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The Cure for Post Season Withdrawl by PSE’s Al Quackenbush


By Al Quackenbush

www.SoCalBowhunter.com

February is typically a month where we feel deprived of hunting. There is a void in our lives as not too many are out actually hunting, but more so just thinking about it and how they can’t wait for deer season to roll back around. Even for me it can be a tough time of year to get out, but with turkey season rapidly approaching getting into the woods to scout is key to success. A major plus is that while scouting areas for turkey in California you can also hunt coyotes or hogs year round so bring your bow and arrows when you scout, too!

Target Practice

Target Practice

Practicing should be a year round activity. Just because the snow is falling or there isn’t any hunting season open doesn’t mean you should hang up your bow for the next few months. Stay sharp year-round by practicing year-round. I am fortunate to have good weather and an outdoor archery range open throughout the year. This year I plan on also setting up a small target in my garage to allow me to shoot a few arrows every day just to keep my body fluid.

Bring a friend out scouting and introduce them to the wild! Another good way to get people interested is to take some of that hard earned venison and whip up a nice meal. Have some friends over for a venison feast, swap stories and share the wealth. You would be surprised at how many guys want to go hunting after tasting some steroid-free meat!

Bring a GPS…and be sure you are up to date with the current versions of software. Land may have changed hands, public land become private or vice versa. By bringing a GPS into the field you can mark different areas to review in the comfort of your home and give you exact locations for when you head back out to hunt.

Scouting

Scouting

Two more items that are a must when I scout are my binoculars and my camera. A good pair of binoculars like my 10x42s are great for scouting because they are powerful and I don’t mind the extra weight when it comes to optics. I want good quality, power and reliability (just like my compound bow). I also bring a camera along to document areas, things I find on the ground, and any animals I might see. It’s also a great way to document your trip to show your hunting buddies or your family.

So, if you get out there to do some early pre-season scouting or are fortunate enough to get some hunting in share your experiences and photos on the PSE Facebook page. We would all love to participate in your progress, excitement and all around success!

Albert Quackenbush has been bowhunting for more than 29 years. He shares his adventures on his blog, www.SoCalBowhunter.com and also writes for Bow Adventures e-magazine. He is a PSE Staff Blogger and a Pro Staff member for Piranha Custom Bowstrings and Field Logic. He is a member of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, California Deer Association, and is a Life Member of the North American Hunting Club.

Albert was born and raised in New York State where he learned to hunt everything from squirrels to whitetail deer. He lives in Southern California with his wife and daughter and hunts year round.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

 


An Archer’s Morning by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson

Blog: http://www.fromthedraw.com/

AnArchersMorning1.29.13

Carrying bow in hand and arrows in the other, the archer journeys through the open field.  An established target lays waiting along a well worn path.  The archer doesn’t want to miss the moment.  She makes an appearance briefly each morning, nods and slips away after illuminating the land with glorious stretched out rays.  Each new day is introduced in morning splendor as she swings her lantern of light across the horizon.  She is making her way, evidenced by the surrender of darkness, so the archer quickens his step.  Dawn is drawing near and the archer will be there to greet her.

The rhythm of the draw, aim, and release is mesmerizing, which somehow pauses the spinning of the world as an arrow slices through the crisp clean air.  Fingertips begin to grow numb as Jack Frost makes an appearance, but Dawn’s soft golden rays greets the archer with a kiss simultaneously as the string is anchored to lip’s edge.  The favor is returned as glistening rays dance off the tip of the arrow now slicing through the thin veil of breaking light.  The dance continues.  Anchor.  Breathe.  Aim.  Release.

Morning is now chasing Dawn across the prairie, threatening to snatch up her golden rays as the sun inches higher in the sky.  The brilliant rays of first light has done it’s job and pierced through the archer’s heart.  Dawn’s tranquility has swept by, leaving an archer in an open field thankful for another day.  Through the peep hole of a bow sight, the archer winks and watches as she introduces the day gracefully.  She winks back and slips away with a promise to return to catch the next arrow in flight.

The archer gathers arrows and journeys on, ready to face the day with the promise of Dawn coming again.

AnArchersMorning2.1.29.13

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Building friendships through bow hunting


By Albert Quackenbush
Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Glassing

It’s a rare event when I want to crawl back into bed on a hunt morning, but today was one of those days. I was just plain tired and the bed felt super comfortable, plus it was 2:00 AM on a Saturday. Fortunately, I snapped out of it quick because while it may have been early, it was time to bow hunt!

Brett and I made it to the trail head at 4:15 Am, which was exactly the time we wanted to arrive. There was a 3/4 moon, so we got to do something I have never done before; hike into our spot by moonlight. Our headlamps remained off on the nearly two mile journey into our destination. We were both happy that the temperature was 46 degrees as that made our hike in much more enjoyable. After dropping Brett off, I made my way to my glassing location, which was a Ridgeland that gave a spectacular view of the valley below. Sunrise wasn’t until 6:30 AM, but the moon was so bright that I was able to start glassing the ridges at 5:45 AM. It was amazing!

Albert Quackenbush

Brett glassing a distant hillside for deer

Sharing public land with rifle hunters is something every bow hunter must do. On this particular morning, the rifle hunters were out in full force. Around 7:00 AM, I received a text from Brett that he had spotted some does on a ridge. Quickly picking them out through my binoculars, I waited to see what they would do. As they walked down a trail, all they needed to do was turn right and they would be in bow range for Brett. They had other plans and turned left.

Hunter safety is something I am passionate about in my bow hunting seminars. In the state of California, it is not mandatory for any deer hunter to wear blaze orange. When archery and rifle seasons coincide, I am always wearing some sort of orange to let other hunters know where I am. Forty-five minutes after sunrise, Brett informed me that another hunter was near his location and had no idea he was there. Brett and I were both wearing blaze orange hats and this hunter had absolutely no orange on. I watched as the hunter took the ridge I was glassing from and started to hike it right toward me. I made the decision to stand right up and make sure he noticed me. Not only did I not want to be mistaken for a deer, but I also wanted him to know that I was hunting this ridge. He finally noticed me, turned around and stopped near Brett again. He then noticed Brett, waved and found another position. It was a tense situation because we didn’t want any confrontation nor did we want anyone shooting in our direction.

Albert Quackenbush

Deer on the nearby ridge

We glassed and waited patiently for a buck or a doe to walk into range. After two hours of waiting, a shot rang out in one of the canyons. I watched four doe take off from where the shot came from. Anticipating them running up the ridge I was on, I got ready. Like the two does from earlier, they went the other way. Within the next few minutes, we watched as four other hunters met up with the shooter. By his actions, we could tell he had a buck down. Brett made his way over to my location and we glassed the canyons as the hunter’s field dressed their deer. Seeing nothing, we hiked into an adjacent bowl.

We hiked and glassed and hike some more. We ran into more rifle hunters and still had smiles on our faces. Why? We were bow hunting and having a great time being in the great outdoors. As we made our way through drainage I spotted a forkie shed. It was a great reminder on why we were hiking our tails off.

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush found Small forkie shed in drainage

The weather was perfect, but the deer were nowhere to be found. We did find another hunter taking a nap under a shaded bush. We chatted with him for a few minutes and then continued hiking. Beside the other hunters, we soon realized we were not the only predators in the forest. Right in the middle of the trail we found these mountain lion tracks that had been made that morning. It gave us an uneasy feeling, but the worst part was the cat had decided to head right into the area we were headed. Now all bets were off as we turned back to find a shaded spot to relax for a couple of hours.

Albert Quackenbush

Mountain lion track

The evening hunt was a bust, but on the hike out it was evident that both Brett and I enjoyed the day. Breathing in the fresh air, burning boot rubber, and seeing some beautiful country while bow hunting made it a great day. All in all, we encountered eleven rifle hunters throughout the day. Not a single one of them had a stitch of orange on. I encourage all of you bow hunters to be safe out there and to try to anticipate situations you will encounter. No matter what, have fun and be safe out there!

Albert Quackenbush has been bowhunting for more than 28 years. He shares his adventures on his blog, www.SoCalBowhunter.com, and also writes for Bow Adventures e-magazine. He is a Pro Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com, Piranha Custom Bowstrings and Field Logic. He is a member of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, California Deer Association, and is a Life Member of the North American Hunting Club.

Albert was born and raised in New York State where he learned to hunt everything from squirrels to whitetail deer. He currently resides in Southern California with his wife and daughter and hunts year round.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


How do you know which eye is dominant? – Q & A w/ PSE’s Bobby V


Bobby V brings in PSE Pro Staff Chuck Cooley to answer a question about how to determine eye dominance.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Tips on Target Practice By PSE’s Albert Quackenbush


By Albert Quackenbush
www.SoCalBowhunter.com

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Target Practice

Practice for the extreme if you want to down an animal with one clean shot. What do I mean by that? A few years ago, I was out scouting a month before the season and at 6:00 AM it was 89 degrees. At 6:00 AM!! Imagine what it would be like at 2:00 PM. Here the temperatures during hunting season can easily reach 100 degrees midday. It gets hot, you get sweaty and uncomfortable and you need to prepare yourself for it. Also, you really should practice at ranges you aren’t so comfortable with. Shoot out further and you’ll be surprised at how your accuracy will change at closer range. Here are steps I continually work on throughout the year when I am practicing to prepare myself for the extremes.

In the early part of the year you will find me practicing in shorts, a t-shirt and sneakers when I am at the range. It helps me loosen up and it’s comfortable! The same should go for you. Start off the year practicing in your comfortable clothes, no matter where you are. Make it enjoyable. As the weeks tick by, I will add more clothing during select sessions at the archery range. On some hot days (80+ degrees), I’ll clothe myself in my long-sleeve, long pant gear. I’ll wear my hunting boots, too. Why do I torture myself like this? Hunting in the high desert could mean shooting a deer when it’s 90 degrees. You really should practice in those extreme situations. I have also had clothing get tangled into my bow string and throw off my shot. Wear what you plan to hunt in from time to time and you’ll find instances like this that can be corrected early on.

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush 3D Practice

Sometime during the next few weeks I will add in a 3D target to the mix. While you can start with a regular target with dots to shoot at, in the field you won’t have a bulls eye to focus on. Buy a 3D target and practice with it as much as you can. For me, I shoot at a small javelina target. Have I ever hunted javelina? No, but the target area is very small and it leaves little room for error. I could try to pick up a moose target, but I want my shots tight and my confidence level as high as it can be. If you hunt deer exclusively, pick up a quality deer target. My shots greatly improved when I started shooting a 3D target.

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Target Practice Tips

Want to add some more fun to your target practice? Take an old sock and fill it with rags or more old socks. Prior washing optional! The more you stuff in the better the result will be. Once you have six or eight in, tie off the end with a knot. Success! Now you have yourself a small rabbit target to use at the range. Then, tip one of your arrows with a judo point made for small game hunting. Start shooting at the rabbit a few times during each session. Keep track of your range and how you improve over time. You might surprise yourself how confident you will become and how far out you can hit that small bundle of socks.

Keep in mind that you must also prepare yourself for failure. Without failure there can be no improvement. Even after 28 years of experience with archery I still miss my mark once in a while. I am not perfect and I have bad days at the range, too. Just a few weeks ago, I was shooting with my friends and we were shooting at sixty yards with deadly accuracy. During our round of six arrows each, I drew my bow, settled my pin, and let the arrow fly. Immediately I knew it was off the mark as I felt he bow torque in my hand just as I released. My arrow went right over the 3D target and buried itself in the thick grass behind it. Was I dejected? You bet I was! How had I missed? No matter what I thought, I had to stay positive. It was what I did next that mattered most. Instead of beating myself up for missing, I went back to shooting and focused. I found my anchor point, settled the pin, squeezed the trigger on my release and buried an arrow deep into the vitals of the javelina. My practice session ended where it should have – on a successful shot.

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush

In closing I have one very important tip to ensure continued success. Once your arm gets tired, stop practicing. You can make bad judgments followed by avoidable mistakes if you continue to push yourself. Instead, go rest or pack up and prepare yourself to come back another day. I had to learn the hard way and now whenever my arm gets tired I am done. Remember that when shooting at an animal it is the first arrow that is the most important, not the last.

Albert Quackenbush has been bowhunting for more than 28 years. He shares his adventures on his blog, www.SoCalBowhunter.com, and also writes for Bow Adventures e-magazine. He is a Pro Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com, Piranha Custom Bowstrings and Field Logic. He is a member of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, California Deer Association, and is a Life Member of the North American Hunting Club.

Albert was born and raised in New York State where he learned to hunt everything from squirrels to whitetail deer. He currently resides in Southern California with his wife and daughter and hunts year round.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Dustin Jones Practice Techniques


Dustin Jones
http://www.highcountrybowhunter.com/

Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones Practice

We have all heard the saying “practice makes perfect.” While I believe this to be true, I feel like there is more to practice than just practice itself. Shooting your bow often will help strengthen the muscles that are being used as well as building the muscle memory. Now don’t get me wrong, this is all good practice but here are a few ways to become a better archery hunter.

1. Set Up in Different Scenarios

Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones Sister in law

As nice as it would be to always have an animal come in at 20 yards and stand there broadside with nothing between you or them, let’s be honest, it doesn’t always happen. Set Up several different realistic scenarios in which you think you might get a shot. When I am spot and stalk hunting for deer or elk, I need to use the trees, rocks, or sagebrush for cover. I try and recreate some of these situations by setting up my target and actually trying to sneak up on it and draw while trying to stay covered then slowly peek around and place an accurate shot.

2. Shoot How You’ll Hunt

Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones brother Travis Archery Shoot

this is one that I strive to focus a lot of my attention. There are different times of the year that you hunt which requires different clothing. This is why I practice often so as the seasons change, I will know how I shoot with certain layers on. Now building the muscle memory and being consistent in your form won’t change, but you may find that one extra layer could be getting hit by the string as you shoot so you need to add a shooting sleeve over that layer. It will feel different when you have a hunting pack on. There have been plenty of times when hiking in with my pack on I get an opportunity at an animal. By practicing with my pack on I have the confidence knowing I can make that shot.

3. Just Breathe

 Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones brother Kevin

Controlling your breathing is the most challenging aspects of hunting. I have troubles controlling my breathing no matter if it is a large bull elk or a whitetail doebut getting a handle on this will help you tremendously when the moment of truth comes. So how do you practice controlling your breathing? That is a really good question. What has worked for me is I sometimes do a light jog just to get my heart rate and breathing up then try to get it under control. Granted it’s not exactly the same but feeling your heart beat faster and breathing rate go up then try and shoot has helped me.

4. 3-D Archery

Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones 3-D Archery Shoot

I enjoy shooting traditional flat face targets, but some of the best practice is shooting 3-D targets. I am a member of my local archery club and they put on several 3-D archery shoots throughout the year prior to hunting season. This is a great way to practice and see where you should be aiming on certain animals indifferent positions. I would highly suggest getting a 3-D target to practice with and set it up in different scenarios.

These are some things that have helped me become a better archery hunter. So yes practice does make perfect, but it matters how you practice. Don’t do it for the sake of practicing. When you are out there, make it worth your time and have fun. I may look funny sneaking through my yard just to shoot a 3-D target, but it sure is a blast!

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.

Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


2013 PSE FleX Cable Slide Technology


PSE FleX Cable Slide Technology

2013 PSE Technology – FleX Cable Slide

PSE FleX Cable Slide Technology

  • Uses the same technology and manufacturing process as our PSE X Technology limbs for outstanding durability
  • Reduces lateral load by 30% for decreased torque at full draw
  • Adjustable offset allows cable clearance using different size arrows and fletchings

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

2013 PSE Technology – FleX Cable Slide

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Very Enticing..


By Albert Quackenbush
SoCalBowhunter.com

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Bow Practice

Four years ago I purchased my first PSE compound bow. It was a 2006 PSE Vengeance. I spent time researching this used bow and found the details to be very enticing. When I met the seller at his house, we spent a great deal of time discussing the bow. Being a lifelong bowhunter himself, he asked that I shoot the bow in his driveway before I purchased it. The fit and feel was just right for me. The draw was smooth, the weight in my hands was perfect and it shot like a dream. The price couldn’t be beat. I made the purchase knowing I had found the right bow for me, but that wasn’t always the case.

One of the biggest challenges I faced growing up was finding the right bow. When I first started shooting a compound bow it was because my dad bought it for me. I shot it often and loved it because he gave it to me, not really thinking about anything else.

Due to lack of knowledge and understanding, I have shot many different bows during my archery career. The most dramatic and hard lesson I learned was when I was 16 years old. I had outgrown my first compound and had to upgrade. My dad took me to a local pro shop to look at some used bows. We could never afford to buy a new one, which I was completely fine with. Just being able to bow hunt was incredible itself.

Once inside the pro shop, we noticed the owner reviewing a bow a gentleman had just brought in to sell. It looked like a great bow and my dad wanted me to try it out. It was selling for a great price and it was within our budget. This is a common mistake made by new bowhunters. They make an impulse buy and later, after shooting it and realizing their mistake, falter and get discouraged.

Albert Quackenbush

Now please understand I do not blame my dad or anyone else. There’s no blame here. It’s a misunderstanding and lack of knowledge. We did not know that you could shoot a few bows, try them out and see which one fit. It felt like we were inconveniencing the pro shop owner by taking our time looking, so we jumped at the chance to buy the used bow. Sure, I shot it (it was a difficult draw) and the bow was way too heavy for my 16 year old frame, but the price was perfect. So we bought it.

For the next two years I shot this bow with my confidence as low as one could imagine. It had no let-off, was heavy and although I was fortunate to take a couple deer with it, I really disliked the bow. With the same tactics as previously described, I went out and bought a new one.

My point in all of this is don’t buy a bow just because it’s on sale or that you think looks cool. Actually take some time to shoot it. Be sure it fits you so that you will own it for a very long time.

I have moved on from that first PSE to other PSE bows because they just fit me even better. I shot a PSE X-Force for years before upgrading to my current PSE Bow Madness. This is a great bow for me and is hands down the best bow I have ever shot. It fits me like a glove, shoots exceptionally well and is quiet. PSE is a company I trust and will be shooting for a very long time.

Albert Quackenbush has been bowhunting for more than 28 years. He shares his adventures on his blog,SoCalBowhunter.com, and also writes for Bow Adventures e-magazine. He is a Pro Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com, Piranha Custom Bowstrings and Field Logic. He is a member of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, California Deer Association, and is a Life Member of the North American Hunting Club.

Albert was born and raised in New York State where he learned to hunt everything from squirrels to whitetail deer. He currently resides in Southern California with his wife and daughter and hunts year round.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


The 2013 PSE Videos Are Here!


youtube.com/psevideo

youtube.com/psevideo

We just loaded our 2013 PSE videos to our YouTube.com Channel! There are videos on PSE bows, cams and PSE technology. Go and take a look! www.youtube.com/psevideo.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


The 2013 PSE Consumer Catalog is here!


2013 PSE Product Catalog

2013 PSE Product Catalog

Come and take a look at what PSE has brought you in 2013! http://bit.ly/psecatalog.

Pre-order from your local PSE Dealer!  Click here to find a dealer near you!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


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