Welcome!

Posts tagged “Phillip Dalrymple

PSE’s Phillip Dalrymple and His Antelope Buck with the Heart-Shaped Antlers


antelope buck

antelope buck

Editor’s Note: Phillip Dalrymple of Tucson, Arizona, and his family had a history with Jennings bows. For Dalrymple to break from the tradition of shooting Jennings bows and start shooting PSE bows back in 1983 was almost a major family problem. But since the switch, he’s never looked back – and today is one of the nation’s top bowhunters.

One of the reasons I started shooting PSE bows was because of Tracy Hardy. Tracy and I shot an archery tournament together when I was about 20-years old. I’d gotten out of high school and was going to college part time when I went to an archery tournament and met Tracy and his dad. They were pretty well known around Tucson, Arizona, but I’d never met them previously. He and I shot in the same group during this tournament. Tracy had one of the very first PSE Vector bows. Because I was shooting in the same group with Tracy, I saw how fast – scary-fast – the Vector was compared to the bow I was shooting – the Jennings Shooting Star. Tracy was shooting 5-pounds less draw weight than me, and his bow was 25-feet-per second faster than mine. Tracy and I became friends after that shoot, and we’re business partners today. When I saw how good Tracy could shoot the PSE Vector, and then when I shot the Vector, I had to have one.

Fifteen years later Tracy and I both drew an antelope tag. Back then there was a walk-in area that you could hunt where the archery world’s record antelope had been taken. A lot of the top-10 antelopes in the world were also taken from this region, a ranch that the public could hunt. But you have to walk-in to hunt and can’t take a motorized vehicle there. Sometimes you have to walk a long way before you start hunting. We drew these tags in 2000. I spent a lot of time before the hunt setting-up blinds and digging pits to hunt from, betting on the antelope coming to water and then our shooting the antelope as they came in to drink. I also spent time getting to know the rancher. He’d shown me two or three really-giant antelopes that were living on the property. I had put in a lot of time and effort to try and take a big antelope off this land.

However, 2-weeks before the hunt, this region had torrential rains. Water was in every little depression, so the antelopes didn’t have to go to the water holes where I’d set-up the blinds and the pits. Tracy showed-up the night before the hunt and took a giant antelope the second day of the hunt. I had put-in all the work during the summer to make sure we had good blinds and pits to hunt from, and Tracy took a giant antelope and went home.

Two years later, I drew a tag again, and because this place had had a lot of dry weather, the antelope didn’t grow nearly as big horns as they had the year before. But I did find one really-cool buck that the tips of his horns curled-in and formed heart shapes. Tracy got within 50 yards of this buck and drew his PSE bow to make the shot. But as he came to full draw, somehow a twig got between the string and the cam, and just as he released the arrow, the buck heard a sharp snap. So Tracy’s shot missed the antelope. The buck turned, looked where the arrow had hit the ground and bolted. Tracy missed his only chance to take this nice buck, because he had a Wyoming elk tag and had to leave after he missed the Arizona antelope buck. Three days later I saw this same buck bed-down at the top of a draw. I put a stalk on him. When I released the arrow from my PSE Thunderbolt One Cam bow, the buck stood-up and took the arrow in his leg. The buck had moved at the absolutely wrong time. But I didn’t want to leave a wounded animal, and I stayed after him the rest of the day. Finally he lay-down in another spot, and I got close-enough to take the shot. As sick as I was about wounding this antelope, I really felt good that I’d stayed after this buck all day long and finally taken him at the end of the day. This hunt was one of my most-memorable hunts ever. The first shot I took at the buck was at 60 yards. The second shot, when I finally put the buck down, was at 75 yards. I knew that was the only shot I would be able to get on this buck, and I felt confident in making it. The buck was wounded, and I wanted to take him and not leave him. The buck never heard or saw the arrow, and it struck him in the top half of the back and went through his chest. He was curled-up away from me when I shot. When antelope are lying down, and you’re shooting from that great a distance, the arrow has to come down from its back and move forward – similar to the arrow flight of a bow shot from a tree stand. When the arrow hit the buck, he only traveled about 20 yards from the bed where he’d been. I had traveled 2-1/2-miles from where I’d shot the buck the first time to where I finally took it.

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Phillip Dalrymple’s 52-Inch Caribou


Phillip Dalrymple

Phillip Dalrymple



Editor’s Note:
Phillip Dalrymple of Tucson, Arizona, and his family had a history with Jennings bows. For Dalrymple to break from the tradition of shooting Jennings bows and start shooting PSE bows back in 1983 was almost a major family problem. But since the switch, he’s never looked back – and today is one of the nation’s top bowhunters.

In 2005, John Shepley of PSE put together a big friends and family kind of hunt with Safari Nordik in Quebec, Canada. On the first afternoon, Corky Richardson, his dad George and I were able to get out on a caribou hunt. Corky decided he was going to film the first day and hunt the second day. We were trying to get episodes for the TV show. Corky and I tried to sneak in and get a shot on this caribou bull. He didn’t really have wide antlers, but he had incredibly palmated antlers. George decided to stay back and not interfere with our stalk. George stood on a steep trail and watched us make the stalk. I think he knew that Corky and I probably would spook the caribou, which we did. The caribou walked right by George, and he shot him with his PSE bow. This was a really nice caribou that made Pope & Young. A few people shot caribou with rifles, but almost everybody hunted with a bow.

With the licenses we had, we could have shot 36 caribou during a period of 5 days with 18 hunters. We actually took 32 caribou on the hunt. For some of the people on the hunt, these caribou were the first big game animals they had taken. After George took his caribou, we spotted a big bull with double main beams. This caribou was the first I’d ever seen with double main beams. So, Corky and I went after him. When we finally reached the spot where we thought we could cut the caribou off as he was feeding, I was able to get off a shot and take that double-main-beamed bull. Even though he wouldn’t make the record book, he was so unusual that he made a fine trophy for me.

The next day was Corky’s day to hunt, and we were seeing lots of caribou. So, I started filming Corky. We found this large group of caribou coming down off a ridge, feeding down toward the river. We got on this little point where below us was a basin. Caribou were coming around the point and down toward the basin. The caribou were splitting the point, with one group going to the left and the other group going to the right, passing from 20 to 35 yards on both sides of us. I kept pointing out caribou that I thought Corky ought to shoot. Corky kept turning down every caribou I suggested he shoot. Finally, he said, “Look up on the hill!” There was a caribou on the hill that had a 52-inch inside spread of the main beam. He was incredible! He was unlike any other caribou we’d seen. He had the widest spread of any caribou out of the thousands of animals we’d seen.

We waited and waited for the caribou to come down, so Corky could get a shot, but he didn’t. That caribou turned and went in a different direction with a couple of other bulls. We chased that caribou over 10 different ridges to try to catch up to him, traveling over a mile. Finally the big bull and the other bulls with him lay down to rest. They were in a little bowl and didn’t give us any way to approach them without being seen or smelled. There was no way we could get close enough to shoot. Corky finally said, “Look, we’re not going to get that caribou. Let’s forget about filming. You go in one direction and hunt, and I’ll go in the other direction. We’ll film tomorrow. I don’t see any reason for you not to hunt, because we’re not going to get the caribou we came after.”

So, we split up. I finally lay down and took a nap. When I woke up I didn’t know where Corky was. Someone decided to sneak in and try to take that big bull bedded down in the bowl, but they spooked the caribou out of the bowl. When I woke up, I spotted a nice bull slowly feeding down a basin and he stopped at 25 yards. I was at full draw, getting ready to shoot this caribou, when I saw the big wide bull that Corky and I had left in the bowl. Instead of aiming and taking the caribou I meant to take, I waited for the chance to take the 52-inch wide caribou. When he came by me, I shot him with my PSE Vengeance. When Corky saw that I’d taken the big bull he and I had chased together, he said, “You shot that bull out from under me.” And, even today, he still tells people that I took the bull he was supposed to take. The bull was 52-inches wide but had some deductions, because he was too wide. He was a Pope and Young caribou that scored 340 points.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Phillip Dalrymple and His Antelope Buck with the Heart-Shaped Antlers

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Phillip Dalrymple’s Hunt for the Bison


Phillip Dalrymple

Phillip Dalrymple

Editor’s Note: Phillip Dalrymple of Tucson, Arizona, and his family had a history with Jennings bows. For Dalrymple to break from the tradition of shooting Jennings bows and start shooting PSE bows back in 1983 was almost a major family problem. But since the switch, he’s never looked back – and today is one of the nation’s top bowhunters.

Arizona is one of the few states with a true wild herd of American bison (buffalo). These bison move in and out of a wilderness area on the Kaibab Plateau on the north rim of the Grand Canyon. These bison also go into the Grand Canyon National Park to get away from people who are trying to hunt them. The Grand Canyon National Park is home-free for the bison, because you can’t hunt there. The Kaibab Plateau has a big reputation in Arizona for producing monster-sized mule deer. The buffalo at the Kaibab Plateau are considered wild, and you can have a fair-chase hunt there. Since that hunt, I’ve learned that this hunt is an all fair-chase, because the buffalo have a better chance of getting away from you than you have of getting close enough to take a shot.

I originally started hunting the Kaibab Plateau with Corky Richardson in 2002 when Corky had drawn a tag to hunt there. We hunted for four or five days in the snow to try to find his buffalo. I crossed over to the east side of the Kaibab Plateau where the House Rock Wildlife Area is. I finally located a couple of bulls over there after 6 days of hard hunting and not seeing a bison. When I found the bull, I told Corky where they were. Corky was able to catch up to this bull and take him with a PSE Quantum bow. That bison still is the current world’s record and was originally scored by Boone & Crockett at 132, but after the drying period, the bull scored 129-6/8. That was a major hunt for me personally too, because that’s where I accepted Jesus Christ as my Savior. Bison hunting and the Kaibab Plateau always have been special for me, as is the connection that I have with George, Corky and Cindy Richardson, and their family.

The Kaibab Plateau is a huge wilderness area, and there’s not a lot of buffalo there. So, at different times on that hunt, we’d have six or eight people in camp all trying to find a bison for Corky to hunt. Each hunter would go a different direction every day looking at various places, trying to find the bison. Usually when someone draws a bison tag, several of his buddies will help him, because this hunt is a big deal. Most of the time when anyone we know draws a bison tag, the whole community of bowhunters work to try to help him fill that tag. If you draw a buffalo tag, you don’t want to be the only person standing over that dead bull with only a pocket knife in your hand to skin him out, cape him, quarter him and carry-out all that meat. You need your friends there. On the day that Corky went up to this water tank to look for the buffalo I’d found for him, I had left camp and had driven about 150-miles toward home when I got a call on my cell phone. Corky said, “Get back to camp. We’ve got to take pictures.” I knew what had happened when I heard the message. I turned my vehicle around, headed back to camp and helped cut up the big bison and get it out of the woods.

Two years later in 2004, I got one of the Governor’s tags to take a buffalo. I spent the first day walking and hunting, and I didn’t see any buffaloes until the end of the day. I made several stalks, but spooked the buffaloes. The place we were hunting was made up of sage brush flats and deep canyons that led into the Grand Canyon. So, sometimes you’d see the buffalo, but you couldn’t make a stalk, since they’d see or hear you.

Finally, we found a group of buffalo I wanted to go after, but they were on a little peninsula where I couldn’t approach them. The weather was so hot. I lay there in the sun and baked all day long. Although the hunt started the first of September, the temperature was at 95 degrees. The herd I was watching had about 150 buffaloes in it, which made my getting close to any one animal extremely difficult. The buffalo finally started moving, I started moving too, and the herd either saw or smelled me and took off. They kept going and going and going. I started running and walking as fast as I could, wishing that the buffalo would go to a water tank about 2-miles away. When I finally got to a place just above the water tank, I saw the bull that I eventually took at the tank. The wind was really whipping around, but finally the bull came toward us and presented a shot at 25 yards. When I released the arrow from my PSE Mach 6 bow, it pushed the arrow into the buffalo just in front of his right hip. The arrow exited about 20-inches behind the front-left shoulder. After the buffalo took the arrow, he started walking off with the other buffalo. However, he slowed down, and the other buffalo walked away from him. He stopped, lay down and tipped over. He only traveled 400 yards after taking my arrow.

I couldn’t believe I’d taken my bison on the second day of my buffalo hunt in this remote area. There’s one house owned by the Game & Fish Department with a game manager who manages the House Rock Wildlife Management Area. From that house, you have to travel 21-miles down a dirt road to reach a paved road, then you have to drive 15 miles on that highway before you come to another house. To get diesel fuel, you have to drive 100 miles. I’d created a huge camp that would support about 6 people – all folks who would help me find a bull. I had brought my two daughters and my wife on this hunt. That was the only hunt where my wife had gone on with me and stayed during the entire hunt. There were four others besides my family on the hunt with me when I took my buffalo.

You never know how a hunt will go. Sometimes the very best chance you get to take the animal that you’ve come to hunt will be on day one. That happened to me on a sheep hunt when I didn’t connect. I was so focused on hunting and being prepared for a big backpack hunt in Alaska in rough terrain that I wasn’t ready for the hunt when the shot presented itself. I didn’t draw when I should have drawn. The reason I didn’t take the shot was because I wasn’t really prepared mentally to take a shot that early in the morning. I’d spent so much time preparing for the physical demands of the hunt that I didn’t get mentally prepared to take the shot the first day of the hunt. The reason it’s called a hunt is because you never know when you’re going to have an opportunity to take the game you’ve come after. Sometimes that opportunity happens on the first day of the hunt, sometimes in the middle of the hunt and other times at the end of the hunt. You have to be prepared every day you leave camp to draw and shoot. So, I was really surprised that I was ready to take this buffalo on the second day of the hunt. The bull scored 115-6/8, and at the time I took him, he scored No. 7 in the world. Luck was with me on this hunt. When the bull tipped over, he was right on the edge of a road, so I could drive my truck right to him. We really were lucky to be able to skin and quarter that buffalo and load him into the truck without having to carry him a long way. The year that I took my buffalo, there were two Governor’s tags, about six other bull tags and probably 15 or 20 cow and yearling tags. Now there are about 14 any-buffalo tags, and in the fall the state conducts some hunts for cows and yearlings.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Phillip Dalrymple’s 52-Inch Caribou

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Phillip Dalrymple Loves to Elk Hunt


Phillip Dalrymple

Phillip Dalrymple

Editor’s Note: Phillip Dalrymple of Tucson, Arizona, and his family had a history with Jennings bows. For Dalrymple to break from the tradition of shooting Jennings bows and start shooting PSE bows back in 1983 was almost a major family problem. But since the switch, he’s never looked back – and today is one of the nation’s top bowhunters.

I don’t believe there’s anything more fun than to get out in the woods in the mountains and chasing elk when they’re bugling. So far I’ve taken four Pope &Young bulls in Arizona, after having been issued five tags. In Arizona, we have to wait 4 or 5 years after we take one elk before we can take a second one. My best bull net-scored a little under 340 inches, but some of his top-antlers – his G5 and G4 – were broken off on each side of his rack. If he hadn’t had those broken tines, he would have been a 375- to 380-class bull. The first three points on both sides of his rack were 22-, 20- and 21-inches long. I took that bull on the 13th day of a 14-day elk hunt. On that hunt, I saw a lot of big bulls, because the area I was drawn to hunt was notorious for having really big bulls and a lot of elk. Due to these two factors, you’d see a lot of broken antlers in this area.

I first saw this bull early in the season, before he’d broken the points off his rack. However, he fought so much during the season that he’d broken off his antlers by the time I took him. That was one of the problems I had to deal with, because I’d got gotten in close enough to take several big bulls. But they had broken antlers also. I decided to take this particular bull, since he had so much antler on the front end of his rack that I just couldn’t pass him up.

I took the bull with the PSE Vengeance bow using Carbon Force arrows. We had caught up to this bull three different times during the course of the hunt. The first time I got close to him, he was in some Jack pines, and the foliage was so thick I couldn’t get a shot off. When we caught up to him again, the wind changed direction, he smelled us, and the hunt was over. The third time we found him, he was near a water tank, and by then just about all the other hunters had gone home. I set up in a tree stand near a catch drain – drainages where Arizona Game & Fish have built small dams to hold water for elk and other wildlife to drink. The bull came in, and I got to watch him rut for about 1-1/2 hours. He came in right below my stand, bugled and then went running up a hill. He fought another bull and won, brought his cows back down to the water and left the water tank two or three different times, fight and then would return. Two or three times I tried to come to full-draw, but before I could get to full-draw, he moved in a different direction. That bull would come to within 30 yards and then move out to 100 yards. I didn’t think I’d ever get him to stay within shooting range. Our hide and seek went on for about 1-1/2 hours.

Finally, as dark was approaching, he came in and took a drink of water, but he was facing me. It seemed like he drank forever. When he finally finished drinking he stood up and gave me a 27-yard broadside shot. When he took the arrow, he spun around, but then he just stood there. I could see the blood hitting the ground, so I quickly nocked a second arrow and shot him again. The second arrow landed within 2 inches of where the first arrow had hit. One arrow went in one lung, and the second arrow went in the other lung. After taking the second shaft, he walked about 30 yards and went down. This elk was a giant, even if his antlers were broken.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Phillip Dalrymple’s Hunt for the Bison

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Why Bowhunter Phillip Dalrymple Made the Switch to PSE Almost 30 Years Ago


Phillip Dalrymple

Phillip Dalrymple

Editor’s Note: Phillip Dalrymple of Tucson, Arizona, and his family had a history with Jennings bows. For Dalrymple to break from the tradition of shooting Jennings bows and start shooting PSE bows back in 1983 was almost a major family problem. But since the switch, he’s never looked back – and today is one of the nation’s top bowhunters.

I grew-up shooting Jennings Bows, because my Dad had a good friend who was one of the first three employees of Tom Jennings. Due to the family friendship, I’d always shot Jennings bows. I was a tournament archery shooter in the Bowhunter Class and had shot some National Field Archery Association tournaments. But in 1983 when PSE introduced the Vector, one of the first cam bows on the market, I changed to PSE. The Vector was 15- to 20-percent faster than the equivalent bows made by other bow manufacturers. At the time, I was shooting fingers competitively in the Bowhunter Class. The advantage I got from the Vector was a tremendous improvement on the pin gap (judging distance between two sight pins). Having a tighter pin gap was a huge improvement, especially when you were shooting a 100 round. You might have a target at 41 yards, and the next target might be at 48 yards. When I decided to change to PSE from Jennings, my Dad asked, “Why are you changing?” I told him it was strictly due to the performance of the bow, since the PSE bow shot better, especially in competition, than my Jennings bow did.

I don’t compete now as much as I once did. I still shoot in local 3D tournaments, but after 2002, I gave-up shooting field archery, because of family obligations. Too, I wanted to be more active as a hunter. Right now I’m shooting the PSE X-Force bow, and I also have a PSE X-Force Axe that I shoot some tournaments with and use for hunting.

Although I’m a CPA by profession, I still find time to make two or three major hunts a year. I also enjoy hunting around home for deer, javelina and turkey. My dad, Thomas Dalrymple, founded the “Bowhunting in Arizona Record Book” in 1975, and it’s patterned after the “Pope & Young Club Bowhunting Big Game Records of North America” book. It also has some different awards to recognize a well-rounded hunter who’s willing to pursue more than one species of game. Corky Richardson is a PSE shooter and a good friend of mind. He and I started working on the Cochise Award, which required a bowhunter to take seven of the 12 big-game species in Arizona that could be hunted with a bow. We achieved that goal in 1989. Then another award was added to the record-book program called the Kaibab Award. To receive this award, you had to harvest 11 of the now 14 big-game animals in Arizona, which included two kinds of sheep. All the animals had to make the Arizona Record Book to obtain this award. I was the second person in the State of Arizona to earn the Kaibab Award, because I took cougar, bear, turkey, antelope, elk, Coues deer, mule deer, bison, javelina, coyotes, foxes and also a bobcat which, is considered non-measurable species.

The only big-game species I haven’t taken is the Rocky Mountain big horn sheep and the desert big horn sheep, because I haven’t drawn either tag yet. In some of the units with sheep tags, your odds of drawing a tag may be as good as 50 to 1. In other areas that are more popular, your odds may be 600 to 1 for drawing a tag. Bill Hardy, whose son, Tracy Hardy is a PSE shooter and a good friend of mine, has applied every year that Arizona has given sheep tags, starting sometime in the 1950s. Bill is 72-years old right now, and he’s never been drawn.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Phillip Dalrymple Loves to Elk Hunt

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 15,041 other followers