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PSE’s Jared Bloomgren on How to get youth into Archery/Bowhunting.


By Jared Bloomgren

Jared Bloomgren

PSE’s Jared Bloomgren is Emmalynn’s caddy to the turkey set-up

Getting a youth started in archery and/or bowhunting is something that I take to heart. It is up to us that love this sport today to help keep it going into the future. They are the ones that hold the key to archery and bowhunting’s future. I cherish getting the opportunity to teach youngsters and novices alike more about our sport that I am addicted to!

For a part time job I work as an Archery Expert at a local sporting goods store and I am in a unique position that lets me help others get into the sport of archery and bowhunting. I help all ages alike, novices and veterans with everything that they are looking for insight on. I very much enjoy helping all that I can with everything that is in me. I especially like to help youngsters get acquainted with their newfound love for archery!

Jared Bloomgren

PSE’s Jared Bloomgren teaching youth

I take a very subtle approach with a child just getting into archery. I do not want to overwhelm them and scare them or make them any more nervous than they already are. I like to introduce myself and explain my job to them just before asking them what they know about archery and bow and arrows. I get some pretty interesting responses at times! Other times it is amazing what some kids know about archery. Some children have parents that are into archery and they know quite a little, some kids do not have that type of influence in their life and they are looking for someone to guide and teach them, and some have talked their parents into letting them try it. At any rate I like each situation about the same!

Jared Bloomgren

Youth shooting Targets

Take my children for example. My almost 3-year-old daughter Emmalynn has her first bow that I started her on almost a year ago. I didn’t have to try to get here into archery. She simply wanted to because I was doing it. I bought her a small bow and she likes to shoot it when I am shooting mine. Sure her attention span is very short and may only shoot a couple of arrows at a time but it is great each and every time regardless! I let her decide when and how much she wants to shoot. That way she can determine what she gets out of it. If you push archery and any other sport onto a child you chance the unthinkable of happening…they lose the drive, their want, or any interest in wanting anything to do with it. Don’t chance it! Take a slow approach at it and take your time with them. Allow them to choose how involved they are at first. Trust me, they will want to shoot more as time goes on and as comfort levels grow!

This last spring I was able to take my daughter spring turkey hunting. I remember the first time out and I worried it would be too much for her. I picked her up her favorite meal, a McDonalds Cheeseburger Happy Meal with chocolate milk! This helped break up the long sits as she would enjoy her meal when we got to a point where she was able to eat it. Sometimes it was when I was setting up the blind and decoys or when we were sitting in the blind or even when walking into our set up with her and the blind on my back as ketchup dripped down my neck! All very unforgettable! I wasn’t concerned about killing a gobbler, I was more concerned about teaching her a few things about hunting. I will also never forget the walk on our way out of our first evening hunt. Emmalynn was struggling to keep up with my slow pace as she decided she wanted to walk. No complaints from me as it lessened my load! She picked nearly every dandelion along the way and blew them at me and laughed with excitement each time! Priceless! Suddenly she seemed very concerned as she grabbed my pant leg and I thought, “She has had too much and she is gonna say she wants to go home.” Instead she looked at me with her beautiful big blue eyes and said, “Daddy, can I come back huntin with you again someday?!” I instantly felt week knees and emotions overcome me. “How bout tomorrow Daddy?!” I very unforgettable moment! I felt like I had taken the biggest trophy of a lifetime! I felt very successful in my raising of my child!

Jared Bloomgren

PSE’s Jared Bloomgren Daughter Emmalynn and her Mcdonalds in the blind

I felt extreme success on that day unlike any hunt I have ever been on. I knew right then what my father meant about hunting with his boys. I felt a connection like never before and I was overwhelmed beyond recognition! Emmalynn and I were able to get our first gobbler together a couple of weeks later and that was just icing on our cake!!!

Jared “J-Rod” Bloomgren is a hardcore Do-It-Yourself bowhunter who strives to better himself each year in the outdoor community. As a professional hunter, freelance writer and photographer, he likes to relive his outdoor adventures through written expression and photography making the reader feel as if they were along on the hunt. He attributes much of his success to the vital education he has learned from the various big game animals that he hunts. He is quoted as saying, “In each and every hunt, success or defeat, I learn something from every outing and that I can put in my arsenal of knowledge to use at a later date, a later date that will again put my wits against that of my prey.”

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson is Hunting with her husband


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

Emily Anderson

The Andersons

Okay, Ladies, I’ve mentioned it before that I hunt with my husband. While I am so thankful that we share a hobby, there are definitely pros and cons of having the same bowhunting addiction. I thought it would be fun to put together a brief list of pros and cons. Here is what I came up with…

PROS of hunting with your husband:

1. Spending quality time together in the woods. The sport of hunting has allowed Troy and I to spend countless hours together hiking around in the woods. We’ve been able to share so many memories simply because we have this common interest.
2. Opportunity for communication. Seriously. We’ve had some great conversations related to hunting… planning upcoming trips, ethics of hunting, and simply reminiscing on previous hunts
3. Meat! With two hunters in your household, the potential for never having to buy store bought meat just doubled.
4. Competition. Who doesn’t like a little friendly competition with their spouse? I know I do. There’s always the question of who is going to fill their tag first, or even whose animal tastes better.

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Hunting with her Husband

CONS of hunting with your husband:

1. Double punch to the wallet. Your husband’s hobby just became twice as expensive! Say “hello” to two sets of range finders, arrows, camouflage clothes, bows, etc. The list is never ending.
2. Unwanted Coaching. My husband will admit this one. He is pretty tough on me, but I know his intentions are good. When I first started shooting, he critiqued me pretty hard. My form, anchor point, stance, etc., were all subject to review. Honestly, Ladies, I would suggest having a friend or someone at the local archery shop give you pointers when you first start out. I had to and from time-to-time still find myself getting a second opinion from someone other than my husband.
3. Disagreements. There may be times where you have different opinions on where to hunt, or even how often. Communication is key!
4. Vacation Drain. Be prepared to spend all of your vacation time on hunting trips. While I don’t think this necessarily a bad thing, be forewarned that you may start finding yourself investigating what you can hunt even on vacations to tropical locations!

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.
 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’S Albert Quackenbush Teaching Our Children


By Albert Quackenbush
www.SoCalBowhunter.com

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush givng his daughter a lesson in proper hand placement

When my dad taught me how to shoot a bow I felt like I was on top of the world. I was able to take part in something I knew he loved and I got to learn from him. From shooting at straw bales in the backyard to hunting whitetails on the farm, you could almost always find us with a bow in our hands. He was an excellent teacher and to this day is very encouraging when it comes to bow hunting. Now I am in that role of being a father. As parents, my wife and I have the responsibility of guiding our daughter and molding her into the woman she’ll become. We can teach her things together as parents, and we can also share our own individual gifts with her. It goes without saying that what I share most with her, on an individual level, is bow hunting. Just as I won’t hide from anyone who asks me about hunting, I will not hide what I do and love from her. By sharing my side of life she will learn about her dad, but also learn more about herself as she grows.

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Showing his daughter a good example of how to shoot

As my dad taught me the ways of the bow, I have begun teaching my daughter, Riley. It’s not only the archery that I share with her though. When I turn on an outdoor television show about bow hunting, I take note of what’s happening and also what my daughter is doing. Explaining what is happening during the shows is easy. She follows right along, but the hard part is making sure she understands it. When an animal is shot with an arrow, I don’t cover her eyes and I don’t tell her they ‘caught’ the animal as I have heard other parents do. This father is sure to tell his daughter that the animal was shot and killed. It died. Stopping there would make no sense and I explain that the person is going to eat the animal or share it with someone else who will eat it. She may not understand it all now, but as time progresses it will all begin to make sense.

On almost any Saturday (hunting season excluded) the early hours usually have a typical storyline. I wake up and make some coffee. Riley wakes up shortly thereafter and we get a few hours to do what we’d like. Her eyes light up when I ask her if she’d like to head down to our garage to play. The great thing about my relationship with my daughter is that even at 3 1/2 she knows that if we are heading out to the garage she can always shoot her bow. For the past couple months, when we get down there she nearly always ask if she can shoot her bow and arrows. As a bow hunter and father, this makes me a very proud papa! Every time she asks my answer is a resounding YES! The bow she is using is just a little shooter with suction cup tipped arrows and I am trying to instill safety in her, so we always shoot outside the house. She doesn’t seem to mind if we are shooting at a piece of cardboard, she just enjoys it! The first few times she wanted my help, but anyone with kids knows they want to do it themselves very quickly.

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Daughter Riley wanting to do it herself, nocks another arrow

The thrill I get when Riley walks around the house and mimics shooting a bow is undeniable. She will pretend to draw her bow and tell me she is shooting an elk. (I guess I have been talking a lot about elk hunting lately.) She even asks me about my trips to the archery range, shooting with my friends and if I had fun doing it. Now THAT will make any bow hunting dad proud. It makes my day when I hear her ask me things like that. She listens intently and hopefully will keep a few tips from dear-old dad tucked away for future use.

I want to encourage all of you bow hunters who are also parents to share the details of hunting with your kids. Don’t shelter them and hide the truth of what happens when we hunt. If you are honest with them, they will appreciate what bow hunting is more than you’ll ever know. The phrase has been repeated over and over, but I feel it speaks the truth – bowhunting is my passion. I am not expecting Riley to have that same passion. The only thing I can expect is for her to choose her passion for herself. Whatever she chooses to be her passion, you can bet that her mother and I will support her in every way we can.

Albert Quackenbush has been bowhunting for more than 28 years. He shares his adventures on his blog, www.SoCalBowhunter.com, and also writes for Bow Adventures e-magazine. He is a Pro Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com, Piranha Custom Bowstrings and Field Logic. He is a member of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, California Deer Association, and is a Life Member of the North American Hunting Club.

Albert was born and raised in New York State where he learned to hunt everything from squirrels to whitetail deer. He currently resides in Southern California with his wife and daughter and hunts year round.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Dustin Jones Documenting the Hunt


By Dustin Jones
Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones Elk Hunt

So recently I was asked to be a part of an elk hunting documentary called Elk Tour. This was a great opportunity to spend three days chasing elk in hopes of putting some meat in the freezer as well as capturing it all on film. I was like a little kid waiting for Christmas morning. I had been looking forward to this hunt and was counting down the days.

Day 1
My dad had taken the day before the hunt off and headed up and had set up camp while he patiently waited for my brother and me to meet up there. Once we got there we immediately began to plan what we were going to do the next morning. We finally narrowed it down and went to bed. That next morning we were up and headed out to the top of the ridge in hopes of hearing the elk screaming away. We made the climb and just as we got to the top, we heard a bull bugle off in the distance. My brother and I got all set up and my dad was set up further up the ridge calling. The adrenaline was going and we were all anxious to start seeing some elk. But unfortunately the elk never came into the calls.

Dustin Jones' Dad's Elk

PSE’s Dustin Jones Set up and Ready

We then made it around to our trail cameras we had on a water hole that we had found. We check the pictures to see if the elk were coming in for water and from both cameras we could tell that they were coming in occasionally but not as many elk as we would have liked to have seen. But they were coming into the water in the evenings, so we made a decision that I would sit up on the water hole that evening and my dad was going to sit down below near this meadow. As I sat up on the water hole, there was nothing moving. The elk weren’t talking and the night was closing in so I decided to hunt my way back down to where my dad was sitting.

As I came into the opening I could hear my dad cow calling so I made sure I was in the tree line as I slowly made my way closer. Just as I saw him he started waving to me to hurry over to him and pumping his fist; the universal sign of success. As I hurried up to him he told me the whole story. He was sitting there watching the meadow when he saw a cow and what he thought was a spike hot on her trail. The bull was chasing her around and they were moving in closer to where my dad was sitting. Then they made their way into the trees so he hustled down the trail and as he rounded the corner he could hear them walking around. He then spotted the cow through a little opening so he ranged her and she was just over 50 yards. So my dad got ready and just as he was getting ready, the spike busted the cow and there he stood in her place. He was just 10 yards further from where she was and my dad ranged him at 61 yards. He drew back and waited for him to turn just enough to give him a shot. Just as he turned my dad let the arrow fly. The bull was quartering away from him as he shot and my dad saw the arrow hit the bull. He was a little uneasy about the shot but as he explained it to me I thought without a doubt that he wouldn’t have gone very far. Where we were hunting there have been several grizzly bear encounters and even some attacks. So with the evening fast approaching and my dad was uneasy about the shot we backed out for the night.

Dustin Jones'

PSE’s Dustin Jones’ Dad’s Elk

Day 2
The next morning my dad and my brother headed out in search of the elk while my buddy and I tried put another elk on the ground. We got all set up early in the morning at the top of the ridge and it wasn’t too much longer that we started hearing something walking through the brush. We glassed down the hill and saw several elk wandering back and forth so I let out a couple cow calls on my reed to try and draw them up. Then we sat and watched as the small herd zig zagged their way up the ridge our way. I started getting excited and the adrenaline was pumping. I had my arrow knocked and ready to go. My friend looked over and he said that he saw the broadhead just bouncing because of the nerves. They came within 60 yards of us but never offered me a clean shot due to some fallen timber they were behind. The lead cow ended up busting us and then they were gone.

Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones’ Father

We then side hilled up the canyon hoping to get a glimpse at the herd again. Unfortunately we never got another opportunity at that herd. But in our search, we ended up hearing a bull bugle further up the canyon. This was one of the few bulls that were actually vocal so we snuck into position and listened in. You could tell this was a decent herd bull by the way how vocal he was. I let out a few cow calls and he would bugle back at me. I then got him ticked off at me by letting of a young bull bugle in his direction. You could hear him raking trees, scraping the rocks on the ground, and running all over the place. This whole time he was doing this we were just waiting for him to show himself. We sat and listened for a while hoping he would just walk out of the timber and into the open. We then started noticing he was making his way back down the canyon so we tried making a stalk on them from behind. Luck wasn’t on our side this time either.

Dustin Jones' Dad's Elk

Dustin Jones’ Dad’s Elk Quarters

We then headed back to meet up with my dad to help pack out his elk. Even though packing out the elk quarters and the meat is always a lot of work, there is nothing better knowing that you have meat in the freezer. That evening we had some fresh elk back straps for dinner next to the campfire. We did go back out hunting that evening and the following morning but we didn’t encounter any elk. It was a great weekend of elk hunting and I was happy to have been able to share that moment with my dad and my brother. Nothing beats coming home with meat in the freezer.

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.

Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Will Jenkins Reviews the PSE X 5-Arrow Quiver


By Will Jenkins
http://www.thewilltohunt.com/

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins Quiver

I seem to get a different quiver every year. I started with an Alpine 5-Arrow quiver, but it was loud. I moved to the G5 Mag-Loc Quiver, while I like the magnet design sometimes it was a little too strong and the hood was too large. Now I’ve got the PSE X 5-Arrow Quiver, and can say that this will be on my bow for years to come.

First off, it’s a two piece design which I absolutely love because of the versatility. Depending on what I’m packing in my quiver is either attached to my bow or the side of my pack. To clip to the bow it easily rotates into place and is held in place rock solid. It has a low profile that makes it attach nicely to the bow and not put too much weight out away from the riser. Once in stand I either take it off my bow and attach it to my pack or hang it from a hook. The quiver has a metal loop in the design at the top that makes it very easy to hang up on the side of the tree, stand or pack.

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins X 5-Arrow Quiver

I’ve used fixed blade and mechanical broad heads this season and both fit nicely in to the foam inside the hood. As with any quiver or anytime I knock an arrow with a mechanical broad head I check to make sure they didn’t move or partially open in transport. The design of the bottom of the quiver does a good job of holding the arrows tightly without making loud popping sounds when placing arrows in the quiver or removing them.

PSE's Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins Reviews the PSE X 5-Arrow Quiver

Overall, I’m more than satisfied with both the look and performance of this quiver. It easily accommodates multiple arrows sizes as well as both mechanical and fixed broad heads. At retail price of $99 it’s not the cheapest on the market but it’s a solid quiver that will last a long time and look great on your bow.

Will Jenkins is creator of TheWilltoHunt.com and Harnesses For Hunters. He’s an avid outdoorsman who enjoys sharing his experiences through his blog. He also writes for Bow Adventures e-Magazine and is a member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association.

Will lives in Central Virginia with his wife and two kids. He hunts in Virginia and Maryland but has dreams of heading west to hunt Elk and Mule Deer.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


“Ain’t Nothin’ Too Tall” by PSE’s Jared Bloomgren


By Jared Bloomgren

Jared Bloomgren

PSE’s Jared Bloomgren A Great Find

Since my last post was about my favorite place to hunt; the mountains, let’s document a 14 day hunt that took place near and above 10,000 feet. This is a quick day by day account of a backcountry hunt.

Day 1-4: Strictly these days were in order to hike into the area and set up a camp at high elevation above the tree line and to spend 3 days scouting before the archery season was to open. A very dear friend of mine was along to film this hunt with me. We were able to find a huge non-typical mule buck that would make anybody’s jaw drop and plans began to get set in place as to how to close the distance on this monster in the days to come!

Day 5-6: Found numerous shooter bucks in the area while paying particular attention the huge non-typical that would easily score over the 200” mark. There were no stalking situations that presented themselves and the buck was missing for most of this time.

Day 7: A failed attempt to get in front of the huge non-typical quickly made my mind up to wait for him to come back out of the dark timber in the evening. We were perched in a small saddle with cover awaiting the bucks to head back over the top and into the basin to feed and drink for the night. My camera man failed to pay attention as the huge non-typical and numerous other bucks closed the distance. I had to watch as the huge buck disappeared out of my life forever. They keyed in on him messing with his camera rather than preparing for laying down some amazing footage! Aaaahhhhhh…..

Day 8: Trying hard to not kick my buddy off the mountain for messing up a deer of a lifetime opportunity for me all while watching another buck that I had become to know well as he fed on the same ridge almost every morning. Found numerous other bucks but nothing of his caliber.

Day 9: Watched again as the same buck fed on a very distant ridge. I decided to name this buck “Too Tall” as the ridge he was on was too far away and very tall as well as him having a very tall rack with huge backs. It seemed like I would never make the attempt to go after this buck even as predictable as he was because of the terrain and the effort needed to make it happen!

Day 10: A failed stalk on a different buck had me walking nearly vertical to reach the top of the mountain where I set off from. Here is where the burning lungs and aching legs really came into play! I tried not to think about the buck on the distant ridge but my mind kept coming back to him and if I wanted to go after him or not.

Jared Bloomgren

PSE’s Jared Bloomgren Bivy Camp Out

Day 11: Watched again as the buck I nicknamed “Too Tall” fed on the same ridge in the morning and evening but his location was a good half a day hike away or better in bear country. Attempted a stalk on a nice buck but was unable to complete the stalk because of misjudged terrain.

Day 12: After finally coming to terms with myself that the huge non typical was not going to show himself before I had to leave the mountain I decided to make the long move to try and kill that big typical buck I nicknamed “Too Tall.” All while still trying not to kick my buddy off the mountain for what happened on day 7! We set out on a long journey that would have us camped out below where we had seen the buck numerous times.

Day 13: After a restless night sleeping on a steep slope in a bivy set-up with a potential grizzly close by that was encountered in the dark the previous night; I was awakened from frost falling off of my sleeping bag onto my neck. A short hike in the darkness had me overlooking the ridge that was very distant the previous 12 days. The buck was nowhere in sight. After pressing on farther we finally located the buck higher on the open ridge now with two other bucks. I was able to complete that stalk on camera with boots off, above 10,000 feet, and put an arrow through both lungs of “Too Tall” at 23 yards! That is what dreams are made of!! Finding a bloody arrow after making a great shot is like finding gold! The rest of the day was spent deboning, caping and packing the buck off the mountain and back to the truck; all while barely surviving the worst lightning and thunderstorm ever! The hail never seemed to stop either! Never had lightening that close before! I could feel the electricity in my hair! Getting back to the truck late, soaked and chilled to the bone, blistered feet, hungry and tired but replaying the shot in my head made it all fade away……

Jared Bloomgren

PSE’s Jared Bloomgren “Too Tall”

Day 14: Awoke at the trail head with the thought of having to go back in to break down camp wasn’t very excitable. My body was abused and sore but I pushed that to the side…….I wondered if everything would just stay there for next year’s hunt?! Figured that wouldn’t be a good idea and set back in after getting the meat on ice. Once reaching camp we spent the rest of the day recouping and eating plenty to help lessen the weight on our backs for the final trip out for the year. Not so sure that was a good idea later on!

Jared Bloomgren

PSE’s Jared Bloomgren Packing Out To Tall

Day 15: Packed camp off the mountain and headed for home with many memories to cherish and a buck that scored over 180”! Although my buddy and I are still very close to this day….I have not let him forget the buck of a lifetime that should have been on my wall! ;)

Jared “J-Rod” Bloomgren is a hardcore Do-It-Yourself bowhunter who strives to better himself each year in the outdoor community. As a professional hunter, freelance writer and photographer, he likes to relive his outdoor adventures through written expression and photography making the reader feel as if they were along on the hunt. He attributes much of his success to the vital education he has learned from the various big game animals that he hunts. He is quoted as saying, “In each and every hunt, success or defeat, I learn something from every outing and that I can put in my arsenal of knowledge to use at a later date, a later date that will again put my wits against that of my prey.”

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson Prepares Hunting Camp Meals


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

PSE's Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson

In my last post, I talked about preparing your body and gear prior to a hunt. In this post I’d like to talk a little bit about food. Who doesn’t like to talk about food, right?One of the last things I do prior to a hunt is prepare all the food for the trip. I like to do as much food prep ahead of time which makes meal time upon returning to base camp after a hunt easy. I don’t want to be fussing with putting something together after I’ve come back from a long hike, it’s dark and I’m tired. Therefore, I do a lot of thinking and planning ahead of time to make sure that my meals are ready to go and all I need to do is heat them up. I usually prepare them a couple days prior to our hunt and then freeze them solid so they are good to pull out of the cooler whenever we want a meal during our hunting week. (Hint: Use a disposable casserole pan so there are no dishes to be done either)

Here are some meal ideas that I return to year after year because they are non-fuss, plus my hunting friends threaten to harm me if I don’t show up at camp with…

ELK LASAGNA
Cook lasagna noodles (el dente)
Prepare sauce – brown 1 lb. ground meat (elk or whatever game meat is in your freezer). Sauté in with the meat, two minced cloves of garlic. Add one can tomato sauce and one can diced tomatoes. Add 1-2 tablespoons of oregano or Italian seasoning. Cover and let simmer for 20 minutes.
Build lasagna – butter the bottom of the pan, and then layer with noodles, then mozzarella cheese, cottage cheese, meat sauce and parmesan cheese. Continue with layers, ending with meat and parmesan cheese until pan is full. Cover with tin foil and freeze.

CHICKEN ENCHILADAS
Cook several chicken breasts, shred and mix in taco seasoning. Prepare a box or two of Spanish rice. Butter the bottom of a 9×13 disposable pan. Build enchiladas with the following ingredients… Black beans, taco chicken, cheese, rice, Pico de Gallo sauce. Roll each enchilada tightly. (I usually fit 6-8 in a pan depending on how big I make them). Cover the top of the enchiladas with a can of cream of chicken soup (Helps to keep them from drying out), and a layer of shredded cheese. Cover and freeze.

PSE's Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Camp Fire

Both of these meals can be heated up either on a grill or oven in a camper (if you have one).

I have lots more hunting meal ideas, so stay tuned for future posts!

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Back up Bow by Pedro Ampuero


By Pedro Ampuero
AdventurousBowhunter.com

Pedro Ampuero

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero Back Up Bow

We all travel a lot of miles to get to our hunting areas, sometimes by car, train or plane. The hunt is only a few days and all the equipment must work perfect.

To avoid any problem in the hunts, the most important thing is to take care of the bow and bring it in all hunts in the best conditions as possible. Try to have a reliable bow and accessories, you don’t want a sight getting loose, or bow strings stretching with temperature changes. Always take equipment you are confident with, and that you have tested before, hunts are not for trying new things.

Although you do your best to have all your equipment perfect, things always happen in the most unwanted moment, and we can have hundred kinds of things going wrong in the bow. My bow fell down a tree and broke a limb with one of my steel tree steps. I had to throw my bow down the mountain to save my life on a steep area hunting for ibex. All the brush from the Cameroon rain forest moved my peep sight. I have broke sights, rests, releases… Lot of things!

Pedro Ampuero

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero Hunting Gear

Years ago I use to take all the required equipment to solve any problem on my bow I could have. I had a portable bow press and was ready to change strings and cables, also brought spare sights, rests, etc.. This could save your hunt! Although it took a lot of time to solve a major problem on your bow, and all that time you could be hunting. Apart from that, is hard to get the bow as good as you would like. You need to sight again your sight, adjust the rest, etc.. When you are in the middle of the mountains it is hard to do things properly.

For all these reason, I am taking always with me in all my hunts a back up bow. The backup bow is exactly the same rig as the hunting bow, that way I have also a spare part of anything, from sight, rest, bolts,.. At the same time, I am using the exactly same arrows for both, which save extra space. This bow is perfectly set, and I could change one bow with the other and be hunting without even notice. I can distinguish them because they are different camo, that’s it.
What do you do, bring a back up bow or the equipment necessary to solve any problem?

Good luck in the mountains, be safe,
Pedro Ampuero

Pedro is a mechanical engineer by trade and a bowhunter by heart. He is the co-founder of the blog AdventurousBowhunter.com and Cazandoconarco.es and has written many articles for the hunting industry and currently collaborates with the most prestigious companies on the industry.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Preparing for a Southern California Hunt


By Albert Quackenbush
Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Glassing is a key to SoCal hunting Success

From grammar school through college I was a doodler. On every sheet of paper or napkin you’d find some sort of doodle showing what I was thinking about that day. Nowadays, doodles can be found in the way of biologist phone numbers, road names, and illustrations of what I have seen in certain areas. Similar to that, when I plan for a Southern California hunt, I am constantly taking notes in many different forms. Planning for a hunt out here is very much like school – you have to do your homework to be successful. I get emails and blog questions asking me where to go and how to find animals to hunt, but that’s just the surface work.

The number one question I get asked is how do I find a place to hunt in Southern California? Homework and a positive attitude are two things you must do and have to hunt the areas here. You also have to have the courage to hike to new locations, glass and burn boot rubber. If driving is a factor in your decision, keep this in mind; most areas to hunt are anywhere from a half hour drive to a 3 hour drive – one way! There are many factors that I have to consider when planning for a hunt. I will share some of them here.

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Utilizing Maps

Maps and Boundaries
Maps can be a hunter’s best friend, so I scour maps all year; online and paper topos. My hunt preparation, no matter where I am going always includes maps. I usually start reviewing area in Google Earth because it’s easy to mark locations, east to share with your hunting buddies, and it’s free. I like topographic maps because I can review the terrain and more importantly locate water sources. Whether it’s a map printed off the internet or a topo, I always have a map of the location I am going with places highlighted to check out.

Forums and Other Hunters
Online forums and other hunters are a great source of information. Most hunters like to brag a little when it comes to finding a good spot, or animal, to hunt. When I first started out hunting in SoCal this is exactly what I did. I gathered as much Intel online that I could. I processed it, asked questions and verified that the areas where I wanted to scout were public land, legal to hunt and had a chance for finding animals. This is also a great way to meet other hunters who are looking for hunting partners or have land they are willing to allow you to hunt. Now don’t get your hopes up there, but it IS possible. With some browsing, phone calls and asking questions you CAN find private land to hunt that won’t cost you anything but a tank of gas to get there and back. It just takes perseverance and some work.\Trail Cameras and Scouting

 

PSE's Albert Quackenbush Utilizing Maps

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Trail Camera

An often daunting task is to find the deer on public land. Trail cameras and scouting are the very best ways of finding a shooter deer. The logical thing is to combine the two. Bring a trail camera or two when you go scouting and if you plan to set up some trail cams bring out your optics and glass. One of the challenges here is that your cameras will mostly be going on public land. Putting your cameras on public land will give you some great information, but the cameras seem to be a big target for thieves. Use common sense and don’t put them in easy to find places. Take the time to hide it, lock it up and take it down when you have the information you need.

Check Over Your Gear
Often overlooked is the shape of your gear, namely your bow, arrows, release and any electronics. I can tell you that having your gear fail on you will make your heart sink. I have had the misfortune of having a release seize up due to the dry, sandy conditions of the high desert and I have had my trigger fall right of my release while hunting. Fortunately, I have a backup release with me at all times, but that isn’t always true with a bow. I don’t always take a backup bow with me, so it’s a priority to go over it carefully and make sure it’s lubed, string is waxed, screws are tightened, and everything is in place.

Packing In and Packing Out
Lists can be a downfall for some people, but I thrive on making lists and planning. I like to be sure I have everything I am going to need for a hunt and that I haven’t left anything behind. I have been on a few hunts out here now and don’t make a list every time I go, but I have a good idea of what I will need. A few nights before a planned hunt, I will lay everything out and make certain it’s in the right place. It could be in my pack or in a tote to go in the truck, but it’s there. If I have to purchase something at the store I will know it long before the day of the hunt. Don’t wait until the last minute and realize you forgot an important piece of the puzzle.

Setting a Safety Net
An important feature I have added to my hunts is a safety net. Not a safety net in the literal sense, but I a plan in case something goes wrong or if someone needs to find me. I start by making sure to give my wife has a map of the area I am hunting. On that map I mark up the roads or trailheads we’ll be parking at and where we plan on hunting. I give here the directions I am taking to get there. If I am going hunting with my hunting partners, I am sure to give her their names, cell phones and email addresses should she not hear from me. I also give her times I will be going in and coming out. One feature that I must add to my plan is the local hospitals and their phone numbers. Hopefully she’ll never need to call, but in case she does it’ll be readily available.

PSE's Albert Quackenbush Utilizing Maps

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Six miles off the main road

There are many different ways to plan a hunt in Southern California. Every person has a certain approach to the way they plan out a hunt and each time may be slightly different. Even mine gets adjusted from time to time. It all depends on the person and the hunt itself. No matter what, have fun in the preparation and planning. The anticipation that builds through the planning of a hunt can be almost as good as the hunt itself. Almost.

Albert Quackenbush has been bowhunting for more than 28 years. He shares his adventures on his blog, SoCalBowhunter.com, and also writes for Bow Adventures e-magazine. He is a Pro Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com, Piranha Custom Bowstrings and Field Logic. He is a member of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, California Deer Association, and is a Life Member of the North American Hunting Club.

Albert was born and raised in New York State where he learned to hunt everything from squirrels to whitetail deer. He currently resides in Southern California with his wife and daughter and hunts year round.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Dustin Jones What to take with you on a Hunt.


By Dustin Jones
http://www.highcountrybowhunter.com/

Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones Adjusting Sight

There are so many different situations and different types of hunts that will require you to pack different things. With that being said, there are some things that I always pack with me regardless if it is just a morning hunt or a 5 day backcountry hunt; things that I feel are important to pack with me.

PSE's Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones Hydration Bladder & Filter

The first one that I always pack is water. No matter what type of hunting I am doing, I try to make sure I have plenty of drinking water. Shorter trips are easier to pack water for but for those longer trips I make sure to have a water filtration system with me. The water bladder I use has an inline water filter which allows me to fill it with stream water and ensures I have clean drinking water whenever.

I always take my camera with me as well. I don’t pack a bulky DSLR camera but a high quality compact camera can be found in my pack. Once you arrow that animal of a lifetime you’ll want to snap some great photos of the animal in the field. Also I enjoy taking pictures of the scenery. One of the best things about hunting is seeing nature at its finest. Enjoying those moments and being able to share them with family and friends or just hold onto them for you yourself is why I carry a camera with me.

Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones Bow Tool

Probably one of the most important things I have in my pack is a multi-tool to work on my bow. I carry it because you never know what can happen while you are out there. You may find a screw has come loose, or you notice something is off just enough to throw you off and you need to fix it. Packing a multi-tool will help save you from ending a hunt early.

Also knowing that whatever can happen may happen while hunting; I am sure to have a first aid kit. I’m not talking about a large, bulky kit that takes a lot of space but something small that has Band-Aids, gauze, tweezers, tape, and medications for pain as well as allergies. I personally pack duct tape because it has multiple uses and sticks very well to just about anything.

Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones Using Hydration Bladder To Cook

A GPS unit is helpful for either style of hunting. Whether it is a short morning hunt or a 5 day trip, the GPS can help you in multiple ways. You will be able to navigate your way around so you don’t get lost but also with a GPS you will be able to mark certain spots so you can return to them later on which is extremely helpful when tracking an animal. A lot of times while I’m out hunting I stumble upon a water hole or some new bedding areas that look very well used and promising that I would like to come back to. By marking them I will be able to return to them later on to give them a try.

These are some of the necessities that I pack with me on all of my hunts which I have found to be very useful. I don’t want to weigh my pack down on either type of hunt but I find these to be some of the most common things I pack with me.

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.

Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Will Jenkins – Where to place your trail cams


By Will Jenkins
http://www.thewilltohunt.com/

Move Your Cameras!
If you’re a deer hunter and you have a trail camera, you need to go put them over a scrape. Scrapes are popping up everywhere and being visited by bucks every night and soon during the day. Rubs are starting to show up as well as bucks are starting to get even more fired up for the rut.

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins Camera

Putting a trail camera over a scrape can do a lot in the way of helping you understand the buck activity on your property. As you can see from the pictures and video in this post all of the activity shown was within one week over one scrape! At one point I had 4 bucks hit the same scrape in one night. While you can’t hunt at night you can gain a lot of knowledge about those bucks and their habits. Simply by focusing on which direction the bucks tend to come from and considering the terrain in that direction you can get a good idea of where that deer is bedding during the day, feeding at night and what his main travel routes are.

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins Move Camera

All of these are key bits of information that can help you tag a great buck this season. If you don’t have a trail camera go get one, even a cheap one, and set it up over a scrape. Monitoring the deer activity in your area when you aren’t hunting can be really exciting and rewarding.

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins Trail Camera

Will Jenkins is creator of TheWilltoHunt.com and Harnesses For Hunters. He’s an avid outdoorsman who enjoys sharing his experiences through his blog. He also writes for Bow Adventures e-Magazine and is a member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association.

Will lives in Central Virginia with his wife and two kids. He hunts in Virginia and Maryland but has dreams of heading west to hunt Elk and Mule Deer.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Jared Bloomgren Favorite Places to Hunt


By Jared Bloomgren

Jared Bloomgren

PSE’s Jared Bloomgren Above 10,000 Ft.

I have been “blessed” to hunt numerous places over the years that range quite a bit in terrain. The arid dryness of the desert overseas, to the flat or rolling hills and open terrain of the prairie, to the dry, rugged badlands, to the rough, rugged, high elevation and unforgiving terrain of the mountains. I think three of the four are perfect, especially the farther I get away from the road hunters and trail systems. The hunting will just get better for me the farther I press on but often times harder as well but will always make it more rewarding in the end.

Jared Bloomgren

PSE’s Jared Bloomgren Ridge 11,000 Ft.

So where is my most favorite place to hunt? That can be a hard choice depending on my mood and what I am hunting but I continually find myself drawn to the rough, rugged, high elevation and unforgiving terrain of the mountains. It makes my lungs burn, my legs ache, my head pound because of loss of oxygen and the added thin air, but most of all it makes me feel like a true do it yourself hunter. There are fewer crowds of hunters in these areas and far more less chances of hearing that four wheeler bombing close to your set-up. But with that being said there are also a heck of a lot more dangers from the unknown elements that could be dealt to you at any given time. The wildlife in this area often times could make you out for lunch if they wanted. Not much you could do about it if they decided to either! Hunting in the mountains many miles from any road or trail system can really make you realize how insignificant you really are on this planet. You really are not at the top of the food chain if you stop and think about it. Other things that are very appealing about the high country or back-country is how close you feel you are to the stars. If you have never been above 12,000 feet on a mountain in total darkness with no wind you wouldn’t realize that you can almost touch some of those stars! And the number of stars there are…..oooooh myyyyyyyyyy GOD! Absolutely beautiful!

Jared Bloomgren

Jared Bloomgren Glassing from my mountain top perch

I like to hunt in places where there is solitude, places that offer such views that are absolutely breathe taking. These areas are often not trekked upon by most hunters because of the strenuous work it takes to get there. Coming home 25 pounds lighter after a 2 week back-country hunt is one heck of a diet as well! Not because I was malnourished, but because I worked my butt off! It is hunts like this that are very rewarding. The harder I work on a hunt, the more rewarding it is! So bring on the mountains every time!

Jared “J-Rod” Bloomgren is a hardcore Do-It-Yourself bowhunter who strives to better himself each year in the outdoor community. As a professional hunter, freelance writer and photographer, he likes to relive his outdoor adventures through written expression and photography making the reader feel as if they were along on the hunt. He attributes much of his success to the vital education he has learned from the various big game animals that he hunts. He is quoted as saying, “In each and every hunt, success or defeat, I learn something from every outing and that I can put in my arsenal of knowledge to use at a later date, a later date that will again put my wits against that of my prey.”

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson Hunting Alone


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Hunting Alone

Once and a while the question comes up as to whether or not I hunt alone. The short answer is usually, “no.” Mostly I hunt with my husband. Although, there have been a few times where I have ventured out on my own. These hunts have taken place in familiar areas, where cell service signals are not rare, and with my sidearm securely attached to my belt.

Ladies, if you are pondering the question of whether or not to hunt alone, there are few things you should consider…

The first thing to think about is the type of hunt you are preparing for, and the second factor is the location of your hunt. The type of hunting you prefer, e.g., tree-stand, blind, or spot and stalk, most likely will play a factor into whether or not as a female hunter you feel comfortable with solo hunting. The location in my opinion is a bigger factor. For example, I would not want to venture off on a 10 day back country wilderness hunt by myself. I think I could keep myself from getting lost since I’m usually not directionally challenged; however, I wouldn’t trust myself enough to stay safe. It would also not be an easy task getting the meat out. I am up for a lot of things, but not that type of challenge. I know there are options like drop camps and packing a satellite phone to call your coordinates in for someone to come pack out the meat, but it is still not something that interests me… at least doing it by myself. On the other hand, if I’m hunting deer and had a tree-stand hung and ready to go, I would have no qualms about sitting solo waiting for a white-tailed deer to walk by.

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson’s Hunt

In addition to the type and location of your hunt, here are a few other thoughts to consider prior to venturing off into the woods by yourself…

1. Do you have means to take care of the meat? Make sure you are prepared to gut your animal, or at least have a very good plan for getting a hold of someone quickly that can help. Is there cell service in your area? Remember, the meat is the trophy!

2. Since you are most likely either entering or leaving your hunting area in the dark, be aware of your surroundings. Even though you are armed with a bow, there is still potential for a bad situation to occur, e.g, other individuals with ill intentions, or even other predators in the woods. Be prepared!

3. Lastly, something that a lot of hunters don’t consider is the loneliness factor. This shouldn’t be a problem if you are doing a quick day trip, but if you are planning on spending several days by yourself in the wilderness, be prepared to start talking to yourself. Seriously. It is something that a lot of hunters may not admit, but being by yourself in the woods is not something easy to do. I’ve recently heard several hunters, who have experience in the back country, admit to this. Be prepared to deal with the loneliness factor, e.g., bring a journal or good book to help pass the hours.

PSE's Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson

The urge to venture off into the woods and tag an animal by myself frequently tries to convince me I should. The romance of it all temps me. My “I can do it” attitude threatens to override my common sense, but this urge is quickly replaced by reality and I’m brought back quickly to my senses. In my opinion, hunting with a friend or spouse somehow increases the joy in the hunt. When someone fills a tag, there are friends for high-fiving and helping with the skin, gut and pack out job. Everyone pitches in to take care of the meat. Usually, my part of the team-work is in loading an animal on pack frames and carrying it off the mountain (after the skinning and gutting). It is the part of the process I enjoy the most. The burn in your legs and lungs somehow doesn’t matter or slow me down. The momentary pain can’t stop the smile from creeping over my face due to the knowledge of all the future meals that are loaded on my pack frame. The thought of backstraps and tenderloins is all the motivation I need to take that next step.

Yes, I think I’ll continue to hunt with family and friends… it makes the experience more enjoyable! What about you? Do you prefer solo hunts or group hunts? Why?

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Hunting Deer in NY vs. CA


By Albert Quackenbush
SoCalBowhunter.com

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush SoCal Hunting Landscape

Bow hunting for whitetail deer is awesome! It is one of my most favorite things to do. I was surrounded by it growing up. Quite often I am asked how hunting in Southern California differs from hunting back in New York State. In all honesty, there are many similarities with a DIY whitetail hunt in New York and a DIY blacktail hunt in California. That being said, there are also dramatic differences to consider. They are both skittish cervids and are intelligent creatures. Factors like weather, huntable land and animal characteristics are much greater once you have had the chance to experience them in California. That being said, if you put your mind to it and use the same principals for a whitetail hunt, you can hunt Southern California blacktail.

Hunting farmland in Upstate NY made for some great hunting opportunities. More often than not, the farmer was planting crops and had an ongoing supply of food for the deer population. We could glass a field in the evening and see if the deer were feeding. Whether it be a clover field or freshly cut corn field, you could spot the deer pretty easily. Based on your intel, you could go into the area where they came from or were going to and set up a treestand or ground blind. In the foothills and high desert of Southern California the deer are constantly on the move and food plots aren’t something we are allowed by law to plant. The best thing to look for is water. Finding a water source begins by reviewing maps and then hiking out and actually finding them prior to hunting season. If you can find a water source you are in good shape to begin your scouting. In California, you can’t sit over water for more than 30 minutes, so you have to come up with alternative strategies. Just like the food plots or corn fields on a farm, finding where the deer are coming from when they come in to drink will give you an advantage.

When I was exclusively hunting whitetail deer, the first thing we would do every year was look for game trails and fresh sign. We’d look for tracks, rub lines and scrapes. Hunting blacktails in SoCal is similar in some ways. Once I get to an area I use my optics and glass the terrain. I look for animals that silhouette themselves or are bedded down in the shade of a manzanita bush. If I can’t find an animal I look for game trails. Out here you can usually see them zig-zagging along a foothill or running near a ridge. Then I try to find tracks going to or coming from that area.

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush- Bedded Pacific-Hybrid buck taken through binoculars

Getting as far away from the hunting population as you can is one of the keys to success. This rings true for both NY and CA. Hunting whitetails in New York, you want to be far enough away from other hunters for a few reasons. First and foremost, your safety. Second, you want the least amount of pressure on the animals to give you the best chance of success. Most Southern California hunters will not venture more than a couple miles on foot to find a spot. Add in steep terrain, lack of water, and shade and you lose another percentage. If you can find a remote, hard to access area you are off to a good start. This is also a good place to start glassing for animals. Personally, the farther I can get away from other hunters and see animals the happier I am. I know that most of the bigger animals are far from roads and people. No matter what, it will not be easy, but it will be worth the effort.

Weather seems to be a major factor to people and it does come into play, but for different reasons. The weather in NY can be very fickle. You might find snow in the morning and then have 80 degrees by afternoon. I’ve experienced this first hand and while that is an extreme case, it does happen. It can do the same thing in California. You can have 30 degrees in the morning and by noon the mercury is reaching 100 degrees. Let me focus on the California heat for a second. I have no problem hunting in the heat. Sure, you need plenty of water and sunscreen, but I have found deer moving at all times of the day out here. They will gravitate toward the shade of trees and bushes, but they do move. The major drawback in hunting the heat is making sure that if you are able to fill your tag you field dress and get the animal cooled as quickly as possible. When you are three miles deep in the forest that can be very hard to do. I will ask any hunter to please consider the care of your animal before taking the shot.

A major difference I have found is the proximity in which you can hunt. In New York, I was able to hit the woods with my dad and brother for the first three hours of the day. We’d park ourselves in a treestand and wait, and wait, and wait. Then, usually around 9:00 AM, we’d convene at the truck and head back down the road for breakfast. Over bacon, eggs and coffee we would talk strategy and be back out in the woods within an hour or two. In California, especially where I live, I need to drive at least forty minutes just to get to a trailhead. Then I have to hike in a few miles to where I am going to start glassing and wait for sunrise. For those reasons, I usually plan on staying out all day. Also, patterning the SoCal blacktail in the areas I hunt has proven difficult. Sure, I have figured out the main trails they use and what time if day they may walk through an area, but 99% of those deer are does and fawns. Locating a mature blacktail is a challenge. You see, in most of the areas out here you cannot harvest a doe. I know, it sounds crazy right? We can pull certain tags that allow us to get a buck or a doe, but they are limited.

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Whitetail

Whether you are hunting in New York, California, or any other area, you have to your research, but that doesn’t mean you can’t have fun. The harder you work, the sweeter it will be when you can fill that tag and look back at the effort you made. Make some friends, plan some hunts, and just enjoy the outdoors. Any day I can get out and enjoy the outdoors is a good day in my book. Happy hunting!

Albert Quackenbush has been bowhunting for more than 28 years. He shares his adventures on his blog, SoCalBowhunter.com, and also writes for Bow Adventures e-magazine. He is a Pro Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com, Piranha Custom Bowstrings and Field Logic. He is a member of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, California Deer Association, and is a Life Member of the North American Hunting Club.

Albert was born and raised in New York State where he learned to hunt everything from squirrels to whitetail deer. He currently resides in Southern California with his wife and daughter and hunts year round.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Dustin Jones How to Start out in Bowhunting


By Dustin Jones
HighCountryBowhunter.com

PSE's Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones- Evo

When you are just starting to get into bowhunting, it can be a little overwhelming. But the key is not to let that get the best of you. I have introduced several friends of mine into bowhunting and they have loved every minute of it.

The most obvious piece of equipment that you will need is a bow. The best thing you can do is find one that fits you and that you are comfortable shooting. When you are first starting out, there are great ready to shoot bow packages that include the bow, sight, quiver, and rest which helps relieve some of the stress about choosing the right set of accessories for your bow.

Once you have picked out a bow that is the time to start practicing. Get very familiar with your bow and practice often. The most important thing to remember about practicing is make sure you are putting in the effort when you do. Don’t just practice for the sake of practicing. When you shoot your bow, make sure you are consistent in your shooting motion to reduce making mistakes while hunting.

PSE's Dustin

PSE’s Dustin Jones Bow

The most important thing you should do is learn the regulations for the state that you are hunting. Know what paperwork must be done. Take your bowhunters education course to become familiar the rules. It is important to know the laws as well as understanding the unit boundaries. I know where I hunt here locally; in certain units I can only hunt whitetails while in others I can hunt both mule deer and whitetail. Later in the season on one side of the road you can hunt with a rifle while the other side of the road is archery only. So paying attention to the rules and regulations is very important to save you from having expensive fines and suspension of your hunting license.

Lastly, have fun. There will be a learning curve but go out there and just relax. You may not get an animal your first year out hunting, but enjoy the fact that you are out there hunting. As you are just getting started you will make mistakes, but as you continue practicing and getting out hunting you will learn how to minimize them. You will learn what works and what doesn’t work while hunting and having those close encounters and failed attempts. Who knows, maybe you’ll get out there for your first hunt and arrow a monster!

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.

Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Will Jenkins Basic Bow Maintenance & Care


By  Will Jenkins
http://www.thewilltohunt.com

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins Bow Maintenance

No matter the price of your bow it’s still an investment and it only makes sense to take care of the investment. The better care you take of your bow the longer it will stand up to the abuse of hunting.

Your strings and cables will break down faster than anything on your bow. Keeping them lubricated with string wax is important to their longevity. Some people put wax on every single time they shoot. Maybe I shoot too often but that just causes build up for me. I put wax on my strings ever 2nd or 3rd time I shoot. Make sure you use a decent brand of wax that is soft and after you apply it rub up and down the string with your fingers to warm the wax and incorporate it into the string.

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins Strings and Cables

There is also a lot of information out there on how often to change your strings and cables. Some people say you must change them every year while others say it’s not a big deal change them ever 3 or 4. It really all depends on the quality of the strings, how much you shoot and what kind of exposure they get. By exposure I mean do you leave it baking in the sun through a window most of the time or do you take it out in rain several times a year. If you shoot weekly or even daily you’ll need to change them sooner and the same if you bought the cheapest strings you could find. My recommendation is to start with quality strings. Personally I only use local custom string makers that I know and trust. However, there are a ton of reputable brands out there. With the amount I shoot and hunt I won’t let my strings go more than two years. Even if you don’t shoot much I wouldn’t go past two years on a string. Over time they can break down and stretch no matter how much or little you paid for them and can end up out of spec and you won’t even know it. For example I purchased a bow from a friend a few years ago. He warned me that he wasn’t sure but he thought the string was only a year old. The string looked brand new and the bow shot fine so I shot it for a couple months before putting new strings on it. Even though the strings were a decent brand and looked basically brand new they had stretched 3 inches! This was robbing the bow of proper performance. So in summation, don’t let your strings go for more than 2 years and if you are very abusive on your equipment every year is probably a good idea. I’d rather be safe than sorry!

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins String & Cable Maintenance

The axles only need to be lubricated infrequently. This means whenever you have your strings changed make sure your bow technician lubes it up and you’re good to go. If you plan to hunt in the rain wipe it off as soon as you’re done and you can even apply some string wax to hardware that may be prone to rusting prior to going out. The only other consideration is storage. While bows are durable if exposed to intense heat such as being left in the car on a hot summer day the limbs can delaminate and cause permanent damage. I personally keep my bow in the house on a hook in my closet. Lastly, do not dry fire your bow.

Hopefully those few tips will help your bow last for years and years to come!

Will Jenkins is creator of TheWilltoHunt.com and Harnesses For Hunters. He’s an avid outdoorsman who enjoys sharing his experiences through his blog. He also writes for Bow Adventures e-Magazine and is a member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association.

Will lives in Central Virginia with his wife and two kids. He hunts in Virginia and Maryland but has dreams of heading west to hunt Elk and Mule Deer.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Jared Bloomgren Advantages & Disadvantages of fixed or mechanical broadheads


By Jared Bloomgren

Jared Bloomgren Wac'em Triton

PSE’s Jared Bloomgren Wac’em Triton

Each and every year there are new and “improved” broadheads hitting the market that are supposed to be sharper, stronger, and more accurate than previous models. Many archers go through various broadhead brands and types almost like toilet paper in the neighborhood out-house after a chili feed! I am much different and have found a head that flat out gets it done for me and has numerous years now without letting me down. Of course it is a replaceable blade head and I choose to stick with this style of head for various reasons.

Which is better, fixed/replaceable blade or mechanical heads? This is a question that can get as heated as any political campaign out there when brought up at the wrong time at a pro shop or hunting camp. The argument will go on and on for decades to come I am sure. Or until exploding tips are legal to use…..who knows! Keep in mind that the following is merely opinion and facts based on my own trials with various heads in today’s market. This is a topic that will either earn me some fans or will turn some away. At any rate let’s get to it…..

Let’s look at advantages of both: Like stated previously, I prefer a replaceable blade head for many reasons. The advantages include but are not limited to: strength, replaceable blades to maintain a sharp cutting surface, better penetration, and more confidence in the equipment that I use. The advantages of a mechanical head are improved accuracy with field tip flight characteristics, less wind drag, many now have replaceable blades, bigger cutting diameter, and the sharp blades are often not exposed while not in use thus increasing safety.

Jared Bloomgren

PSE’s Jared Bloomgren Wac’em Triton XL

Now disadvantages: Replaceable or fixed blade heads often times will not fly as true as a field tip, the blades can cause the arrow to guide off path from a field tip. Mechanical heads have many more disadvantages. Keep in mind this is from my own trials and experiments! In my opinion a mechanical head will rob you of momentum and kinetic energy in order to get those blades to open. This is actually a fact, not just my opinion. Not a big deal to many considering they are way up in the numbers when it comes to KE and momentum. I also think that mechanical heads perform best when given the perfect scenario such as a perfect quartering shot. Why is that? Because no matter what mechanical head you look at on the market, it will cause an arrow to lose some energy when that arrow strikes a surface at an angle. The arrow does not want to continue in a straight line, it wants to kick to the side to open those blades. This causes a loss of energy. When I am shooting at an animal I want extreme confidence in my broadheads. Some states do not allow mechanical heads for elk. I want to use the same head for all my game!

Many believe that a replaceable or fixed blade head will never fly like a field tip. Well I would like to invite you over someday and I will shoot a field tip and any one of my broadheads side by side at yardages out to 120 yards or better to prove my point that it is indeed possible. With a well tuned bow and accessories and the correct spine arrow many (but not all) of this type of heads will fly like field tips. That is why I will always choose a replaceable or fixed blade any day over a mechanical.

To each their own. There are some very reliable mechanical heads on the market. At this time I am not 100% sold on them and will continue to shoot what I have most confidence in. My tried and true replaceable blade heads.

Jared “J-Rod” Bloomgren is a hardcore Do-It-Yourself bowhunter who strives to better himself each year in the outdoor community. As a professional hunter, freelance writer and photographer, he likes to relive his outdoor adventures through written expression and photography making the reader feel as if they were along on the hunt. He attributes much of his success to the vital education he has learned from the various big game animals that he hunts. He is quoted as saying, “In each and every hunt, success or defeat, I learn something from every outing and that I can put in my arsenal of knowledge to use at a later date, a later date that will again put my wits against that of my prey.”

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson Preparing For Your Hunt


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com

PSE's Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson on a Hunt

Prior to a hunt, there is always plenty of planning to do. While some are managing land, planting food plots and setting up tree stands, my hunts typically take place on public land in the mountains. Therefore, I can’t speak towards the former type of hunt preparation. However, I can tell you about the latter and how we plan for our hunts out west.

In my opinion, the first thing to do if planning a hunt in the mountains is to make sure you are physically prepared. While I don’t think it is absolutely necessary to be able to run marathons, but anything you do to increase your lung capacity and strength will definitely help, especially if you are not used to the altitude. Plus, ladies, it is always fun to be able to out hike the guys!

PSE's Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Hunting Necessities

Second, make sure that you have all the gear needed. Start making lists! If you are planning a backcountry hunt where you pack in all your gear on your back or on horses, it is extremely important to make sure you have all you need. And then, pack your backpack ahead of time. However, if you are bringing a camper that changes things a bit. When hunting elk, we typically bring everything including the kitchen sink if we our hunting out of a camper… including the grill, which makes it nice for grilling fresh backstraps! I still carry around a backpack each day, even though we have camper for sleeping in each night. This allows us to easily stay out all day if necessary.

Here is a breakdown of what is included in my pack on elk hunts. I don’t think there is much difference for girls and guys in what is included, but you be the judge…

Backpack contents for day trips (usually elk hunting):
1. Heat packs
2. Snacks
3. Elk pee (scent wafers) & safety pin to hang on a tree
4. Extra layer of clothes – usually long johns and extra t-shirt for pack out trips
5. Matches
6. Game bag
7. Green cat eyes for walking out in the dark
8. Water
9. Toilet paper
10. Hunting license
11. Camera
NOTE: Since I wear cargo pants, a lot of my other supplies are safely tucked in all the pockets, which also makes things easy when getting ready for an early morning hunt. (Pockets contain: chapstick, range finder, elk calls, wind check and gloves)

Of course, there are a few obvious things missing, but they are safely tucked in my husband’s pack… knives, rope and gps

So…. do you have any special ritual or planning you do in advance of a hunt?

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Enter to win a 2013 PSE X-FORCE DREAM SEASON DNA!


Enter to win a 2013 PSE X-FORCE DREAM SEASON DNA!

Enter to win a 2013 PSE X-FORCE DREAM SEASON DNA!

Go to http://bit.ly/winpsedna to enter to win a 2013 PSE X-FORCE DREAM SEASON DNA! Link does not work for mobile entry. Computer only.


2013 PSE FleX Cable Slide Technology


PSE FleX Cable Slide Technology

2013 PSE Technology – FleX Cable Slide

PSE FleX Cable Slide Technology

  • Uses the same technology and manufacturing process as our PSE X Technology limbs for outstanding durability
  • Reduces lateral load by 30% for decreased torque at full draw
  • Adjustable offset allows cable clearance using different size arrows and fletchings

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

2013 PSE Technology – FleX Cable Slide

Break Your Silhouette For “Spot And Stalk”


By Pedro Ampuero
AdventurousBowhunter.com

Pedro Ampuero

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero Spot and Stalk

Almost all the hunting I make is “spot and stalk”, with roe deer even more often “Walk and Stalk” in which you walk through the forest until you spot the animal, which is typically almost at shooting distance. For being successful, is a must that you break your silhouette in order to detect the animals before they detect you.

For this purpose, one thing it has been much more effective for me, is to use macro pattern camos, which really break your silhouette at any distance. Sometimes with more classic camo patterns, which have a high detail level, they look great at close distances, but as soon as you get farther than 30 yards you cannot see the detail and it all looks like one brown piece.

Pedro Ampuero

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero Hunting

My philosophy is to focus more on not looking like a human, than trying to look like a tree. Animals relation the humans to some vertical lines which an average height etc.. Trying to break those lines is the key, specially the lines made by our shoulder and head. For this I use a ghillie hat, but I just leave it over my shoulders, to unify the shape of my head and shoulders. Using a typical cowboy hat is also a great way of breaking that shape.

Pedro Ampuero

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero Face Paint

The last important thing is to camo your lighter parts, like hands and face. Animals spot our white face as good as we spot the white parts of deer in the woods. We all know our life would be much harder if deer wouldn’t have white patches on the tail area. For that I typically use a facemask, or pain my face when the weather is warmer. I also use thin gloves for my hands, measuring, drawing the bow, glassing, etc.. All involves hand movement, and it is always easily detected by deer.

PSE's Pedro Ampuero

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero

It would be great to know your own experiences. Hope you find it of interest, and good luck all in the mountains!
Pedro Ampuero

Pedro is a mechanical engineer by trade and a bowhunter by heart. He is the co-founder of the blog AdventurousBowhunter.com and Cazandoconarco.es and has written many articles for the hunting industry and currently collaborates with the most prestigious companies on the industry.

 

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Albert Quackenbush -Baptism in Southern California


By Albert Quackenbush
http://socalbowhunter.blogspot.com/

Baptism in SoCal

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Baptism in SoCal

When I moved to California in 2006 I wasn’t sure what to expect. I had no friends here. I knew nothing at all about the hunting here and I was afraid. I’ll be the first to admit that I was fearful because there was so much unknown to me. After asking around, I found a local archery club that met a mile from my apartment and thought I was saved. I showed up with my bow set up for hunting out of a treestand. Right away I was told to either get a bow that would allow me to shoot farther or plan on going back to NY to hunt each year. At first, I was more than discouraged, but it began to toughen me up. When I asked the hunters in the group where I might go to get started not a single one would help me. I can’t blame them as they had worked hard to find their own spots and now I had to do it. The archery range where I shoot beckons people from all over and I took it upon myself to approach archers and start asking those questions. I would walk up to them, introduce myself and share what I was trying to do. It wasn’t until I met a young man and his son that I felt I had my first nugget of information. He shared with me a spot to go try and while it would be tough to hunt, it would give me an idea of what hunting was like out here.

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Searching for Huntable Areas

My equipment also needed an upgrade. The bow I had wasn’t cutting for Western hunting. I started asking around; scouring the internet and finally found a bow I wanted to try out. I met the seller at his house and he produced a well-cared for PSE Vengeance compound bow. I had never seen a Vengeance, let alone shoot one. This man helped me in a way he’ll never know. First, we talked and then he insisted I shoot the bow before buying it. While that should be a normal thing to do, I know many people who do not and I was one of them at the time. So I shot it. It felt like it was made just for me. It was a little on the heavier side from what I was used to, but it was a well-built bow with power. As we talked, the man shared that he and his son hunted and that if I ever had any questions or wanted to tag along I was welcome. That gave me hope! While I never did tag along, I am thankful for his support!

During my search for updated equipment, I found another gentleman selling some arrows. Little did I know that this chance meeting would turn into a friendship that would lead to a hunting partner. The purchase of the arrows lead to deeper conversation about hunting in California and hunting partners. It turns out that his partner left for the wilds of Oregon and he was partnerless. We rectified that and within the next couple weeks we were out scouting the area. Some of the areas were not only beautiful, but were exactly what I needed to find.

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Boots

Hunting out here is just as much about finding huntable land and wearing out boot rubber as it is to knowing the regulations and laws. Knowing the season dates should be a given, but there are multiple regulations between different game animals, weaponry, and borderlines of private and public land. I review the regulations and fish & game code often to be certain I am hunting the right area, during the right time, with the proper weapon.

Another factor that I hadn’t bargained for are the rattlesnakes. Unlike many people, I think rattlesnakes are very interesting creatures. Snakes are awesome in my opinion. That being said, rattlers can stay awesome from a good distance and not underfoot! They are everywhere out here and while you may never see one, you still have to protect yourself. Wearing snake boots has become the norm for me. Hopefully my encounters with them will be few and far between.

SoCal

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush SoCal

My advice to anyone wanting to hunt California, or anywhere for that matter, is to ask as many questions as you can. You might be afraid, but everyone has a slight degree of fear. The worst thing anyone can say is ‘No.’ Find the right person and you may gain access to some prime hunting land or land yourself a good friend. The hard work has paid off for me and I know it will for you, too.

Albert Quackenbush has been bowhunting for more than 28 years. He shares his adventures on his blog, SoCalBowhunter.com, and also writes for Bow Adventures e-magazine. He is a Pro Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com, Piranha Custom Bowstrings and Field Logic. He is a member of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, California Deer Association, and is a Life Member of the North American Hunting Club.

Albert was born and raised in New York State where he learned to hunt everything from squirrels to whitetail deer. He currently resides in Southern California with his wife and daughter and hunts year round.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Dustin Jones How I’m starting My hunting Season


By Dustin Jones
HighCountryBowhunter.com

PSE's Dustin

PSE’s Dustin Jones Hunting

Every year there is that time of year that every hunter looks forward too. That time of year is magical. The temperature begins to cool down, leaves change color, and the day dreaming begins. I look forward to hunting season and fall in general. It is my favorite time of year. There is just something about all the colors changing and the leaves falling that gets me going. This year though was a little different.

I was excited for this hunting season just like any other, but there was something that had me even more excited. My wife and I were expecting our second son just before the opening weekend of archery season. There is nothing I enjoy more than being a good father to my kids as well as being a good husband to my wife. That is where the challenge came into play. How was I going to manage my time with my family with a newborn a few days before the archery season?

 Dustin Jones & Dawson

PSE’s Dustin Jones & Dawson

As much as I wanted to be out on opening weekend of the archery season I spent the opening weekend with my family. As difficult as I thought it was going to be to be sitting around not hunting, I was actually a lot more relaxed and happy to spend time with my family. I spent some good quality time at home until I think I drove my wife a little crazy and she told me I should go hunting. So I took to the woods.

I have both an elk tag and two deer tags that were burning a hole in my pocket. I was able to get out to hunt some deer in my tree stand which is pretty close to home, as well as a three day elk hunting trip that we spent hiking and chasing elk. I have been scouting a couple new areas recently and have had some great trail camera pictures of some nice elk in this new area and some awesome whitetails in this other area. I have had several close encounters with elk this year.

PSE's Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones Searching For Elk

I was caught off guard by a good little 5 point as we were walking into our hunting spot. We had just started walking down the trail and heard something moving so we had stopped to see what it was. Sure enough just below us we see a nice little 5×5 bull elk standing broadside at 50 yards. I slowly knocked an arrow, clipped on the release, and began to draw. This whole time we were standing in the wide open with no cover in front of us. I was just setting the pin right behind the front shoulder when he turned and bolted. I was a little upset but was glad to have been able to see an elk and only 150 yards from where we parked the vehicle. I’ve been starting my season a little slower than what I usually do but I have been able to get out and see deer and elk while balancing time with my family!

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.

Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Will Jenkins Starting the Season Off


By Will Jenkins
http://www.thewilltohunt.com/

Will Jenkins

Rob with Velvet

This year I was super excited to start my hunting season as I was starting it a whole month earlier than I ever had. I had several invitations to hunt in Maryland so I took advantage of those invitations and started hunting on September 7th. Maryland’s season doesn’t usually open until September 15th but they opened earlier this year. With Virginia always starting in October I’ve never really had the opportunity to sit in a tree stand when it was in the 80’s. It was hot but a good time! While I didn’t fill a tag on opening day my friend Rob who I was hunting with tagged a very nice 8-point in full velvet as well as a doe. I couldn’t have been more excited for him! The other great thing about hunting Maryland this year is they have opened quite a few Sundays for hunting. Hunting on Sunday in Virginia is still strictly banned while in Maryland they have started to open certain Sundays in specific counties.

Will Jenkins

Will Jenkins Backstrap

The following week I was able to kill what I thought was a small doe but ended up being a button buck still in velvet. The shot wasn’t great due to a pesky spike that kept chasing the deer off. As I was squeezing the trigger he lunged at the button buck causing him to lurch forward as I was shooting making a less than perfect shot. With and arrows covered in a little blood and a lot of gut along with no blood trail I came back the next morning. Within about 45 minutes of looking I found him piled u and the meat was still good! However, in my race against rising temperatures I didn’t get a chance to snap any trophy pictures before he was in the cooler.

The Virginia bow season opened on October 6th. I’ve gotten access to a new property by my house as well as the same properties I had last year. The deer density is nothing like it is Maryland. Hopefully this year I will actually be able to kill a deer in Virginia! Right now my hit list is pretty scarce. I’m not a huge trophy hunter but if he steps out I’ll send an arrow his way! I’ve gotten pictures of some decent little basket 8 point bucks, but I’ve also gotten pictures of a monster 6 point that is huge. Talking to people in the area no one even knew he existed and I’ve never gotten a picture of him during the day time so hopefully he’ll slip up during the rut!

Will Jenkins

Will Jenkins Big Six Side View

So that’s how I’ll be kicking of my hunting season. I hope to follow this post with several successful hunts with some great images of deer falling to a PSE bow!

Will Jenkins is creator of TheWilltoHunt.com and Harnesses For Hunters. He’s an avid outdoorsman who enjoys sharing his experiences through his blog. He also writes for Bow Adventures e-Magazine and is a member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association.

Will lives in Central Virginia with his wife and two kids. He hunts in Virginia and Maryland but has dreams of heading west to hunt Elk and Mule Deer.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


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