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Bow Madness premieres PrimeTime tonight at 9pm CST on Outdoor Channel!


Bow Madness premieres PrimeTime tonight at 9pm CST on Outdoor Channel

Bow Madness premieres PrimeTime tonight at 9pm CST on Outdoor Channel!

With mean PSE rigs, guts and every ounce of skill they have, the Drury Outdoors Team makes a mad dash across the continent to put a Rage in the cage and a buck in the back of the truck. These episodes hit hard and fast as the arrows we sling, and you get to sling some too. One of our fans’ hunts per week will air during the I Shot It With My PSE segment. At the end of the season, all of America will vote on their favorite, and the winner takes home a new Dream Season Edition HuntVe 4×4 electric UTV. It’s archery-only, adrenaline-always. With some of the best bowhunters on the planet.

Outdoor Channel Monday 5 p.m. CST, Wednesday 12:30 a.m. CST, Thursday 9 p.m. CST

 


PSE’s Terry Drury Says to Make Sure You Have Time to Set Up on Turkeys


Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note: PSE has asked nationally known outdoorsman Terry Drury to give us his tips and tactics for taking a wild turkeys with his PSE bow.

The only way you can know for sure where to set up your ground blind and your decoys is to locate the turkey ahead of time. You can do this by either finding his roost site before you hunt or see him out in a field or some type of open area before you hunt him. Once you see where the turkey should be, look for a spot where you can set up your ground blind and your decoys on the morning you want to hunt. Give yourself time to reach that place, get the blind set out and brushed in, the decoys set out and then be in the blind long before the turkey can see you. I believe that having the proper set up is 90 percent of what’s required to take a turkey with a bow. Be careful to not set up your decoy and blind, so that as soon as a turkey comes up out of a valley or a ditch he sees the decoy and the blind. Because then he’ll think, “What’s that? I’ve never seen it before. I’m out of here.” If possible, I prefer for a turkey to see the decoy and the blind when he’s out at 100 to 200 yards away. Then he won’t be startled. That’s why I like to set up around field edges, logging roads and young clear cuts, where the turkey can see the set up from a long way off. If the turkeys are close and gobbling really well, but we know we can pick up our blind and decoys and move 50 or 100 yards away without spooking the turkeys, we’ll often do that to get better video footage of turkeys coming in from a long ways off. If a turkey’s gobbling well, and we feel we have time to back up and make a better set up for a bow shot, we may move from 50 to 150 yards away from the turkey to make sure that bird has plenty of time to see the decoys and plenty of time for us to see him.

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Terry Drury’s Funniest Turkey Hunt:
One of the funniest turkey hunts that Mark and I have ever had, was when we were hunting turkeys in timber without a ground blind. I was sitting against a tree, and Mark was sitting against another – about 5 feet from me. Mark was the shooter, and I was running the video camera. But the way the gobbler came in, Mark was unable to get to full draw on the turkey. The turkey kept coming and walked right between Mark and I. We were so well camouflaged in our Mossy Oak, that the turkey never saw us, although he was only 2 feet from me and about 2 feet from Mark. This gobbler was really big, and we had to let him walk off. That bird just out turkeyed Mark, and me too.

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Terry Drury Says Don’t Forget to Check that Your Arrow Will Clear the Window


Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note:PSE has asked nationally known outdoorsman Terry Drury to give us his tips and tactics for taking a wild turkeys with his PSE bow.

Because I shoot from a chair when I’m hunting out of a ground blind, I want to make sure that when I aim at a turkey and release the arrow that the arrow won’t hit any of the sides of the window from which I’m shooting, if I’m shooting through a vertical window. If I’m shooting through a horizontal window, I need to look through my pin sight, aim at the decoy and see if the arrow will hit the bottom of the window. I may have to move my decoys to make sure I can get arrow clearance once I shoot. You also can put your turkey vest, your boots and/or your daypack in your seat and then sit on them. That should make you high enough to get arrow clearance.

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Terry Drury’s Calling Tactics:
Yesterday I told you how to call in a gobbler that had a flock of hens with him. But, sometimes, you’ll call in a flock of turkeys that has more than one gobbler in the flock, and all the gobblers may be longbeards. For instance one of the gobblers may be a dominant gobbler, and the other two birds will be subordinate gobblers. So, when Mark and I see there’s more than one gobbler in a flock, we change our calling strategy. Instead of trying to call in the dominant hen like we do when only one gobbler is in a flock, we start calling aggressively to the gobblers to attempt to pull one of those three longbeards out of the flock. So, knowing which turkeys in the flock you want to call to and to talk to when a flock of birds is coming to your decoy is very important to your success.

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

When the turkeys come in, you’ve got to look for a place to put the arrow. One of the worst shots to make is when a gobbler’s facing you, and you try and shoot him through the breast. A better shot is to wait for that gobbler to turn broadside to you and place the arrow about 3 inches back from the crease in the turkey’s wing. Or, if the turkey’s in full strut, wait for him to turn away from you. Put the arrow right at the base of his tail feathers in the anus area. That way, you can make the draw without the turkey seeing you, and your arrow will go through the vitals. But, Mark and I both prefer to take broadside shots, if we can get them.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Terry Drury Says to Make Sure You Have Time to Set Up on Turkeys

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Terry Drury Says to Always Have a Ground Blind When You Bowhunt Turkeys


Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note:PSE has asked nationally known outdoorsman Terry Drury to give us his tips and tactics for taking a wild turkeys with his PSE bow.

A ground blind gives you so much more opportunity to move your bow, without being seen, than if you don’t use a ground blind. When you get ready to come to full draw, you can make that move much easier, and the turkey’s much less likely to see you, when you’re in a ground blind. I like a total concealment ground blind, and Big Game Treestands just has come out with a new total concealment blind that I’m really like. Too, Mark and I have five new prototype blinds that we’re testing this turkey season. These new blinds have blackout on one side of the window curtains, which means you can leave the blackout side down for several days or weeks. Then the turkeys get accustomed to seeing those black spots in the blind.

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

When you roll the windows up, the inside of the blind is black, so the turkeys don’t see any difference in the way the blind appears with the windows down or the windows up. But, the windows are also reversible, so that if you prefer, you can have the camouflage side of the curtains facing out. These blinds from Big Game Treestands have vertical windows, which is much better for archers than horizontal windows are. I also like a total concealment blind, which enables you to stay out of the weather and breaks the wind. Too, you can move around in a ground blind, without the turkey seeing you. The blinds I hunt out of are big enough for a video camera and a cameraman, besides me. Another element I believe is important when you’re using a total concealment ground blind is to brush up the outside of the blind. We’ll put limbs, bushes and brush all around the blind, so the turkeys don’t just see a flat piece of material. When we go to a spot where we know there’s a turkey, we try to get there an extra 30 to 45 minutes early, so that we not only have time to set up the ground blind but also have time to brush up around the outside of the blind. You don’t have to spend a whole lot of time brushing up your blind, since once the turkey sees and focuses on the decoy, he’s really not that interested in the blind. This is one of the reasons you can use a pop up ground blind on a turkey, with a little bit of brush around it, and be ready to take that turkey. But, when you’re hunting a deer from a ground blind, you may have to leave that ground blind set up for a week or more and really brush up good around it.

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Terry Drury’s Calling Tip:
One of the toughest turkeys to take with a gun or a bow is a gobbler with hens. Often instead of trying to call the gobbler, we’ll forget about him and start calling to the boss hen in the flock. If she starts yelping and yelping aggressively, we’ll yelp even louder and more aggressively than she is. We’ll start calling on top of her calls, before she finishes those calls much like when a lady’s talking to a group of other ladies, and another lady in the group starts talking, while the first lady’s talking. That tactic usually makes both the ladies and the hens mad. We’re trying to make that hen so mad, that she wants to come over and scold us. If she starts coming toward us, we pour on the heat, calling louder and more aggressively than she’s calling. Then we can get her really mad by doing plenty of cutting and cackling. Wherever that boss hen goes, the rest of the flock, including the gobbler, will go. So, we allow that boss hen to drag the gobbler and the rest of the turkeys right in to our decoys and into bow range.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Terry Drury Says Don’t Forget to Check that Your Arrow Will Clear the Window

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Terry Drury Says to Check Your Range of Motion When Bowhunting Turkeys


Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note: PSE has asked nationally known outdoorsman Terry Drury to give us his tips and tactics for taking a wild turkeys with his PSE bow.

One of the things you always have to remember, when you’re using archery tackle to take turkeys, is that the turkeys don’t read the same books, articles, webpages and blogs that we hunters do. Many times, a tom turkey will do just the opposite of what he’s supposed to do. If you’re a left handed shooter, you’ll want to swing the bow to your right to aim at the turkey, and you’ll have a difficult time swinging your bow to your left, if a turkey comes in on that side to where you are. A right handed shooter easily can swing his bow to the left, but oftentimes has trouble swinging it to the right. So, when you’re sitting in your blind in a chair, you want to line up your butt and your feet, so that you can make that swing, easily and comfortably. Hopefully, you can set up to be in the right position to take the best shot when the gobbler arrives. I like to have my feet planted toward the left. Then I can swing my bow toward the right and be lined up perfectly to take the shot. Always practice drawing and shooting, before the turkey gets to the decoys. Then you’ll know you can get in the proper position to make the right shot, when the gobbler comes in, because turkeys rarely do what they’re supposed to do when they’re supposed to do it.

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Terry Drury’s Calling Tip:

I’m often asked how I call to a turkey, after I’ve set up my blind and set my decoys out. Mark and I believe in taking a turkey’s temperature right off the bat. Our technique of calling is best illustrated with a ladder. We like to start calling on the lower rungs of the ladder, with soft calling, low calling, soft yelps and some clucking and purring. If that turkey’s ready to breed, he’ll fire back immediately with a gobble. If he’s got hens or another gobbler with him, he usually won’t gobble back immediately. If the turkey is really gobbling well and starts coming toward us, we’ll probably call a little bit louder and somewhat more aggressively. We want to get that gobbler excited, so that he doesn’t get distracted or become uninterested. When that turkey is at 30 to 50 yards from the decoy, we start soft calling, purring on our M.A.D. calls and scratching the leaves. Or, perhaps we’ll give the sound of a turkey’s wing beating the ground. However, we mostly use soft clucking and purring to bring the gobbler within bow range.

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Also, remember to be patient. Don’t try and call too much. Watch the bird’s body language, and don’t rush the shot. If that turkey comes running in and is really locked in to your decoy, don’t call any more. Instead prepare to draw, and shoot, because that bird has bought what you’re selling. When he gets to your decoys, you need to be ready to collect him.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Terry Drury Says to Always Have a Ground Blind When You Bowhunt Turkeys

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Where to Put Your Turkey Decoy to Bowhunt with PSE’s Terry Drury


Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note: PSE has asked nationally known outdoorsman Terry Drury to give us his tips and tactics for taking a wild turkeys with his PSE bow.

One of the most critical elements for successfully harvesting a gobbler with a bow is decoy placement. I like to have the decoy 12 to 18 yards from my stand site. Depending on the time of the year, and whether you’re using a strutting gobbler decoy, a half strutting decoy, a jake or a hen decoy, I believe that the decoy either can help you or hurt you. But, the decoy always has to be really close to your blind when you’re bowhunting for turkeys. You have to take the turkey’s temperature to determine his emotional level at the time you’re hunting him to decide which decoy seems the best for hunting that particular turkey, that day. For instance, if you put a big strutting decoy out early in the season, and you call a gobbler in to where he can see that decoy, and that gobbler comes running in, then you’ve got the right decoy for that gobbler that day. However, if you put that big strutting decoy out in front of your blind, and you see that gobblers are shying away from him, then you may want to change decoys and use a decoy in half strut or use a jake decoy. Also, the heads of those two decoys generally aren’t as brightly colored as the head of a strutting decoy is. These more subordinate looking decoys often will lure in a gobbler that the full strut decoy may run off. During the peak of the breeding season, you may want to just use a hen decoy, perhaps one that’s squatted. Just make sure a gobbler can see that squatted hen decoy. So, learning to use your turkey decoys to match the time of the breeding season and the mood of the turkey you’re trying to take is very important to your success when you’re bowhunting toms.

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Although you may be able to shoot accurately out to 40 yards, you still want that decoy to bring that wild turkey in as close as you can get him to your blind. That turkey gobbler may look as big as a lion, when he’s in full strut coming across the field. But remember that the vitals on a turkey are very small. The gobbler’s breast may look large, however, if you don’t put that broadhead in the vital area, there’s a really good chance that you will lose that turkey. Remember, if a turkey will come in within 30 yards of a decoy, then more than likely, he’ll come within 18 or 20 yards of the decoy, if you’ll just be patient. If you’re using a hen decoy, the gobbler may move in from behind her. But, if you’re using a jake, a half strutting or a full strut gobbler decoy, the turkey may come in side stepping toward the tom’s head. On a calm day with very little wind, the gobbler may circle the decoy and then try and flog the decoy.

Really, I don’t worry too much about which decoys to use, because I’m usually either hunting with Tad Brown or my brother, Mark, and I just use their decoys. We use the Flambeau decoys that are flocked. Often we’ll use a full strut decoy the first week and put the fan of a turkey we’ve harvested before in the back of that decoy, to make the decoy look more realistic. Then, after that first week of turkey season, I may use a half strut decoy, a jake decoy or a gobbler decoy that has a head that isn’t brightly painted and therefore looks more submissive. During the peak of the season, I’ll use a mounted hen decoy made by Hazel Creek. I bowhunt turkeys with my Dream Season EVO, a Rage turkey broadhead and PSE Bow Madness arrow shafts.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Terry Drury Says to Check Your Range of Motion When Bowhunting Turkeys

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Terry Drury: Why he shoots a PSE bow


Terry Drury with Drury Outdoors explains why he shoots PSE.

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Terry Drury Talks About Persistence



Terry Drury with Drury Outdoors Talks About Persistence

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Terry Drury – The deer that got away


Terry Drury with Drury Outdoors speaks about the deer that got away!

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


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