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Trail Camera Strategies for PSE Bowhunters with Glenn Eilers


PSE Bowhunter

PSE Bowhunter

Editor’s Note: When Glenn Eilers of Shelbyville, Kentucky, discovered PSE bows 8 years ago, he decided he’d found a bow that was made for him. He’s been able to use PSE bows to take some really nice whitetails.

I believe our trail camera strategy is one of the reasons we can keep up with our bucks so well, and determine how, where and when to take these bucks. We put out 40 trail cameras on both pieces of property that we hunt at the first of July to inventory our deer herd and to try and determine which bucks may be potential shooters. As the bucks’ antlers grow, we can tell if they’re expressing the genetic characteristics of the bucks we photographed the previous year. Then we can tell if the bucks we passed up last year still will be available for harvest this year. We’re trying to cover about 4,000 acres and not only determine what bucks we’ll have to hunt at the opening of bow season, but also where these bucks are traveling. Once we find four or five really good bucks that we want to hunt, then we may take down a lot of the other trail cameras we have out. If we’ve located the bucks that we want to harvest at the first of bow season, we may remove our cameras out of the woods and not put them back up until about 2 weeks before bow season arrives.

One of the reasons we don’t have to leave our trail cameras out the entire months of July and August is because we have quite a few food plots planted. Generally the deer will be hidden in the food plots. Once they establish trails going to and from the food, they’re happy, and they’re usually not going to change their routes of travel. When we go in 2 weeks before the season to put our trail cameras out again, we’re also picking the trees where we’ll hang our tree stands and determining the wind direction we must have to have to hunt from that stand. We’ve learned from our camera surveys that some of the bucks are super stars. For whatever reason, they love to be in front of the camera. Other bucks are much more shy. You’ll never get them right in front of the camera, but you’ll see them on the outer edges of the pictures.

Another important ingredient that we believe helps us to be successful growing and holding big bucks is that we don’t hunt our property during gun season. This way, we’re creating a sanctuary for older bucks from surrounding lands, where they’ll have plenty of food and little hunter disturbance. This tactic usually pays off best in the late season, after the gun season has ended in both Kentucky and Indiana. We allow the gun hunters to drive the older age class deer onto our property during gun season, and we’ll have an opportunity to take those bucks after gun season is over. When we go into the woods, we’re either checking our trail cameras or attempting to take bucks with our bows.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Glenn Eilers Tells About the Buck That Vanished


Glenn Eilers

Glenn Eilers

Editor’s Note: When Glenn Eilers of Shelbyville, Kentucky, discovered PSE bows 8 years ago, he decided he’d found a bow that was made for him. He’s been able to use PSE bows to take some really nice whitetails.

In 2009, I had good trail camera pictures all summer long of the buck I planned to take that year. However, when he rubbed the velvet off his antlers, he vanished. I finally caught up to the buck in November where he was about 1/2 mile away from the place where I’d seen him all summer. I still could get trail camera pictures of this buck. But, after studying pictures from several different locations, this buck didn’t seem to have an established movement pattern. The way I finally caught up to this buck was I noticed he’d come into an area where does were bedded down. Then he’d use his nose to try and determine if a doe that was coming into estrus was in that bedding area. So, I set up my portable treestand downwind of the bedding area and waited on the buck to arrive. I had seen this buck the year before, and he would’ve scored about 150 then. But, I could tell then by his body size and his rack that he was only about a 3 year old deer. After I harvested my deer in 2008, I continued to try and keep up with this deer with my trail cameras to make sure he made it through gun season.

During gun season, we don’t hunt our deer with guns, but instead, let our property be like a sanctuary. When gun season was putting a lot of pressure on the bucks around our property, they could find food and sanctuary on our property. When I saw this buck in the winter of 2008, I didn’t get a reflection from the deer’s left eye on my trail camera pictures. So, I knew he had an injury on his left eye. Once I finally took this buck in November of 2009, his left eye was damaged, and I don’t know whether it was from a buck fight or not. As a result of having his left eye damaged, his left antler grew a couple of extra points on it. He scored in the 185 range, and I took that deer with my PSE Bow Madness.

Tomorrow: Glenn Eilers Explains the Buck He Took While His Cameraman Filmed

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


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