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Mike Deschamps Takes a Lioness with His PSE Mach 12 Bow


Mike Deschamps with Lioness

Mike Deschamps with Lioness

Editor’s Note: Mike Deschamps from Brooktondale, New York, has been on the PSE Pro Staff since Pete Shepley first started the company.

On this lion hunt, I was the most nervous I’d ever been in my hunting career. The lioness we hunted in Botswana, Africa, was a nuisance lioness that had been killing livestock. I’d gotten a call from a friend of mine who told me about this lioness and asked if I’d like to come hunt her with my bow. I said that I would, and within 2 weeks, I was in Botswana. My guide had told me before we started hunting this big lioness, that she would more than likely charge us three or four times before she actually came in, but, on the fourth time, she wouldn’t be bluffing. She would be coming after us. When we were on the trail of the lioness, I had to stop my trackers. I’d hunted my entire life and believed I was a pretty good woodsman. And, I’d look at the ground where these trackers had said the lioness had walked, and I couldn’t see any tracks, scat or disturbed earth to indicate that an animal had been there. But, my professional tracker told me, “These trackers are actually seeing broken pieces of grass. These people have been tracking animals all their lives.” So, as our trackers lead us to this big lioness, we were actually able to spot her five times. But, the lioness never charged us.

On the second day of the hunt, we were headed back toward camp just before dark, and my PH (professional hunter) slammed on the brakes of the Land Rover and said, “There she is, there she is, there she is!” I didn’t see anything when we bailed out of the Land Rover, but I grabbed my bow. The PH pointed out the lioness inside a small thicket. “When a lion’s in a thicket, the animal doesn’t think you can see it.” But the place the lioness was hiding was extremely thick, and I told him I didn’t feel comfortable taking the shot. The PH turned to me and said, “We have to shoot the lioness right now. I’ve seen you shoot targets, and I know you can take this shot. We have to put this lioness down now.” I only had about an 8 inch opening to shoot through to be able to hit the vitals. The lioness was 32 yards away when I drew my Mach 12 and released the arrow. The arrow struck the lioness, and she jumped at least 4 or 5 feet straight up in the air and took off running. We immediately ran after her. She only went about 80 yards and then stopped; so, I moved in about 30 yards from her. She walked about 10 feet and stopped again. By this time, I had drawn my third arrow, and the third arrow hit home. The lioness went down.

We measured the lioness from her nose to the tip of her tail, and she was a huge 9 feet long. The camp had a set of scales that would measure 500 pounds. But when we put her on the scales, her head and shoulders remained on the ground, and the scales still topped out at 500 pounds. We knew she weighed more than 500 pounds. This lioness scored in the top 5 lions in the SCI record book.

As I’ve said before, when you hunt dangerous game, you must have a weapon to depend on, and for more than 30 years I’ve been depending on my PSE bows. This year I’ll be shooting a PSE EVO 7, and I’m really looking forward to getting the newest and the fastest bow PSE has for the bowhunter.

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Mike Deschamps Tells about His Unique Hunt for an Arctic Wolf


Mike Deschamps with Wolf

Mike Deschamps with Wolf

Editor’s Note: Mike Deschamps from Brooktondale, New York, has been on the PSE Pro Staff since Pete Shepley first started the company.

Two days after I took my grizzly bear, several members of an Indian Inuit tribe came and knocked on my door at the camp and explained that they’d seen three wolves out on the ice and wanted to see if I wanted to take one of the wolves. The Inuits hunt, trap and sell fur to earn their livings, as they always have. They know the ways of the critters that live up there where they hunt better than anyone. So, when I told them I wanted to hunt the wolf, they put me on a snowmobile. We headed to a canyon that had a river at the bottom of it before emptying into the ocean. They told me, “Stay right here, because this is where the wolf will show up,” and then they left. I had a makeshift blind that I sat in, and within an hour, I heard two shots. As I looked at the canyon, 700 or 800 yards away, I could see a wolf running, closing ground toward me. Then in nothing flat, the wolf was within 100 yards. “Man, I better get ready,” I told myself.

The wolf kept coming exactly the way the Inuit people had said he would come, before finally stopping out at 30 yards and looking back in the direction from where the two shots had come. I drew my bow and shot at his chest, and the arrow went all the way through him. Once again, the PSE Mach 12 proved its reliability, and the big wolf went down. This hunt was only 2 days after I’d taken my grizzly bear with the PSE Mach 12. This wolf was the number 5 all time wolf ever taken and entered in SCI (Safari Club International). He was a beautiful dark black and gray color, and I have him mounted with my grizzly bear. This Arctic wolf was a great trophy. I only have to take six more animals to have taken the Super Slam of archery.

Tomorrow: Mike Deschamps Takes the Lioness That had to Go with His PSE Mach 12 Bow

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Mike Deschamps on the Grizzly Bear That Charged Him


Mike Deschamps with Gizzly Bear

Mike Deschamps with Gizzly Bear

Editor’s Note: Mike Deschamps from Brooktondale, New York, has been on the PSE Pro Staff since Pete Shepley first started the company.

On another hunt with my PSE bow, I was hunting in the Northwest Territories of Canada with my PSE Mach 12. I flew into Bathurst Inlet, which was an early fur trading center back in the 1800s. From there, I got into a freighter sled towed by a snowmobile, and on the fourth day of the hunt, we found a grizzly bear. I stalked in to the bear, but the closer I got, the more the bear began to shrink, and I decided that this grizzly wasn’t the bear I wanted to take. So, I passed on that bear. Five days later on the ninth day of my 12 day hunt, we spotted another bear. When we saw this bear, there was no question in my mind that this was a shooter grizzly. This bear was hunting as well, digging up the earth, trying to find and eat ground squirrels. This bear had claws longer than my fingers. I stalked up to 36 yards from this bear, but I had no type of cover, because there were no trees. When I came up to draw my bow, the bear spotted me. These bears rarely, if ever, saw a human. Once the bear saw me, he assumed that I was a bigger something to eat than the ground squirrels. He started coming toward me at a brisk pace, seeing me on his menu. I think I took my face off the string before I released the arrow, because the arrow entered just in front of his right hindquarter and penetrated through the back of his right hindquarter. Once the arrow hit the bear, he instantly spun around two times and then bit the arrow off and ran away from me. The bear then stopped. My guide, who had a range finder, ranged the bear at 70 yards. Because I practiced out to 100 yards, I had a 70 yard pin on my sight. I aimed and released the arrow. The second arrow hit the bear right behind the front shoulder. I quickly nocked a third arrow, the guide ranged the bear at 73 yards, and my third arrow hit the bear in the right shoulder. This time the arrow put the bear down for good.

Generally I’d never take over a 50 yard shot with my bow, although I do practice shooting out to 70 and 100 yards  just in case I need a second arrow or even a third arrow to put a wounded animal down quickly and efficiently. This big grizzly was a world record brown grizzly bear taken with a bow. At the time I took him, he was the number two brown grizzly bear ever taken with any weapon. Standing on his hind legs, he measured more than 10 feet tall.

Tomorrow: Mike Deschamps Tells about His Unique Hunt for an Arctic Wolf

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Mike Deschamps Says He’ll Never Go on a Polar Bear Bowhunt Again


Mike Deschamps with Polar Bear

Mike Deschamps with Polar Bear

Editor’s Note: Mike Deschamps from Brooktondale, New York, has been on the PSE Pro Staff since Pete Shepley first started the company.

For this polar bear hunt, I used a PSE Mach 10 bow and a Thunderhead 125 grain broadhead. But, before I went on that hunt, I took this bow completely apart, removed all the lubrication and replaced the lubrication with dry graphite. I knew that in extremely cold weather, wet lubricants might create problems with the bow. So, I opted for a dry lubricant. I decided to go on this polar bear hunt when I was in Mexico hunting. One of the hunters on that trip had drawn a polar bear tag. Once our hunt in Mexico ended, this hunter called me and explained that he and his wife were splitting up, and that he couldn’t go on this polar bear hunt. He asked if I’d like to buy the tag and go on the hunt. I purchased the tag from him, flew to Yellowknife, Northwest Territories in Canada and then flew to Camp Felix, which was where I saw the last building I’d see for many days. We left the camp and went out on the ice in freighter dog sleds, because you couldn’t hunt polar bears on snowmobiles. Once we arrived out on the ice, we hunted from dog sleds. I didn’t find my animal until the eighth day of a 12 day hunt. The hunter who had made this same hunt before me actually was out on the ice for 16 days. For $2500, the outfitter would fly supplies out to a hunter who opted to stay for more days than the 12 day hunt. However, on the eighth day of my hunt, we found the tracks of a polar bear and began to follow the tracks.

This hunt was very grueling, with 20 hours of daylight each day, and we spent most of our days in a sled, being constantly pounded by rough terrain, while pulled by a dog team. We were constantly going over uneven ice. My Inuit guide stood behind me on the sled and directed the dog team. When we could see the bear and got close to him, my guide turned the dogs loose from the sled. They charged the bear and bayed him. I was able to walk within 32 yards of the bear and draw, but I had to hold my shot, until the dogs were clear of the bear. Once I was finally able to release the arrow, I hit the bear behind his front shoulder and double lunged him. When the arrow hit the bear, the polar bear turned and ran with the dogs in hot pursuit, but only went 25 yards before he went down. My guides were two young Inuit boys, and for backups, they both had .22 rifles. Shooting a .22 rifle would be about like a bee sting to a polar bear. Because the air temperature was negative 62 degrees below on the day I took the bear, we had to skin the bear quickly, before he froze, and the hide froze to him. We also had to keep the dogs away from the bear while we were skinning him. If the dogs ate the liver of the bear, the dogs would die very quickly.

Once we took the cape and the skull, we wrapped the hide up. Within an hour, the cape was frozen solid. Then, we packed the skin and the skull in a tarp and returned to the village. Four days later, I was picked up by a charter airplane and flown back to Yellowknife. I left the hide and the skull with a taxidermist and petitioned the United States Government, to bring my trophy back into my country.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Mike Deschamps on the Grizzly Bear That Charged Him

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Mike Deschamps – Taking My First Buck with my PSE


Mike Deschamps

Mike Deschamps

Editor’s Note: Mike Deschamps from Brooktondale, New York, has been on the PSE Pro Staff since Pete Shepley first started the company.

I started shooting PSE in the 1980s, because even back then, they were the best bows on the market. Pete Shepley had a vision of making the best bows possible, and he accomplished his goal when he first started PSE. That vision has continued on even until today. When I first met Pete at a show, I was in charge of product development for the Ithaca Gun Company. I’ve been on PSE’s Pro Staff ever since. Even though I work for a gun company, I’m a bowhunter, and today I hunt strictly with a bow. I remember the first deer I ever took with a PSE bow – a PSE Mach 1.5. He was a Pope & Young buck that scored 140. So, that’s how long ago I was shooting PSE bows. This hunt was a really quick one, since I only had about 1 1/2 hours to hunt. I knew there was a good buck in the area where I was hunting. I took my Baker tree stand, one of the first commercial climbing tree stands on the outdoor market to where I’d planned to hunt and climbed the tree. I had to hug the tree and pull the stand up with my feet. Then, I locked the stand into the tree with my heels, stood up and repeated the same motions, until I reached the place where I wanted to place my stand.

The buck came out at 14 yards from my stand. I aimed right behind the shoulder and released the arrow. The arrow penetrated both lungs. The buck took two jumps, stopped, looked back and collapsed. That buck scored 140 P&Y, which was a huge buck for the State of New York back in those days. That buck wouldn’t have been as impressive today, because hunters are beginning to let some bucks walk. Too, some states have hunting restrictions now. So, as the deer grow older, or are allowed to grow older, we’re seeing more and more big deer here in New York. I know of three Boone & Crockett bucks from New York taken this past season.

I like PSE bows so well and continue to shoot their bows, because they not only were the most highly technical bows on the market from the beginning, but I’ve learned over the years, they’re the most reliable bows available. When you’re hunting dangerous game, that’s not the time to find out whether or not your bow’s reliable. This week I’ll be telling you about a polar bear, a grizzly bear, an arctic wolf and an African lioness that had been killing domestic livestock that I’ve taken with my PSE bow. When you’re up close and personal with animals that can hurt you, reliability becomes a major quality that I want in a bow I use for hunting. Throughout my hunting career, my PSE bows have performed flawlessly. I’ve taken a Coues deer in 116 degree plus weather and a polar bear in minus 16 degree weather. I’ve found that regardless of the temperature or the terrain, PSE bows can take the test of the elements and pass with flying colors.

Tomorrow: Mike Deschamps Says He’ll Never Go on a Polar Bear Bowhunt Again

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


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