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A Hunter’s Dream Bow and Buck with PSE’s Marty Henrikson


PSE’s Marty Henrikson

PSE’s Marty Henrikson

Editor’s Note:  Marty Henrikson of Tucson, Arizona, has been shooting PSE bows for 36 years. Henrikson, an avid bowhunter, competed for many years on the 3D archery circuit and also won the Arizona Cup in the compound division.

Question: Marty, why did you start shooting PSE bows?

I started shooting PSE bows as soon as I discovered that recurve bows weren’t very efficient. Even back in those days, like today, PSE had some of the newest technology in bow design. PSE made a bow called the Pacer, and as a graduation gift from high school, I received the PSE Laser Magnum.  I was very successful with the Laser Magnum and hunted with it for several years. The Laser was so dependable; I never saw a reason to change from PSE bows.

Question: Do you strictly bowhunt, or do you also shoot target archery?

For a number of years, I competed on the 3D archery circuit. I was also fortunate enough to compete in the Arizona Cup and won it a few years ago in the compound division. However, since that win, I’ve primarily been a bowhunter.

Question: What’s one of the best animals you’ve taken with your PSE bow?

In 2006, I took the number three Coues deer in the world taken with a bow. The buck scored just over 119 on the P&Y scale. In Arizona, we have a September hunt. At that time of the year, we normally sit over water holes to hunt, because it’s usually hot and dry, and the deer come to water holes. But in 2006, we had had a wet September, and there was plenty of water. So, I decided to go out and stalk. I found a group of deer with five bucks ranging in sizes from a spike up to the nice deer I took. My deer was a 4X4, which is considered a 10 point by eastern count. The herd of bucks was on the move, and I was hoping I could watch them bed down. The deer kept moving, and I finally lost sight of them. Because I knew the direction they were traveling, I decided to go look for them, once they were out of my sight. I was on a rock outcrop by the time I got close to the spot where I’d last seen the bucks. I spotted some movement below me, which was a whole herd of deer. The deer came out directly below me, and I ranged them at 35 to 40 yards.

The first two bucks in the herd were spikes – two nice looking 3 points, which were considered 8 points by eastern count. On any other hunt, I would have been happy to have a chance to take either one of those deer. Each of those bucks was in the 90 to 100 point range on Pope & Young, but I had seen that big buck and wanted to wait for him. Finally, my big buck showed up in the back of the herd. When my buck stepped behind a cedar tree, I drew my bow and waited. I had to hold my bow for a long time, waiting for him to step out from behind the tree. When he finally came out and presented a clean shot, he was at such a severe angle to me that I had to put my 30 yard pin about 2 inches above the bottom of his chest. The arrow entered the deer about 78 inches above where I was holding my 30 yard pin and went out the other side of the deer, taking out both lungs. He ran about 50 yards and stopped, and I got to see him fall over. Because I was hunting by myself, I had to field dress, pack the deer and put him in a freighter pack. I took that deer with a PSE AR 34.

I knew how to aim because of my years in tournament archery, and especially from being at the Redding Shoot in Redding, California. That entire tournament required the archer to estimate range from the tops to the bottoms of the hills, and all the distances in between.  It was at that tournament that I really learned how to shoot accurately from a severe angle above the target. Too, if you live in Arizona, rarely will you ever shoot an animal on level ground.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Marty Henrikson Takes a 170 Class Bow Buck

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