little bit different information about deer movement and identifying where your deer are.

Travel Routes: If you’d like to see when and which deer are using the travel routes through your properties, this should be in your arsenal of camera placement strategies. Look for game trails, find major entry or exits into a field or where they are crossing a road and follow them into the woods a good ways. Put the camera about waste high 10 – 15 feet off the main trail. I try to let these cameras set for 2-4 weeks and take note of what animals are traveling the trails during what time of day.

Eight and Big Six

Fields/Food Source: Putting a camera on a field is great because the camera’s field of view is so wide and not restricted by trees and brush so you can see a large area. Strategically placing a camera in a field can give you a lot of information as to where the deer enter the field and at what times. With some of the ‘Plot Watcher’ cameras or cameras with a ‘Plot Watcher’ option like the you can really get a good idea of the activity on fields or plots in a time lapse style video. This could save you a lot of frustration when you hunt a well traveled trail that you think is a field entrance in the evenings but is a field exit and the deer won’t be there until well after shooting light or at dawn. Look for high traffic areas in the field or points in the field edge that are between any know bedding or staging areas.

Bait: Being in Virginia where you can’t bait during the season I use bait outside of the season to take inventory and get better quality pictures helping stop the deer in front of the camera and help draw some more deer into the area. Use bait when you can’t nail down a trail and the property holds little or no food source. It helps draw the deer to an common place for some good pictures and if you place the camera with some thought to where you think they are coming through it can help you further identify travel routes. For instance behind my house it’s a maze of thick areas and infrequently traveled trails with a few areas of sign. However there is also a creek and a couple of clearings. Both provide good visibility to where I think the deer are traveling. I put bait in the clearing and by the creek, faced the cameras so they have the most clear view of potential travel routes and hopefully when I check them this weekend I’ll have some good intel on the movement in the area.

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As I mentioned it’s easy to mix and match them, put a little bait on a travel route to give them a reason to pause for a picture or maybe bait a field edge before crops are planted to keep them interested in the area. This may be obvious to some but as a new comer it can be daunting to have one or two cameras and hundreds of acres worth of options. In comparison to many I’ve only been using cameras for a short time and these are the strategies that have worked for me. What are you’re strategies?

Will Jenkins is creator of TheWilltoHunt.com and Harnesses For Hunters. He’s an avid outdoorsman who enjoys sharing his experiences through his blog. He also writes for Bow Adventures e-Magazine and is a member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association.

Will lives in Central Virginia with his wife and two kids. He hunts in Virginia and Maryland but has dreams of heading west to hunt Elk and Mule Deer.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Will Jenkins-Keaton’s BC Bruiser


By Will Jenkins
http://www.thewilltohunt.com/

Keaton's Buck

Keaton’s Buck

PSE got word of a monster mule deer taken in British Columbia with a PSE so I tracked down Keaton and got the story Believe it or not this is only Keaton’s second deer with a bow! His first was a 2×2 and now his second buck is a pending record book mule deer with a green score of about 219″. Keaton killed this magnificent buck with his BowMadness MC in only his second year hunting. Now for the story!

Keaton started the day with the attempted stalk of 6 different 4 points, (east coasters remember this means a 4×4 or eight total points). After a quick lunch break he was back out and spotted a 2 point and decided to go after him and see what else might be traveling with him. After 20 minutes on the stalk the buck led him to an overgrown quad trail that Keaton continued down. After walking the trail and having a close encounter with a few does he spotted the two point at about 50 yards. He continued down the trail and after making it about 100 yards he glanced to his left and there he was, staring directly at Keaton. He drew his bow and back stepped about 10 yards to get a clear shot through the trees. He settled his 60 yard pin, released the arrow and the buck took off passed him. As he passed Keaton noticed blood running down his side and knew it was a lethal hit.

Keaton's Hunt

Keaton’s Hunt

After taking a moment to compose himself after some major buck fever he started to look for his arrow and the blood trail. Unfortunately he couldn’t’ find either as the hit ended up being slightly high to due to estimating the yardage a little further than it was, easy to do when a monster sneaks up on you! With no arrow and no blood trail he decided to look for sign of a dead deer. He noticed some crows circling not far away. As he arrived where the crows had been circling he again encountered the 2 point and two does. As they walked off he noticed a magpie fly up from the ground and there he was!

After 60 or more failed stalks this season, Keaton was rewarded with the opportunity at a true trophy animal and a buck of a lifetime. He was able to seal the deal using his PSE bow and not only get the trophy but create great memories of an amazing hunt and sharing the recovery with his friend Chris. Congratulations Keaton on an amazing animal!

Will Jenkins is creator of TheWilltoHunt.com and Harnesses For Hunters. He’s an avid outdoorsman who enjoys sharing his experiences through his blog. He also writes for Bow Adventures e-Magazine and is a member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association.

Will lives in Central Virginia with his wife and two kids. He hunts in Virginia and Maryland but has dreams of heading west to hunt Elk and Mule Deer.
 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Will Jenkins on Buying Online vs. Pro Shops


By Will Jenkins
http://www.thewilltohunt.com/

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The internet has changed the retail market and the hunting and archery industry is no exception. There are many deals to be had on the internet and while that may seem appealing please consider a few things before you click buy it now or send that paypal payment.

If you buy online you’re going to need your bow tuned. Even if the bow comes in your draw weight and length you still need to tune it and make sure it’s good to go. If you work on your own bow that’s a little different but it never hurts to have a pro shop take look at it. The key here is tuning isn’t free. So consider the cost of tuning at your local shop in addition to the deal you’re getting. If you aren’t sure what the tuning might cost check with your local pro shop. Conversely, most pro shops will tune any new bow purchased at no additional charge. So even if you’re saving $50 off retail for the bow but taking it to the pro shop to get it tuned is going to cost you $60, just go buy it right from them.

Also consider buying from your pro shop just to support a local business. Most pro shops are owned by the guy behind the counter who puts in a lot of hours. Plus, you’ll have the opportunity to shoot several bows and make sure you like a certain model before purchasing. I’m a big proponent of shooting what feels good to you and fits you. It all boils down to what you are confident with.

Pro Shop

Now, back to buying online. If you’re on a strict budget the internet can be ‘where it’s at’ so to speak. You can often find big discounts on models a year old or slightly used models from archery forums. This may not get you the perfect fit but it will a get a bow in your hands at a low cost. Even buying a bow a few years old can work out great just do your research on the seller.

The bottom-line, if you’re ready to spend some money and invest in a new or last year’s model bow, buy it at your local pro shop. If you can’t afford that, first check to see if your local pro shop carries used bows and skim the internet looking for deals that will get an affordable bow in your hands. If you are new to archery stick with the pro shop as much as possible!

Will Jenkins is creator of TheWilltoHunt.com and Harnesses For Hunters. He’s an avid outdoorsman who enjoys sharing his experiences through his blog. He also writes for Bow Adventures e-Magazine and is a member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association.

Will lives in Central Virginia with his wife and two kids. He hunts in Virginia and Maryland but has dreams of heading west to hunt Elk and Mule Deer.
 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Will Jenkins Says Don’t Stop Now!


By Will Jenkins
http://www.thewilltohunt.com/

Target Practice

Target Practice

Practicing that is! If you’re still toting a bow into the woods it’s likely you’ve been spending a lot of your spare time hunting rather than practicing. When really there’s no more important time to practice then right now for several reasons. If you haven’t had a very successful season have you even shot lately? Is your form staying consistent? After dragging your bow through the woods has anything shifted?

I’ll start with perhaps the one thing that is most likely to screw up your hunt if you aren’t currently practicing and it really doesn’t have to do with lack of practice. If you’ve been walking miles through the woods carrying a bow sending it up and down a pull rope from your tree stand or letting it bounce around in your truck things may have shifted. Even if you take every precaution before season tightening everything down to make sure it doesn’t move, it still can.

3D Practice Photo taken By Mark Huelsing

3D Practice Photo taken By Mark Huelsing

If there’s ever a time to practice on a 3D target it’s now. I don’t stand in the yard flinging dozens of arrows like I might do over the summer because my free time is a little short this time of year but I do try to put 5-7 arrows into a 3D target a couple of times per week. This makes sure that my form and my bow are consistent and I’m practicing shooting at the same target I hope to encounter in the woods. When hunting I don’t usually shoot more than one arrow, so I focus on making my first shot the best it can be and see how it ends up. I usually take my first shot at 20 yards because that is my most likely shot in the woods. Then I take a shot at 30, 40 and 50 yards then if time allows another shot back down at each distance back down to 20. So at most right there I’m sending 7 arrows out at varying distances and keeping check of my for the whole way.

PSE's Will Jenkins Tree Stand

PSE’s Will Jenkins Tree Stand

This quick practice a couple of times per week helps me ensure that my bow is in good shape, my form is consistent and it definitely helps my confidence when headed to the stand. I also try to mix in some shots from a tree stand in my back yard just to make sure that I’m still hitting where I think when shooting from elevation. While we’re heading into the end of the season, if you’re still carrying a bow to the woods it’s no time to get lazy and stop practicing!

Will Jenkins is creator of TheWilltoHunt.com and Harnesses For Hunters. He’s an avid outdoorsman who enjoys sharing his experiences through his blog. He also writes for Bow Adventures e-Magazine and is a member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association.< em>Will lives in Central Virginia with his wife and two kids. He hunts in Virginia and Maryland but has dreams of heading west to hunt Elk and Mule Deer.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Will Jenkins “Why I Chose the Vendetta”


By Will Jenkins
http://www.thewilltohunt.com/

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins Vendetta

The PSE line up is a big one with a ton of great bows. They are all unique and offer something slightly different but it can be overwhelming. So I took to the internet reading everything I could about the various bows. I like a decent brace height and ATA. I like bows to be forgiving and comfortable. Eventually I was deciding between the EVO 7 and the Vendetta. As a bowhunter I wanted something smooth. I like being able to easily draw my bow smoothly when hunting.

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins Bow

After reading as much as I could I decided the Vendetta was my best shot at a smooth bow with a good brace height and still gets some good speed with my short draw length. With no pro shops close by I’m usually limited by my research and while I’m a huge proponent of shooting what feels good to you, I got lucky on this one. Once my Vendetta came in I frantically called and texted my good friend Tim Johnson so we could get together to set my bow up. Tim is an ace with a bow and by the time he was done with my Vendetta, it was a perfect fit.

I picked the Vendetta for it smooth draw and it definitely delivered. I can’t get enough of shooting this bow it’s simply that good. The smooth draw and solid back wall make it easy to draw undetected and stay at full draw for a long time if needed. For those reasons I have it at around 65 pounds of draw weight. With the Vendetta’s draw cycle it barely feels like I’m drawing any weight at all and I can stay at full draw for a long time with little fatigue. While speed is good these are the most important factors to me as a bowhunter. Speed is great but doesn’t do much good if I can’t get the bow drawn and hold it there when needed.

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins X Force Vendetta

I outfitted my Vendetta with the Aries sight, PSE X 5 Arrow Quiver and an 8″ 9oz Vibracheck Omega Stabilizer. All the pieces come together nicely to make a great shooting bow. I’m extremely impressed with my 2012 Vendetta and can’t wait to see how the 2013 models shoot.

Will Jenkins is creator of TheWilltoHunt.com and Harnesses For Hunters. He’s an avid outdoorsman who enjoys sharing his experiences through his blog. He also writes for Bow Adventures e-Magazine and is a member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association.

Will lives in Central Virginia with his wife and two kids. He hunts in Virginia and Maryland but has dreams of heading west to hunt Elk and Mule Deer.
 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Will Jenkins Reviews the PSE X 5-Arrow Quiver


By Will Jenkins
http://www.thewilltohunt.com/

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins Quiver

I seem to get a different quiver every year. I started with an Alpine 5-Arrow quiver, but it was loud. I moved to the G5 Mag-Loc Quiver, while I like the magnet design sometimes it was a little too strong and the hood was too large. Now I’ve got the PSE X 5-Arrow Quiver, and can say that this will be on my bow for years to come.

First off, it’s a two piece design which I absolutely love because of the versatility. Depending on what I’m packing in my quiver is either attached to my bow or the side of my pack. To clip to the bow it easily rotates into place and is held in place rock solid. It has a low profile that makes it attach nicely to the bow and not put too much weight out away from the riser. Once in stand I either take it off my bow and attach it to my pack or hang it from a hook. The quiver has a metal loop in the design at the top that makes it very easy to hang up on the side of the tree, stand or pack.

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins X 5-Arrow Quiver

I’ve used fixed blade and mechanical broad heads this season and both fit nicely in to the foam inside the hood. As with any quiver or anytime I knock an arrow with a mechanical broad head I check to make sure they didn’t move or partially open in transport. The design of the bottom of the quiver does a good job of holding the arrows tightly without making loud popping sounds when placing arrows in the quiver or removing them.

PSE's Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins Reviews the PSE X 5-Arrow Quiver

Overall, I’m more than satisfied with both the look and performance of this quiver. It easily accommodates multiple arrows sizes as well as both mechanical and fixed broad heads. At retail price of $99 it’s not the cheapest on the market but it’s a solid quiver that will last a long time and look great on your bow.

Will Jenkins is creator of TheWilltoHunt.com and Harnesses For Hunters. He’s an avid outdoorsman who enjoys sharing his experiences through his blog. He also writes for Bow Adventures e-Magazine and is a member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association.

Will lives in Central Virginia with his wife and two kids. He hunts in Virginia and Maryland but has dreams of heading west to hunt Elk and Mule Deer.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Will Jenkins Basic Bow Maintenance & Care


By  Will Jenkins
http://www.thewilltohunt.com

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins Bow Maintenance

No matter the price of your bow it’s still an investment and it only makes sense to take care of the investment. The better care you take of your bow the longer it will stand up to the abuse of hunting.

Your strings and cables will break down faster than anything on your bow. Keeping them lubricated with string wax is important to their longevity. Some people put wax on every single time they shoot. Maybe I shoot too often but that just causes build up for me. I put wax on my strings ever 2nd or 3rd time I shoot. Make sure you use a decent brand of wax that is soft and after you apply it rub up and down the string with your fingers to warm the wax and incorporate it into the string.

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins Strings and Cables

There is also a lot of information out there on how often to change your strings and cables. Some people say you must change them every year while others say it’s not a big deal change them ever 3 or 4. It really all depends on the quality of the strings, how much you shoot and what kind of exposure they get. By exposure I mean do you leave it baking in the sun through a window most of the time or do you take it out in rain several times a year. If you shoot weekly or even daily you’ll need to change them sooner and the same if you bought the cheapest strings you could find. My recommendation is to start with quality strings. Personally I only use local custom string makers that I know and trust. However, there are a ton of reputable brands out there. With the amount I shoot and hunt I won’t let my strings go more than two years. Even if you don’t shoot much I wouldn’t go past two years on a string. Over time they can break down and stretch no matter how much or little you paid for them and can end up out of spec and you won’t even know it. For example I purchased a bow from a friend a few years ago. He warned me that he wasn’t sure but he thought the string was only a year old. The string looked brand new and the bow shot fine so I shot it for a couple months before putting new strings on it. Even though the strings were a decent brand and looked basically brand new they had stretched 3 inches! This was robbing the bow of proper performance. So in summation, don’t let your strings go for more than 2 years and if you are very abusive on your equipment every year is probably a good idea. I’d rather be safe than sorry!

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins String & Cable Maintenance

The axles only need to be lubricated infrequently. This means whenever you have your strings changed make sure your bow technician lubes it up and you’re good to go. If you plan to hunt in the rain wipe it off as soon as you’re done and you can even apply some string wax to hardware that may be prone to rusting prior to going out. The only other consideration is storage. While bows are durable if exposed to intense heat such as being left in the car on a hot summer day the limbs can delaminate and cause permanent damage. I personally keep my bow in the house on a hook in my closet. Lastly, do not dry fire your bow.

Hopefully those few tips will help your bow last for years and years to come!

Will Jenkins is creator of TheWilltoHunt.com and Harnesses For Hunters. He’s an avid outdoorsman who enjoys sharing his experiences through his blog. He also writes for Bow Adventures e-Magazine and is a member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association.

Will lives in Central Virginia with his wife and two kids. He hunts in Virginia and Maryland but has dreams of heading west to hunt Elk and Mule Deer.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Will Jenkins Starting the Season Off


By Will Jenkins
http://www.thewilltohunt.com/

Will Jenkins

Rob with Velvet

This year I was super excited to start my hunting season as I was starting it a whole month earlier than I ever had. I had several invitations to hunt in Maryland so I took advantage of those invitations and started hunting on September 7th. Maryland’s season doesn’t usually open until September 15th but they opened earlier this year. With Virginia always starting in October I’ve never really had the opportunity to sit in a tree stand when it was in the 80’s. It was hot but a good time! While I didn’t fill a tag on opening day my friend Rob who I was hunting with tagged a very nice 8-point in full velvet as well as a doe. I couldn’t have been more excited for him! The other great thing about hunting Maryland this year is they have opened quite a few Sundays for hunting. Hunting on Sunday in Virginia is still strictly banned while in Maryland they have started to open certain Sundays in specific counties.

Will Jenkins

Will Jenkins Backstrap

The following week I was able to kill what I thought was a small doe but ended up being a button buck still in velvet. The shot wasn’t great due to a pesky spike that kept chasing the deer off. As I was squeezing the trigger he lunged at the button buck causing him to lurch forward as I was shooting making a less than perfect shot. With and arrows covered in a little blood and a lot of gut along with no blood trail I came back the next morning. Within about 45 minutes of looking I found him piled u and the meat was still good! However, in my race against rising temperatures I didn’t get a chance to snap any trophy pictures before he was in the cooler.

The Virginia bow season opened on October 6th. I’ve gotten access to a new property by my house as well as the same properties I had last year. The deer density is nothing like it is Maryland. Hopefully this year I will actually be able to kill a deer in Virginia! Right now my hit list is pretty scarce. I’m not a huge trophy hunter but if he steps out I’ll send an arrow his way! I’ve gotten pictures of some decent little basket 8 point bucks, but I’ve also gotten pictures of a monster 6 point that is huge. Talking to people in the area no one even knew he existed and I’ve never gotten a picture of him during the day time so hopefully he’ll slip up during the rut!

Will Jenkins

Will Jenkins Big Six Side View

So that’s how I’ll be kicking of my hunting season. I hope to follow this post with several successful hunts with some great images of deer falling to a PSE bow!

Will Jenkins is creator of TheWilltoHunt.com and Harnesses For Hunters. He’s an avid outdoorsman who enjoys sharing his experiences through his blog. He also writes for Bow Adventures e-Magazine and is a member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association.

Will lives in Central Virginia with his wife and two kids. He hunts in Virginia and Maryland but has dreams of heading west to hunt Elk and Mule Deer.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


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