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In 2013, PSE Now Offers Color Dampers!


2013 PSE Color Dampers

2013 PSE Color Dampers

PSE is now offering our popular line of damping accessories in colors. Allowing for customization of each bow, each piece is durable, effective and gives a custom look without a custom price. Color kits allow for a total bow “makeover” , individual pieces allow for splashes of color or the ability to have multiple colors on the same bow. Our new limb bands require no bow press and are easily attached to solid or split limb platforms!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


2013 PSE Custom Colors are here!


DESIGN YOUR OWN CUSTOM BOW!

2013 PSE Custom Bow Colors

2013 PSE Custom Bow Colors

Monday, October 1st, we are launching our 2013 PSE Product line! Pre-order from your local PSE Dealer! Here are our custom colors for the year! Lots of surprises to come! :)

Jon Shepley and the engineers at PSE spend a great deal of time designing our bow line each year. They do everything possible to offer a wide selection of bow options that will satisfy the needs of most archers. But, there are customers who need or want something a little different. What if you want a special color that we don’t offer in our catalog? That’s why we created the PSE Special Service Custom Shop. Through our Custom Shop you can let your imagination run wild. Using the multitude of existing components, the Custom Shop can possibly make a one of a kind bow,  just for you.

Important Note:  Not all desired configurations will be possible and always remember our catalog offerings are designed by our engineers for optimal performance.

Are you looking for that special color for your compound bows? We now have many colors to choose from.  Colors will vary from run to run and are available only for Compound bows.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Albert Quackenbush – Proud Bow Hunter


By Albert Quackenbush
SoCalBowhunter.com

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Target Practice

Hunting has been in my family for as long as I remember. My dad and brother are the two best hunting partners a guy could ask for. We would spend all year discussing the previous year, the weather, where to place stands and when October would arrive so we could get in the woods. Sure, we hunted for small game and turkey, but the animal we most desired was the whitetail deer. I took it for granted, until I moved 3,000 miles away.

Where I grew up in New York State everyone hunted. When I moved to California that all changed. It was a new place with new friends who didn’t understand hunting. Then married a woman who doesn’t care for hunting, but she appreciates the passion I have for it. I am a proud bow hunter and I am not afraid to share it.

I have actually made some great new friends through bow hunting in California. Some of the guys are my new bow hunting partners. Every week we hit the archery range to practice and talk about the upcoming archery seasons and what we can hunt. I look forward to it each and every week.

Now that my daughter is three and a half, I have started sharing more and more of the outdoors with her. I have never hidden the fact that I hunt, nor will I be ashamed of it. Sometimes, when I am watching a hunting show on television, she’ll hop on my lap and point out the animals onscreen. It makes me proud to know she knows the animals and sees the hunters in pursuit of wild game.

When I get home wearing camouflage face paint, she often jokingly asks me if I am wearing makeup. Of course I reply that indeed I am!

Al Quackenbush

PSE’s Al Quackenbush Teaching his Daughter to Shoot

Just recently, my daughter and I ventured to a sporting goods retailer and we picked out her very first bow. While I was introduced to archery when I was nine, I figured she could start earlier if she wanted to. Sure, she’s not going want to focus on it for more than five minutes, but she should have fun and shoot some arrows like her dad if she wants to. Enthusiastically, she said that she wanted the bow and also loved seeing all of the taxidermy around.

The next day, we got her bow out of the package and she shot for the first time. Like most kids, she was frustrated at first. With a little patience and coaxing, she was shooting arrows and smiling in no time. You can bet that I will be sharing more bow hunting tips and techniques as we both age gracefully.

Albert Quackenbush has been bowhunting for more than 28 years. He shares his adventures on his blog, SoCalBowhunter.com, and also writes for Bow Adventures e-magazine. He is a Pro Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com, Piranha Custom Bowstrings and Field Logic. He is a member of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, California Deer Association, and is a Life Member of the North American Hunting Club.

Albert was born and raised in New York State where he learned to hunt everything from squirrels to whitetail deer. He currently resides in Southern California with his wife and daughter and hunts year round.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE Introduces the PSE Staff Bloggers


PSE Staff Bloggers

PSE Staff Bloggers

September 10, 2012 Tucson, AZ – Precision Shooting Equipment, Inc. (PSE), a pioneering company in the archery industry, announces the selection of the PSE Staff Bloggers for blog.pse-archery.com.

“We are very honored to have assembled such an outstanding team of bloggers to represent PSE,” said Blake Shelby, PSE Director of Marketing. “Their dedication to DIY hunting, family and bowhunting will be represented in their posts.”

The PSE Staff Blogger Team consists of the following:

“We are excited to welcome them to the PSE family and look forward to reading their posts,” said Jonathan Shepley, President of PSE. “We believe they will be an asset to our industry with their tips, strategies and insights into bowhunting and archery.”

About Precision Shooting Equipment, Inc.

Pete Shepley, a legend in the archery industry, founded PSE 41 years ago. Today, PSE is one of the largest privately-owned archery equipment manufacturing companies in the country and a leader in development and manufacturing of the most advanced compound bows and related equipment ever produced.

For more information about PSE, visit www.pse-archery.com  or read their blog at http://blog.pse-archery.com.


Choosing equipment for ASA and ISO Tournaments – Q&A with PSE’s Bobby V ft Nathan Brooks


Elite TEAM PSE Pro Staff Nathan Brooks talks with Bobby about his bow setup for the ASA and IBO Tournaments.

Come and visit us at www.pse-archery.com or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/OfficialPSEArchery.


How to Prepare for an Archery Tournament – Q & A with PSE’s Bobby V


PSE Pro Staff Scott Starnes drops in and talks about preparing for archery tournaments.

Come and visit us at www.pse-archery.com or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/OfficialPSEArchery.


Why Curtis Goettsch Came Back To PSE


Curtis G

PSE’S Curtis Goettsch

Editor’s Note: Curtis Goettsch of Elkader, Iowa, has several reasons for loving PSE.

By 2006, I had evolved as a bowhunter and had started shooting tournament archery. I changed bows, because another manufacturer was producing a bow that I hoped would not only be a better bow to hunt with but also be better for tournaments. I was shooting in the Bowhunter Class and had become a Mossy Oak Pro. During that time, Mossy Oak and PSE had partnered on several different projects, and I was ready to change bows again. I didn’t really care which bow I shot, as long as the bow could help me be a better bowhunter and a better tournament archer. So, I tested a lot of different bows that were on the market in 2011.

The dealer at the archery shop where I worked had a PSE Dream Season EVO and asked me to try it. I really didn’t like duo-cam bows, since they all had a hard break-over when you hit the let-off point in the draw. However, the EVO had a smooth draw, almost like a single-cam bow. I really couldn’t believe how smooth the draw was. I was also excited about moving up to a faster power performance bow, so the speed and the smooth draw of the PSE Dream Season EVO really got my attention. I was shooting a lot of 3D archery at that time, and I felt that to be competitive, I needed a faster and a better performing bow.

PSE's Curtis Goettsch Bows

Precision Shooting Archery – Compound Bows

I had talked to a lot of people in the bowhunting industry. I also talked to the guy who owned the bow shop, who had shot the PSE Dream Season EVO all winter long and had decided that it was the best bow PSE ever had made. So, with that kind of recommendation, and having shot the bow, I made the decision to go with the PSE Dream Season EVO. During the summer of 2011, I shot my PSE Dream Season EVO in the Bowhunter Class at 3D-archery tournaments before the hunting season arrived. I really feel that’s one of the best ways to break in a new bow – participating in 3-D archery tournaments – so when bow season comes in, you and your new bow are the best you possibly can be. I won my first 3D-archery tournament with the PSE Dream Season EVO. That was really exciting for me, because I never dreamed I could shoot well enough to win a tournament. At the tournament I won, there were 186 archers in the bowhunter class. When I won that tournament, I was feeling really good about my decision to shoot PSE, and I was really excited about the performance of my PSE Dream Season EVO.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Eric Grippa Wins the 2012 IBO World Championship with his PSE Omen Pro!


Eric Grippa – 2012 IBO World Championship Winner MBR Class

My name is Eric Grippa, and I am a PSE Pro-Staffer from a little town just east of Cincinnati OH.  I have been competing in the IBO for the past 16 years, and this year at the World Championships in Seven Spring PA, it all finally came together for me.

The bow I shoot 3-D with is the Omen Pro.  I shoot it for one reason, sheer speed.  The Omen Pro is hands down the fastest bow I have ever shot.  I shoot a 29” draw at 58 lbs of draw weight.  With that set up, my Omen Pro sends my 300 grain arrow down range at 349 fps.  Needless to say, that makes yardage estimation much easier to call.  The class I shoot in is Male Bowhunter Release, which means I shoot fixed pins.  At almost 350 fps, I no longer have to hold a pin high or low on the target.  I judge the target for the top, middle, or bottom pin, hold the pin of my choice on the 11 ring, and let her rip.  That tactic enabled me to take first place this year at the IBO Worlds.  My Omen Pro and I made it to the finals with a comfortable lead.  I maintained my lead through the finals and came off the mountain as a World Champ.

Eric Grippa with his PSE Omen Pro

Eric Grippa with his PSE Omen Pro

I hear a lot of people comment on how they think the Omen Pro has to be very critical or hard to shoot.  In my 2 years of experience with the Omen Pro, I simply don’t find that to be the case.  As long as I maintain good form and follow through, which should be done with any bow, it shoots very well.   And I now have the belt buckle to prove it.

Thanks PSE for making such a fast, great shooting bow.

Eric Grippa
PSE Pro Staff


Mike Hopkins Shoots a PSE Supra HP for Tournament Archery and a Dream Season EVO When Hunting


Mike Hopkins Archery

Mike Hopkins Tournament Archery

Editor’s Note: Thirty seven year old Mike Hopkins of Junction City, Kansas, has been shooting a PSE bow since 2008. Hopkins is a classic example of how to become a better bowhunter. Mike decided to shoot 3D archery just before he took his first buck with a bow. As you’ll see, Mike consistently has been able to take more animals and a wider variety of animals, since he’s incorporated 3D archery into his bowhunting program.

PSE: What bow were you shooting in 2011?
Hopkins: I was shooting a PSE Supra HP. My PSE rep had told me how great the Supra was, and he encouraged me to try one. He let me take his bow home for a few days to practice with, so I’d have a better understanding and a better feel for the bow. He allowed me to set his bow up with my equipment, and I was really impressed with that bow. After shooting the bow, I decided that the Supra was one of the best bows a person could shoot in tournament archery, and in five out of seven national tournaments, I was on the podium to receive an award and a check. I won the Augusta, Georgia, shoot for my division, and I finished second in the Shooter of the Year competition in the Known 45 division. I gave the rep back his bow, but he helped me get one of my own.

PSE: What bow were you hunting with in 2011?
Hopkins: Last hunting season, I decided to try the Dream Season EVO. There had been a redesigning of the risers on this bow, and the improved design of the riser and the improved design of the limb pockets in this new bow made it a step up bow in the Dream Season line.

PSE: Why is it so important to you to shoot the newest PSE bows on the market?
Hopkins: I don’t necessarily have to shoot the latest and the greatest bow that PSE comes out with every year. When I choose a bow for tournament archery or for bowhunting, my first concern is, “Am I comfortable shooting this bow?” Just because a new bow comes on the market doesn’t mean that new bow is suited for every archer in America. That’s why PSE brings out so many new bows each year, and even has a custom shop if you want a custom bow built. Because PSE knows that different people like various types of bow configurations, the company offers a wide variety of bows that can fit almost anyone and will be comfortable for almost anyone to shoot. But since I’m on the PSE Pro Staff, I feel I have a certain responsibility to at least try the new bows that are brought on the market, and if they fit me and my style of shooting, I step up.

As a tournament archer, I’ve got to make sure that if I step up to a newer bow, it actually helps me shoot better than the bow I’ve been using. If it doesn’t, I’ll stay with the bow I feel most consistent with, and the same is true when I choose a hunting bow. I’ve got to make sure if I’m shooting a new hunting bow that it fits me, I feel comfortable shooting it, and that I have confidence shooting it. So, I don’t just shoot the latest and greatest, because it’s the latest and greatest. The new bows have to help me improve in both tournament archery and bowhunting, and if they do that, then I have no problem laying my old bow down and picking up my new bow. I feel that if I don’t have confidence in the new bows that PSE brings to the marketplace, then I can’t tell other bowhunters why they should consider one of PSE’s new bows if they want to step up. I really believe that I need to be shooting the bows that I’m talking about and promoting. I’m not going to shoot a bow or promote a bow that I don’t have confidence in and haven’t tested to know how it performs and why it performs the way it does. That’s the reason I shot my PSE rep’s Supra before I committed to owning one. There was no point in me getting a Supra, until I had tested it and knew it would help me shoot more accurately. The same is true of the Dream Season EVO.

Mike Hopkins Pro Staff

PSE Pro Staff Shooter Mike Hopkins

PSE: Where did you hunt last season?
Hopkins: Last year I moved to Augusta, Georgia, to go to military school. I didn’t move until October, but I went to Florida in September, and my boy and I got to do some hog hunting. We each took a hog in Florida with our PSE bows. My son’s hog weighed right at 100 pounds, and I shot three hogs, two that were 50 60 pounds and one that we didn’t find the last day we were hunting. The fella we were hunting with found it a day or two after our hunt, and he said it weighed 180 185 pounds. I was experimenting with a couple of different broadheads, while we were hunting in Florida. I used the G3, the Grim Reaper and the Spitfire. I felt, for my type of shooting, the Spitfire was best for me. I like the Spitfires because they’re very simple. By that I mean, those broadheads don’t have as many moving parts. They’re expandable, with a good cutting diameter, and when I’ve shot animals with the Spitfires, the blades haven’t broken nor the arrows. The blades deployed on impact, and one of the other broadheads’ blades didn’t deploy. The reason I mention the hog hunt is because I didn’t take a whitetail with my bow last year.

PSE: Mike, let’s recap for a minute. The only reason you started shooting 3D archery was because you’d gone 4 years without taking a buck deer, and you’d missed several. You were a hunter who was using the sport of 3D archery to become a better bowhunter. Now, you’re primarily a 3D archery shooter and go hunting when you can. How did this change take place?
Hopkins: I really like the competitive aspect of 3D archery. I can’t really say that I hunt any more or less than I used to, but I have drastically increased the amount of tournament archery I shoot, mainly because I have more opportunities all year long to shoot tournament archery. Bow season has a very limited time frame. The law stops me from bowhunting all year long, but no one can prevent me from shooting tournament archery all year long. So, I discovered that I had a lot more opportunity to shoot my bow by both bowhunting and shooting 3D archery than I had when I only bowhunted.

PSE: If you have to make a choice of whether to go to a 3D archery tournament or bowhunt, which do you pick?
Hopkins: Fortunately, I haven’t had to make that choice yet. If I had to make that decision, the animal I had the opportunity to hunt, and where I had the opportunity to hunt would be a major factor in which way I would go. To me, part of the excitement of bowhunting is visiting different parts of the country, seeing various types of terrain and hunting under different bowhunting conditions. I’ve hunted in the swamps of Louisiana, the deserts of Texas and the hills of Tennessee and many other areas. The opportunity to go to a new place, a new state and a different type of terrain will make choosing to go to a tournament really tough.

PSE: What types of tournaments are you shooting right now?
Hopkins: I’ve just moved out to Kansas, and I’m primarily shooting state tournaments right now. I haven’t shot any national tournaments since I’ve moved here, and I’m primarily shooting the Known 50 class. I’ll only be here for a year or two, so I may not be able to shoot the national circuit, but I’m not giving up tournament archery. When I move again, if I can get back to the southeast, I’ll be right back into shooting national tournaments.

PSE: What’s a major reason that you advise bowhunters to shoot tournament archery?
Hopkins: A bowhunter who’s been shooting tournament archery knows his limitations and his equipment’s limitations, because of how well he’s been able to shoot in tournaments. There’s no question of, “Can I make the shot, or should I not take the shot?” If you’re honest with yourself, you find out for sure what those limitations are through tournament archery. So, when a deer comes in and presents a shot, you already know whether or not you can make that shot.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Georgianna Braden Says Women Archers Are Welcome in Hunting Camps


Ladies in Archery

PSE’S Georgianna Braden

Editor’s Note: Georgianna Braden of Houston, Texas, is a petite, pixie like lady. You’d never consider her as one of the top female archers, if you saw her on the street or in the courtroom. She is not only a tournament archer, but also an avid bowhunter and an advocate for women’s archery. Georgianna, who’s been shooting a bow for 7 years, and her husband Michael are both members of the PSE Pro Staff.

Georgianna, how are you accepted when you go into a hunting camp with all men or maybe only one or two ladies?
Braden: All the guys are super friendly. They understand that I’m serious about bowhunting, and they’re very welcoming. I get the impression that in most bowhunting camps, guys would like to see more women in the sport. They’d like ladies to understand what hunting is all about, and why they have such a passion for bowhunting.

Georgianna, how do you feel about you and your husband hunting together?
Braden: Many times Michael and I hunt in a pop up blind. We take turns hunting and running the video camera, because we try to film all our hunts. This way we can hunt together and still be in the same blind together. We can get excited for each other, share the hunt and both be successful. One of us can take the animal, and the other can get the hunt on the video, so we both go home with a trophy, a great video and a great animal. This way we can be together in the outdoors and participate in a sport that we truly enjoy. Michael and I enjoy being with each other.

Why do you film all your hunts?
Braden: We like to share our hunts with other people, and we think a video is a much better keepsake of the hunt than just a picture with the animal we’ve harvested. We’ve found that the video allows us to relive our hunt anytime we want to, with whomever we want to share that experience.

 

Couple Hunters

PSE’S Michael Braden

How did you learn to become a videographer?
Braden: Two days before we were leaving for our honeymoon, we received a video camera. We were going to South Africa for a bowhunt. Michael spent the entire plane ride reading the manual and learning about the camera, and when we arrived at our hunting camp, Michael gave me a quick lesson on how to use it. We both learned to run the camera through trial and error. We really like hunting together, because we have the opportunity to share the same experiences. We get to watch the animals come in, and we get to share in the process of what happens before, during and after the shot. Another advantage that we have is that with two of us in a blind, we have another pair of eyes looking for game. We also can notice things that the other hunter may not see.

Michael and I are each others biggest fans. We go through the joy of a successful hunt together and the depression of a missed opportunity with each other. When I’m in the blind running the camera, I am focusing on the animal just like he is. As I look at that animal, I feel like I am aiming the bow for him. I go through this same range of emotions when Michael is in a shoot off in an archery tournament. My stomach gets in knots and I try to focus on the target, focus on Michael and mentally aim for him. When I won the Indoor Nationals, Michael was the first person to get to me and give me a hug. That’s a great feeling for us to share. We go through the same emotions that any family does if a husband, a wife, a son, a daughter, a brother, a sister, a mother or a dad is a competitive athlete. Because we both compete, we understand how much time, energy and effort we put into practicing and trying to get better. When one of us is on the line in a major competition, we understand the number of hours and sweat equity that person has expended to get to that position, and we can cheer for them.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE Performance Speaks for itself


Written By Matt Setzer
Matt Setzer

I have been a PSE loyalist for close to 30 years. My loyalty was earned when I bought my first PSE bow in the mid 80’s, shot it to death in a two year period, and was treated professionally and generously with a new replacement bow. They won me over with their good sense of customer service and they backed their products.

About 15 years ago my archery career had developed enough for me to be given the privilege of becoming a member of PSE’s shooting staff – A goal I had established when I first started shooting target archery in the 90’s. After accomplishing that goal I set my sights on another – to win a national championship.

Over the past decade I executed various tasks to try and accomplish that goal. Reading various archery books and articles, studying, training indoors and outside, attending shooting school all became part of my evolution. This past winter it all came together when I started shooting an EVO 7. It started with a 59x SFAA indoor state championship, followed by an indoor NFAA Mid-Atlantic Championship, an outdoor NFAA Mid-Atlantic Championship and culminated with a record breaking NFAA Outdoor National Championship in Senior Bow Hunter Freestyle.

Quite a run and I owe it to a hunting bow that shoots like a target bow. The 55 pounds I draw is smooth and easy on my 57 year old shoulders, and produces incredible speed that allows me to shoot a pin rack that is close to an inch in height, making my holds in, half in, touching, or framing close to the spot. The bow flat out shoots with consistency, forgiveness, and ease unlike any other bow I have ever shot.

Many thanks for designing and producing an easy shooting, high performance, quality bow that enabled me to realize my goal and make my dream come true. My loyalty continues to grow as PSE engineering and performance makes a resounding statement in the target and hunting world.

-Matt Setzer

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Georgianna Braden Says Archery Isn’t a Man Only World


Target Shooters

PSE’S Georgianna Braden

Editor’s Note: Georgianna Braden of Houston, Texas, is a petite, pixie like lady. If you saw her on the street or in the courtroom, you’d never consider her as one of the top female archers. She is not only a tournament archer, but also an avid bowhunter and an advocate for women’s archery. Georgianna, who’s been shooting a bow for 7 years, and her husband Michael are both members of the PSE Pro Staff.

Georgianna, how did being a woman in a sport that has in the past been viewed as a man’s sport feel?
Braden: One of the things I learned from the first tournament that I attended was when I explained I never had shot tournament archery before, the guys, as well as the ladies, were willing to help me and show me not only what tournament archery was about but how to improve. Guys as well as women told me, “Okay, this is what this part of the tournament is all about, and this is what you are supposed to do. Make sure you check out your bow, and remember these tips and suggestions.” The impression I got from the first archery tournament I ever attended, to the latest tournament I went to, was that all the competitors wanted me to come back and shoot another tournament with them. They did everything they could to make that tournament fun for me. Unlike many other sports, the participants wanted me to come back and compete with them.

Georgianna Braden Shooting PSE

PSE’S Georgianna Braden

Today some of my best friends are archers, both guys and girls. One of the things I believe is different about archery from any other sport is that even though you’re competing against other archers, the competition is never you against them. You compete to improve your own score and to improve your proficiency with a bow. Everyone I know who shoots competitive archery is really trying to help everyone else do the best they can. In a tournament, technically, I understand that we are all competing for first, second, or third place in the competition. But, my main concern at the tournaments that I attend, and also for the archers I know is that we are all there to try and improve on the scores we’ve shot at the last tournament. So, archery competition is more about you competing with yourself than it is about competing against the other archers. At the end of every tournament, I’m thinking, “How can I get better?” Really and truly I believe that when a lady comes into competitive archery, that’s the mindset she should adopt. If you focus on what you can do to improve your archery score, then you can be really successful.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Michael Braden Chooses Bowhunters First Bow


PSE Archery Compound Bow

PSE’S Michael Braden

Editor’s Note: Michael Braden of Houston, Texas, started shooting with PSE in the early 1990s, turned pro, shooting a PSE bow, in 1996, and won the ASA Rookie of the Year. Then in 2009, he came back to be a part of the PSE Pro Staff and has been shooting for PSE ever since, besides coaching shooters.

Michael, for a person who will start bowhunting this season, what bow do you recommend and why? I know that we have to consider the draw length and the weight that this new bowhunter can pull, but generally, what’s a good bow for a beginning bowhunter?

Braden: I really like the PSE EVO and believe it’s probably the best bow for most people getting into the sport of bowhunting. Its draw length is adjustable, and you can get the poundage light enough to start with so the individual can shoot the bow comfortably. You have to consider that when an archer first starts pulling a bow, he or she will not be using muscles that are used daily. But, as they begin to use those muscles, they’ll build that muscle strength fairly quickly. For that reason, buying a bow that’s light enough for you to start with and shoot accurately with is important. As your muscles get stronger, you don’t want to have to buy a new bow to compensate for your added strength. For instance, if you can only pull 50 pounds comfortably when you first start shooting your bow, within a few months, if you practice, you’ll build your strength up and be able to shoot a 60 or 65 pound bow. That’s the reason I like the EVO – it allows the hunter to dial the weight down, so he or she can pull the bow, shoot accurately and begin to build his or her muscles. Then by the time bow season comes in, the archer should be stronger than he or she was at the beginning and may want to increase the poundage. The EVO has the adjustments to let the archer do this. This bow will take an archer from being a beginner to being a top flight bowhunter without ever having to buy another bow. You can get a bow that maxes out at 60 pounds, but you can turn it down to start with to 47 or 49 pounds. There’s about a 10 to 12 pound range of adjustment.

PSE Hunts

PSE Bow Hunting

How much weight does a person really have to be able to pull in order to efficiently harvest a white tailed deer?

Braden: With the bows we have today, you could take a deer with a 40 pound bow. We don’t have to pull those heavy draw weights of 60-80 pounds like we did in the old days to be efficient as a hunter. Many men feel they have to pull the biggest, heaviest bows that are made, but you can harvest any animal on the North American continent with a 60 pound PSE bow. You just have to make sure what the laws require in each state where you will be hunting, as far as the bow weights that a hunter can use.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Michael Braden on Teaching Shooters


PSE Compound Bows

PSE’S Michael Braden

Editor’s Note: Michael Braden of Houston, Texas, started shooting with PSE in the early 1990s, turned pro, shooting a PSE bow, in 1996, and won the ASA Rookie of the Year. Then in 2009, he came back to be a part of the PSE Pro Staff and has been shooting for PSE ever since, besides coaching shooters.

Michael, when a bowhunter comes to you and says, “I’ve been bowhunting for several years, and I want you to check me and my bow out to help me learn to shoot better this year,” how do you coach this person?

Braden: Each piece of the puzzle on how to shoot better is just as important as any other piece of the puzzle. Shooting better is not only about your equipment, but your form and all the elements that go into shooting accurately. I always start with the archer first. I want the archer to understand his or her shot sequence, his form and the execution of a good shot. Next, I want to help strengthen his ability to hold the bow at full draw and aim correctly. Archery is an individual sport, so you have to make sure that the individual is married to a bow that fits his or her individual needs. For me, the first considerations are draw weight and draw length. I start out by making sure that the archer can pull the bow easily and comfortably, and that the draw length is matched perfectly to the individual. The archer is the core part of shooting accurately. Therefore, the equipment has to fit that individual as perfectly as possible. If the archer feels good about his form, shot sequence, bow mechanics and execution, he’ll feel much better about releasing the arrow when an animal presents a shot. Once the archer is in good shape for bow season, then we start considering different equipment and why the archer may shoot better with certain types of equipment rather than other kinds of equipment. We match the arrow and the broadhead to each bow and each archer.

We’re seeing a lot of women coming into the sport of archery, and especially into the sport of bowhunting. One of the most limiting factors seems to be the ladies’ concern about the strength required to pull bows. How do you usually start a lady in the sports of archery and bowhunting and convince her that she can become proficient enough to be a bowhunter?

Braden: Women, like men, come in different shapes, sizes and strength levels. I feel that the most important consideration when teaching a lady to shoot a bow is to start out shooting very light poundage, so she instantly sees that she can draw and hold a bow. She doesn’t have to be a super strong athlete. We have to make sure that the bow is not intimidating to a lady interested in the sport of archery. I want a lady to be able to draw the bow really comfortably, even if I need to start her out on a very low draw weight. As new archers begin to shoot their bows, they will build muscle strength very quickly. If they shoot and practice regularly, they will build muscles they don’t use every day. Through practice and repetition, they will strengthen and hone those muscles, so they can move up in poundage relatively quickly. I think their shooting enough arrows in practice sessions to learn something new every time they practice is very important. If they only can draw the bow back five times before they’re fatigued, they won’t be able to shoot enough arrows to progress quickly as archers. A beginner who only can get off 3-5 shots in a practice session will be very intimidated.

If you had a lady come to you and say, “I want you to teach me to shoot the bow,” and you didn’t know her already or know how strong she is, what weight of bow will you start her with, and how many arrows will you want her to shoot in a practice session?

Braden: I’d start her pulling a bow weight in the mid  to the upper 20 pound range and know that the lady make sure she could draw this weight comfortably. Hypothetically, I’d like to have a lady shooting 25-30 pounds and possibly shooting 30-40 arrows in a practice session, if she can shoot that poundage and that many arrows comfortably. From that baseline, we’ll begin to build her skill, muscle memory and the amount of weight she pulls.

How fast can you take this new lady, who never has shot a bow before, and have her hitting the target at 20 yards?

Braden: Within hours. Learning to shoot accurately, even for a beginner who’s never shot before, doesn’t take nearly as long now as it did several years ago. Today we have better equipment, better targets and better teaching methods. One of the big improvements in the speed at which a beginner learns is our ability to get the newcomer fitted correctly with the right bow. In past years, many newcomers would just buy a bow and try to learn to shoot it. Today, we teach, “Let’s see which bow you can shoot most comfortably and enjoy shooting, and then make the buying decision.” If the student is fitted properly with the right bow, he or she can be proficient enough to hunt in an extremely short time.

How many coaching sessions do you think would be required to take a person who’s never shot a bow before to a level of proficiency that allows that person to bowhunt?

Braden: I think 2-4 months of consistent practice and building up strength, understanding and knowledge of the sport, is enough time for anyone who really wanted to learn to bowhunt to become proficient enough to go into the field and take game when bow season arrives.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Michael Braden Discusses Young and Old Archers – PSE Has a Bow For Everyone


PSE Archery Bows

PSE’S Michael Braden

Editor’s Note: Michael Braden of Houston, Texas, started shooting with PSE in the early 1990s, turned pro, shooting a PSE bow, in 1996, and won the ASA Rookie of the Year. Then in 2009, he came back to be a part of the PSE Pro Staff and has been shooting for PSE ever since, besides coaching shooters.

Michael, you shoot almost all the disciplines of competitive archery, and you also coach almost all the disciplines. Why do you like competitive archery so much?
Braden: I guess it’s because archery fits everyone. There are categories of archery for every age, gender and skill level. There’s no reason that anyone can’t shoot competitive archery. We’ve even proven this with our physically impaired athletes – many of them compete in the Paralympic Games. So, there are no physical or age barriers that prevent anyone from coming into the sport.

Say you know a +65 year old man who’s retired, has bowhunted most of his life and wants to consider the possibility of shooting 3D archery now that he’s got some time on his hands. How are you going to teach him to shoot target archery?
Braden: The first step is to identify his draw length, and how much poundage he can pull comfortably. By using different cams, we can test some different draw cycles to find the one with which he’s most comfortable. If this gentleman can pull 55-60 pounds comfortably, that will open a number of doors to different types of bows and setups that he may enjoy shooting. He can buy a bow with a moderate draw cycle and use a faster cam. I think draw length and poundage that the person is comfortable with are the first and most important factors to consider when getting anyone into competitive archery. Then, we need to determine how harsh a cam he can draw comfortably. If he has a longer draw length and can pull fairly heavy poundages, he has the option of shooting almost any PSE bow. If he has a shorter draw length and can’t pull a lot of weight comfortably, we’ll look at some shorter axle to axle bows with lower brace heights, to help him get some speed out of his bow that he may need to be competitive. When we’re talking about target archery, one of the most critical factors is making sure that the bow fits the archer, and not trying to make the archer fit the bow.

Hunting at any Age

PSE Bow Hunting

As an archery coach, who is the oldest person you’ve ever coached to shoot competitive archery?
Braden: I had an older doctor friend of mine, and his objective was to be a proficient bowhunter. Money and time were no objects. He asked me to help him become the best bowhunter he could be, and I spent time preparing him for several different hunts. He went on his first grizzly bear bowhunt when he was in his mid-70s, and he had a successful hunt. He also took a moose with his bow on that hunt. At that time, he was pulling about 60 pounds.

Let’s look at the opposite end of the spectrum. How early do you start working with young archers?
Braden: I start with a youngster whenever he or she is old enough to pay attention and learn. I taught a youngster for several years, who is now 16 or 17, and she’s doing really well in FETA and NAA competitions. She also made the United States Junior Archery Team and will represent the United States at the Olympics in London. I also have my nieces shooting archery in their schools. I started them shooting when they were 10-12 years old, what I believe that 10-12 years old is a really good age to start a youngster shooting bows, They’re old enough to understand what you’re trying to teach them, and they learn quickly. They pay attention. Too, that’s the age when they’re exploring a lot of different sports.

With what bow would you start a youngster?
Braden: Both my nieces are shooting the PSE Chaos. PSE has this bow in a one cam or a two cam, so the youngster, coach or parent can choose which one of these two setups the youngster is prefers. I like the Chaos for youngsters, because it’s lightweight, the draw cycle is not very harsh, and the poundages go down very low. It also has modules that allow you to adjust the draw length as the youngster grows, a very important element for a bow to have when you’re starting children at 11-12 years old. They’ll hit growth spurts at different times and may grow a foot in a year, so you may have to change their draw lengths every 2 months when they’re in one of those growth spurts. Therefore, being able to adjust the bow as the child grows is important for several reasons. By adjusting the bow, you don’t have to buy a new bow, and the child doesn’t have to learn to shoot a different bow, since you can just adjust the one with which he or she is already comfortable.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE Bows = Success in the 2012 IBO National Triple Crown Overall!


BOHNING X-FORCE X-PRESS

Bohning X-Force X-Press Team - Bill Epeards, Joe Burns, Rich Corsi and Larry Van

Congratulations to the Bohning X-Force X-Press Team for winning the 2012 IBO National Triple Crown Overall event in the Senior Hunter Class Division! This is their fourth time winning the event! The total score was 3643. The Bohning X-Force X-Press Team is Bill Epeards, Joe Burns, Rich Corsi and Larry Van. The whole team shoots PSE bows. Frank Burns – PSE Omen Pro, Rich Corsi – PSE Bow Madness XL and both Larry Van and Bill Epeards shoot the PSE X-Force Dream Season EVO.

BOHNING X-FORCE X-PRESS

Bohning X-Force X-Press Team - Bill Epeards, Joe Burns, Rich Corsi and Larry Van

The Bohning X-Force X-Press Team also won all three legs of the Triple Crown in the Senior Hunter Class. Way to go guys!!


PSE’S Michael Braden Loves His PSE Bows


PSE Archery Compound Bow

PSE’S Michael Braden

Editor’s Note: Michael Braden of Houston, Texas, started shooting with PSE in the early 1990s, turned pro, shooting a PSE bow, in 1996, and won the ASA Rookie of the Year. Then in 2009, he came back to be a part of the PSE Pro Staff and has been shooting for PSE ever since, besides coaching shooters.

Michael, what is it that you like about PSE bows?
Braden: PSE always has had really good bows in every area of competitive archery and bow hunting. This quality of PSE bows is important to me, because I shoot both 3D archery and spots, and I also bow hunt. So, my participation in archery covers just about the entire spectrum of the sport. I try to shoot just about every kind of archery that I can shoot.

PSE Archery

PSE Dominator Compound Bow

Okay, let’s look at your bows of choice, and why you choose them.
Braden: For shooting indoors, I shoot the Dominator Pro with the Mini Evo Cams. I’ve really grown to like the ME Cams, because I like a really hard wall. With this cam, you have the ability to create that wall. And, I’ve always been a fan of two cams. The ME, because it’s a hybrid, is little more like the two cams, so I’ve really grown to like that cam. This bow is the one I’ve primarily been shooting spots with, but I’ve also been shooting the Dominator 3D. This bow is somewhat shorter axle to axle and somewhat faster than the Dominator Pro, and it allows me to test different arrow weights, sizes and poundage. I’ve really grown to like the Dominator 3D with its stiff riser and bridge support, so that I don’t have a lot of lateral torque on the bow. Their shorter axle-to-axle and shorter brace heights are elements that generate some really good speeds to help me be more competitive in the 3D arena. For me, the PSE Dominator 3D bow will be set up for IBO, which allows 5 grains of arrow weight for every pound you pull. The IBO rules also take into consideration draw length. The more draw length you have, the faster the bow will shoot. The Dominator 3D, with a 29 1/2 inch draw, delivers 314 feet per second for me, IBO. When we shoot ASA, there’s a speed limit of 280 feet per second, so I may shoot a bigger, heavier arrow when I’m competing in IBO. I choose to change arrow weights rather than change bows, to shoot two different tournament circuits.

Which hunting bow are you shooting, and why?
Braden: That’s a tough question. I’ve got several hunting bows that I really like, and I’m not sure which one I like the best. I have the PSE EVO, and I’m also shooting a custom bow, which is a Supra with short limbs and the EVO cams. It’s similar to the PSE Freak, because it has a Supra handle with the big EVO cams. So, I’m basically shooting the PSE Freak with short limbs, and I really like that bow. This is one very important reason I shoot PSE that everyone may not know. PSE has a custom shop, so you have the ability to take component parts from different bows and find that magical configuration that you like. The reason I like the PSE Freak with short limbs is because I come from a target background, and I like a more stable, more forgiving bow for my hunting. This bow is a little bit longer axle-to-axle than most of the hunting bows on the market today.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Team PSE’s Mike Miller takes the Arizona Triple Crown Championship in the Open Masters Division


PSE's Mike Miller

PSE’s Mike Miller

I have been involved with archery for many years, I have competed in several styles and in several age groups. Now that I am in the Masters Division shooting with individuals that have all been past champions, it is critical to have an accurate, versatile and forgiving bow.

I had my eye on PSE a couple of years ago and even though I was very happy with what I was shooting at the time, it was apparent to me that PSE‘s engineers had really met the design needs of today’s competitive archers and hunters. I could not be more satisfied with the equipment that PSE produces. They are fast, accurate, forgiving, quiet, no hand shock, and good looking too.

I own an Omen Pro, Supra ME, and a Bow Madness XL. All are quality products that can be shot with confidence if you are hunting, competing or just having fun at the range.

Mike Miller

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Master Coach Alexander Kirillov Sends More Archers to the 2012 Olympic Games!


Elias Malave and PSE's Master Coach Alexander Kirillov

Elias Malave and PSE’s Master Coach Alexander Kirillov

Elias Malave takes the gold with his PSE X-Appeal at the Archery World Cup in Odgen, Utah. This qualified him to go to the 2012 Olympic Games in London. His trainer is PSE’s Master Coach Alexander Kirillov.

Olga Bosch and PSE's Master Coach Alexander Kirillov

Olga Bosch and PSE’s Master Coach Alexander Kirillov

Olga Bosch from Venezuela won gold at the Pan American Championship in the FITA round with her PSE Dominator.

Elias Malave and Jeff Anderson

Elias Malave and Jeff Anderson

At the Pan American Championship in El Salvador, two PSE bows won gold and silver! Elias Malave from Venezuela won gold and Jeff Anderson from the United States won silver!

Ana Mendoza and PSE's Master Coach Alexander Kirillov

Ana Mendoza and PSE’s Master Coach Alexander Kirillov

Ana Mendoza from Venezuela won gold in the elimination round at the Pan American Championship in El Salvador with her PSE Supra!

Congrats to all the archers on their medals and to PSE’s Master Coach Alexander Kirillov on their successes!


PSE’s Christopher Perkins Gives Tips to Make You a More Productive bowhunter


Christopher Perkins - Target Archery Champion

Christopher Perkins – Target Archery Champion

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks of 2012, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. But, Perkins never really set out to be a tournament archer winning championships and money and gaining sponsors. Like many tournament pros, Perkins just wanted to shoot better, so he could become a more proficient bowhunter. However, Perkin’s love of bowhunting and the desire to become a better bowhunter lead him to participate in archery competitions and world championships. He discovered like many of us have that the marriage between target archery and bowhunting produces a much better target archer and bowhunter than just choosing one of these two archery sports.

Question: What is your opinion on using deer scents and deer lures for bowhunting?

I didn’t use deer scents and lures until last year when two of my buddies and I went to Illinois for a deer hunt. Up here in Canada, I primarily hunt funnels and pinch points where a large block of woods is necked down going to a feeding site. But, I found when deer are cruising in open woods that lures can be effective.

Question: Chris, give us five tips that will make anyone a better bowhunter.

* Participate in target archery to become a better bowhunter. Target archery teaches you not to just aim at the deer and not to just aim at the vital area but to aim at the center of the vital area or the spot you want to hit. In target archery, you learn to narrow your focus to a very small spot that you want to hit, which causes you to shoot more accurately at least that’s what happened to me. Learning that principle of target archery drastically has increased my accuracy as a bowhunter.  Target archery also has made me set up my hunting bow to be just as accurate as my target bow. To make a good shot as a professional archer, I need to be able to shoot and have the arrow hit in the center of a 2  or a 3 inch dot from 50 yards and at every distance for 50 yards to 5 yards. By learning to shoot that accurately, I am much more confident, I shoot better in the woods, and I spend less time trailing deer.

* Practice. Once again even if you don’t get to the point where you can shoot the center of a 2 inch dot at 50 yards, practice shooting archery in the off season to make you a better bowhunter than if you don’t practice.

* Keep your bow tuned up all year long. One of the big mistakes I see when hunters are shooting before the season, and for instance, they know that their strings have some wear on them, they’ll often think, “I can probably get one more season out of this string.” If you think that you can get one more season out of your bowstring, then the day you think that, go, and get a new string. Start shooting that string to get ready for bow season. Maybe you don’t think your sight or your rest or another piece of equipment bad enough or worn enough to justify replacing it. When you think that thought, that’s your brain telling you to replace that piece of equipment now. You never know when that trophy animal of a lifetime will be standing in front of you within bow range. When that opportunity comes along, you want to have the best equipment you can afford to do the best job it can possibly do.

* Make a friend of the people at your local bow shop. When you buy new equipment or new accessories, get them to set up your bow to make sure everything’s put on properly. Bow maintenance year round and practice shooting year round are the most critical elements in becoming a successful bowhunter. Developing your deer hunting skills is a given. You have to do that whether you bowhunt or gun hunt. What we are talking about is specifically being a better bowhunter.

* Develop patience   probably one of the most difficult skills. Remember that bowhunting is a game of waiting. Waiting also includes waiting for the animal to get within the distance that you feel confident that you can make an effective shot. For instance here in Canada where I hunt, I feel that I can make an effective shot at 50 yards IF there’s no wind, and the deer is calm and relaxed and either feeding or looking away from me. I can shoot accurately at distances greater than 50 yards. But in the places where I hunt and under the conditions that I hunt in, I choose not to take a shot of more than 50 yards. If the deer doesn’t come into that range, I don’t shoot  even though there’s a good chance that I can take the deer. You must have patience to wait long enough in the woods sitting in your tree stand or ground blind to finally see a deer and then to wait for that deer to get within the range for you to take a shot.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Dress for Success with PSE’s Christopher Perkins


Christopher Perkins - Target Archery Champion

Christopher Perkins – Target Archery Champion

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks of 2012, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. But, Perkins never really set out to be a tournament archer winning championships and money and gaining sponsors. Like many tournament pros, Perkins just wanted to shoot better, so he could become a more proficient bowhunter. However, Perkin’s love of bowhunting and the desire to become a better bowhunter lead him to participate in archery competitions and world championships. He discovered like many of us have that the marriage between target archery and bowhunting produces a much better target archer and bowhunter than just choosing one of these two archery sports.

Question: Christopher, what are the differences in shooting target archery and bowhunting as to the clothes you wear when in many target archery contests, you wear shorts and a tee shirt, but when you’re hunting at -27 degrees F at the end of a rut in Canada, and you have to sit in the cold for 6 hours to take a buck and must dress differently?

Since I live in Canada, I’m more accustomed to this type of weather than someone from Alabama maybe. The real secret to being able to shoot well in cold weather is to dress in layers and practice shooting the bow with all the clothes on that you’ll need to wear to hunt in cold weather. Or, that’s how I do it here in Canada. Another secret is not to bulk up too much. We have such good quality new high tech clothing that you really don’t have to get bulked up to stay warm and shoot accurately in extremely cold weather. I think your base layer (underwear) is the most important part of your cold weather clothing. I start off with tight layers of Under Armour underwear that fits very tight to my skin. That small zone between your skin and your clothing is where moisture first builds up. Moisture on your skin is a major factor in being cold. One misconception that some hunters have about constrictive type of underwear is that it can inhibit the shot. However, this Under Armour is the same type of underwear that many professional football players wear when they’re playing in extremely cold weather. And, they have to be far more mobile than a bowhunter does. So, I wear that type of base layer to keep moisture away from my skin and keep me warmer. Then I wear a little heavier layer on top of that to add an insulating layer that also helps to keep me warm. On top of that, I put my outer layer, which is usually windproof and waterproof bib coveralls and a heavier jacket.

Question: One of the big advantages that we have now that archers haven’t had in the past is that much of the hunting clothing we’re wearing today is being designed and engineered with more wicking and insulation properties, wind blocking and waterproofing than ever before. The hunting garment industry has become very aware of creating layering systems that are lightweight, very flexible and extremely warm. One of the big advantages that the bowhunter of today has is that much of today’s outdoor clothing is being designed for and created by garment makers who are bowhunters. Therefore, in today’s marketplace if you do a little bit of research and study, you can find lighter weight clothing that’s extremely warm that makes bowhunting in extreme temperatures much better and easier without having to put on clothes that are too bulky.

I don’t want to layer up with so much clothing that I can’t get off an accurate shot. One of the garments that I wear that I’ve found is extremely useful in cold weather is a bowhunter’s vest is made by Primos that allows me to keep everything packed in and tight on my chest and helps to keep my clothing away from my bowstring.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Christopher Perkins Gives Tips to Make You a More Productive bowhunter


PSE’s Christopher Perkins Says to Marry Tournament Archery to Bowhunting to Improve at Both Sports


Christopher Perkins - Target Archery Champion

Christopher Perkins – Target Archery Champion

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks of 2012, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. But, Perkins never really set out to be a tournament archer winning championships and money and gaining sponsors. Like many tournament pros, Perkins just wanted to shoot better, so he could become a more proficient bowhunter. However, Perkin’s love of bowhunting and the desire to become a better bowhunter lead him to participate in archery competitions and world championships. He discovered like many of us have that the marriage between target archery and bowhunting produces a much better target archer and bowhunter than just choosing one of these two archery sports.

Question: Tell us about some other deer you’ve taken with your PSE bow.

I took another buck in 2008 the same year I took my first buck. I took this 9 point buck in October. I never got a trail camera picture of this buck. He just showed up on the property. I had a box full of trail camera pictures of other bucks, but I didn’t have a single picture of this buck that weighed 180 pounds dressed. He was a small basket rack buck that came to within 20 yards, and I took the shot. He went only about 30 yards before he piled up

Christopher Perkins, like many other bowhunters who also shoot tournament archery, knows that one of the biggest advantages of shooting tournament archery during the off season is that you drastically can reduce the amount of time required to trail and find your deer when bowhunting, because you’ll shoot accurately. When you’re able to place the arrow exactly where it needs to go and either get a double lung shot or a heart shot, then most of the time you’ll only have to travel a short distance from where you’ve arrowed the buck to where you find him. Another factor that plays a major role in recovering your animals is the size of the entry hole and the size of the exit wound. The bigger the hole, the better the blood trail. The speed at which the arrow is traveling when it makes impact also helps ensure that you get a clean pass through   just one of the many reasons why people enjoy hunting with PSE bows, since PSE produces some of the fastest bows in the archery industry. In the past, the weight of the bow determined speed. Many years ago archers had to shoot heavy bows to get fast speeds. However, because of the cam systems and the intensive engineering designed in the PSE bows we have today, you can get that good speed with a lighter weight bow. Too, because of the let off system on today’s bows, you don’t have to hold that heavy poundage so long, while waiting for a buck to step out to the spot where you can take the shot. All of us who go afield to take game with our bows want to know that when we draw our bows back and put our sights on the spots we want the arrows to enter the animals that when we release these arrows, they it will fly true to the targets.

One of the best ways to shoot with confidence during hunting season is to build that confidence by shooting target archery in the off season. You not only learn the mechanical and physical skills required to make an accurate shot when an animal presents itself by shooting target archery, but just as importantly, you learn to control your emotions and be able to shoot accurately under pressure. When you’re in the woods, no one is watching when you make the shot. However, a buck of a lifetime standing in front of you impacts your shot with a tremendous amount of pressure, anxiety and adrenaline. When you are shooting target archery, everyone is watching the flight (other competitors you are shooting against) and the final rounds where observers also may include the press and possibly TV crews. In that situation, you have to face and overcome the same mental and emotional problems that you must face and overcome when you have the big game animal of a lifetime standing in front of you. So, shooting target archery in the off season not only will better prepare you mechanically to take game during the hunting season, but it will also better prepare you emotionally for the moment of truth when the big game animal of your dreams presents the shot.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

Tomorrow: Dress for Success with PSE’s Christopher Perkins


PSE’s Christopher Perkins Tells about His Invisible Buck and How He Took Him


Christopher Perkins - Bowhunter

Christopher Perkins – Bowhunter

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks of 2012, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. But, Perkins never really set out to be a tournament archer winning championships and money and gaining sponsors. Like many tournament pros, Perkins just wanted to shoot better, so he could become a more proficient bowhunter. However, Perkin’s love of bowhunting and the desire to become a better bowhunter lead him to participate in archery competitions and world championships. He discovered like many of us have that the marriage between target archery and bowhunting produces a much better target archer and bowhunter than just choosing one of these two archery sports.

Question: Tell us about another deer you took.

I took a deer in 2010 on December 26 with which I had quite a history. I’d been after this older buck for about 3 years. Once I took him, we aged him at about 6 1/2 years old.

Question: Christopher, how did you find this deer?

In 2008, I found where he was holding. The second year I never had an encounter with him, but I had plenty of trail camera pictures of the buck. I knew he was still on the property and hadn’t been harvested by anyone else. I used Moultrie and Bushnell trail cameras on our 243 acre farm. Only two of us hunt the property. So, I loaded up with trail cameras to locate the bucks I wanted to take during hunting season. I think using trail cameras is important, because, since I didn’t have an encounter with this buck, I easily could have given up hunting him. I could have assumed that someone else had taken him, or that he had left the property, if I hadn’t had his pictures on my trail camera the second year I hunted him. This 8 point buck had 5 3/4 inch bases on his antlers and weighed 225 pounds field dressed. I believe that many times there may be big bucks on the properties we hunt that only move at night or just before daylight. Without using trail cameras, we’ll never see or know that we have a trophy buck on the lands we’re hunting. This particular buck was moving when I wasn’t on the property, or he was coming in to feed after I had left.

This buck was one of those really hard deer to hunt   probably the toughest deer I’d ever hunted. He was a very smart buck. He knew where to be when I was in the woods, and he understood where he could be when I left the woods. He would come to feed either late at night or early, early, early in the morning. Therefore I couldn’t go to my stand early in the morning, because I’d spook him off his feed. Then late in the evening, I’d stay in the stand until black dark, and after I left the stand, he would show up. This buck knew what was going on, and he had patterned me to know when and where I would be hunting him. That third year I caught up to him at the end of the rut in really, really cold weather. I sat in my stand for 6 hours on December 26, when the weather  was -27 degrees F. I’ve learned that deer will be on their feet when an area has a hard cold snap and looking for food close to their bedding region. To put the odds even more in my favor, I knew the time was the end of the rut in our section of the country, and he would be chasing does. When I spotted him, he was chasing does. Then I saw the buck coming in behind a doe he was so focused on that he wasn’t aware of anything else around him. When the doe stopped, he stopped, and I was already at full draw. Once he took the arrow, he only went 30 yards before he piled up. I took that buck with my PSE Vendetta bow   the same bow I’d taken the buck with earlier that year. This buck had come in to the same food source. I’m convinced that when you’re hunting older age class bucks you need to have as many elements in your favor as you possibly can. With this buck, the cold snap got the buck up and moving and looking for food, and the time was at the end of the rut, which meant he would be looking for those last does that were ready to breed before the rut ended.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Christopher Perkins Says to Marry Tournament Archery to bowhunting to Improve at Both Sports


PSE’s Christopher Perkins – Bowhunter Who Became a World Class Target Archer


Christopher Perkins - Bowhunter

Christopher Perkins – Bowhunter

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks of 2012, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. But, Perkins never really set out to be a tournament archer winning championships and money and gaining sponsors. Like many tournament pros, Perkins just wanted to shoot better, so he could become a more proficient bowhunter. However, Perkin’s love of bowhunting and the desire to become a better bowhunter lead him to participate in archery competitions and world championships. He discovered like many of us have that the marriage between target archery and bowhunting produces a much better target archer and bowhunter than just choosing one of these two archery sports.

Question: Christopher, when did you start bowhunting for deer?

I went on my first deer hunt when I was 12 years old. I had to be 12 to get a license, and in Canada, you had to take a test before the government would issue you your license. I’d been shooting the bow for a year before hunting season began. I started bowhunting with my dad as soon as I got a license. That first year, I took my first deer, and it was a doe. I shot her at 4 yards. She came across the field and walked right past me. I drew my bow and took the shot. After she took the arrow, she ran about 50 yards and piled up.

Question: What did you feel like when you took your first deer with your bow?

I had a huge adrenaline rush. It’s a feeling that’s hard to describe. I thought I could take a deer out to 20 or 30 yards, but I’d only been shooting for a year. I couldn’t believe that I’d gotten within 4 yards of that deer before turning my arrow loose. I guess that first deer is what really fueled the fires of my archery career. I knew that target archery, at least for me, was a necessity to be a good bowhunter. Since I’ve had my PSE Vendetta, I’ve taken three other bucks with it. The first buck I took with a PSE bow on October 4, 2010, was an 8 point and I took him with my PSE Omen. The buck was 16 or 17 yards away, when I released my arrow. He only went 10 yards before he tipped over. I shoot a Rage Two Blade Broadhead, a mechanical broadhead that makes a big entry hole and a big exit hole. When you hit a deer with this broadhead, you don’t have to do much tracking. I was hunting on the edge of a food plot at a pinch point, where the deer funneled into the food plot. This buck was the only deer I saw that day. If you’ll aim behind the deer’s shoulder at mid body, you’ll have a pretty good hit. But, I try and aim at the center of what I consider a 2 inch target on each deer. Target archery has taught me to not look at the entire target, even though it may be 2 inches in diameter. So, when I’m at full draw on a buck and have picked out the spot I want the arrow to hit, I try and aim in the center of that spot. I concentrate on exactly where I want the arrow to go and forget about the deer, and keep my total focus on the spot I want to hit. Whether I’m shooting target archery or bowhunting, I want to make the spot I’m aiming at as small as possible. Every time I put my pin on a specific spot, I want to make a shot of a lifetime. I want to shoot the best arrow I’ve ever shot. Again, this philosophy comes from target archery.

Question: What type of sight are you using?

I use a multi pin sight for bowhunting called the Axcel Armortech Pro. My pins are set from 20 to 60 yards. So, when this buck came in, I put my 20 yard pin just a little bit low on the spot I wanted to hit, and the arrow went right into the buck’s heart.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Christopher Perkins Tells about His Invisible Buck and How He Took Him


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