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Five More Secrets to Scouting for Deer Before the Season with PSE’s Mark Drury


PSE’s Mark Drury

Editor’s Note: Mark Drury of Saint Peters, Missouri, the founder of M.A.D. Calls, co-owner of Drury Outdoor Productions with his brother Terry and a long-time avid bowhunter also is a member of PSE’s Pro Hunt team. This season Mark will be shooting the new PSE Dream Season EVO.

Secret No. 6: You’ve got to have good glass to scout for bucks. I want to stay at least 400-yards away from the fields that I’m scouting. For this reason, I’ll usually use 10X binoculars when I’m scouting and/or use a spotting scope. Eastern hunters don’t take advantage of spotting scopes nearly as much as western hunters do, and you’ll rarely see an eastern hunter scout with a spotting scope or 10X binoculars. However, remember, the further you stay away from the deer, the less human odor you’ll introduce to your hunting site, and the better your odds are for taking an older-age-class buck. Too, by using quality binoculars and spotting scopes, you can spend more time scouting from your truck, which keeps your human odor in your vehicle. I use a window-mount device for my spotting scope to mount the scope on the window.

Secret No. 7: I’ll begin to move tree stands or set-up new tree stands, as I learn more about the deer from my scouting program. I hang many tree stands on the farm I hunt during January and February, after deer season. Then, during July and August, I go check these tree stands to make sure they’re still safe and secure. I hang new tree stands, so that I will have stands in the location where the deer will be traveling in the beginning of bow season. The two factors that determine the day I will hang a tree stand are weather conditions and time of day. In the summer months, I try to hang my tree stand in the middle of the day when the weather is hottest, and when I’m almost certain rain will come in the afternoon. Because hot weather helps evaporate human odor, and a rain washes it away, I know that my human odor won’t linger long, and the rain will wash away what human odor I do leave. I wear long pants and long-sleeved shirts made of breathable material when I’m going through the woods. I want all of the stands I’m going to hunt from during the upcoming deer season to be in place by the middle of August or the first of September. This way when I start bowhunting in October and November, I’ll have fresh stands to hunt from that don’t have any human odor associated with them.

Secret No. 8: My brother Terry and I have several farms we hunt. Before the season comes in, we try to have 80- to 100-tree stands in place and ready to hunt from on these farms. With that many stand sites, there’s no way we can remember or find all of them. We plot out every tree-stand site with GPS. We log each stand site into the GPS and give each one a name. We also record all of our stand site names, location and every wind direction that the stand can be hunted from on paper. By using this method, we can turn on our computer in the morning and go to www.weather.com to learn what wind direction we will have that day in our area. Then we check our list of stand sites and see which stands we can hunt with a favorable wind. Once we have decided the stand sites we can hunt from, we pick-out the stand where we believe our chances are best for taking a buck that day. Then, we pull that stand site up in our hand-held GPS, go straight to it in the dark, get into the tree and are ready to hunt before daylight.

Secret No. 9: I begin to pick the bucks I want to hunt from the motion-sensor-camera information and from observing the deer in the field. The bucks I’ll try to hunt aren’t always going to be the biggest bucks I see. The secret is determining from the bucks you have identified which bucks appear on the trails the most often during daylight hours. Some bucks have a tendency not to move until after dark. If you attempt to hunt these bucks, you can hunt several days and not see those bucks during daylight hours. However, if you hunt for the bucks that have a tendency to move-down trails and be in the green fields during daylight hours, you drastically increase your odds for taking a buck during the first week of bow season. Once I identify these bucks, I may move some of the cameras and my tree stand to learn all I can about these individual bucks I’ve decided to hunt. Knowing which bucks move during daylight hours gives me a tremendous advantage when hunting season opens. I can learn which bucks move the most during daylight hours by scouting during the summer using binoculars, spotting scopes and motion-sensor cameras without spending much time in the woods and alerting or spooking the deer.

Secret No. 10: I want to find the best spot to take the buck I want to hunt and know where he is living and moving during bow season. If I try to take him over the green field or the agricultural crop, I may spook him and the other deer that are coming to that food source. I’ve learned from my motion-sensor cameras that most bucks will move to water before they’ll go to feed. My brother Terry and I have learned that often the most-productive place to have a tree stand site for older-age-class bucks in the early season is along the trail that the bucks use when they’re going to water.

To learn more about Mark and Terry Drury and Drury Outdoors, visit http://www.druryoutdoors.com/.

For more bowhunting tips, check-out “Bowhunting Deer: The Secrets of the PSE Pros,” a new eBook for Amazon Kindle by John E. Phillips. You also can go to http://www.amazon.com/kindle-ebooks and type-in the name of the book to find it. Too, you can download a free Kindle app that enables you to read the book on your iPad, computer or SmartPhone.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Five Secrets to Scouting for Deer Before the Season with PSE’s Mark Drury


Mark Drury

PSE’s Mark Drury

Editor’s Note: Mark Drury of Saint Peters, Missouri, the founder of M.A.D. Calls, co-owner of Drury Outdoor Productions with his brother Terry and a long-time avid bowhunter also is a member of PSE’s Pro Hunt team. This season Mark will be shooting the new PSE Dream Season EVO.

Secret No. 1: I plant green fields with Mossy Oak’s BioLogic in areas where I have easy access with my truck to study the green fields, but I don’t plan to hunt them. I plant long narrow strips that are invisible from a public road but very visible from a woods road. During the summer months, the wind direction in our section of the country often is a south wind. I want these long fields to be where I can either walk-in or drive-in and scout these fields with a south wind, so the deer won’t be able to smell me. I plant two different types of green fields. One is what I call an observation field, which allows me to see the deer on the property during the summer months that I have to hunt. The other field is what I call my hidey-holes. I plan to actually take the bucks from these green fields that are planted in or near thick cover. The way you plant your green fields determines whether you’ll be able to scout successfully for deer season or not.

Secret No. 2: I start hunting a buck in July when the buck’s antlers are just beginning to develop. One of the secrets to consistently taking bucks is knowing which green fields bucks are coming to, and which green fields does prefer. I plant BioLogic in the spring, so I’ll have summer green fields where the deer can feed. I go to these fields in July to identify the trails the deer are using to come into those green fields and put RECONYX motion-sensor cameras along these trails to get pictures of the bucks coming to the green fields. Then I know which green fields each buck is utilizing. Trail-monitoring cameras enable a hunter to find big bucks, and to know where they’re moving quickly and easily and what time of the day or night they’re moving and how big the deer are. Even when I’m scouting, I wear camouflage.

Secret No. 3: Deer change their nutritional needs from green fields to soybean fields, as the summer progresses in Missouri, my home state. One of the keys to scouting is noticing when the deer switch their feeding patterns and then moving your motion-sensor cameras to new trails to keep-up with deer movement. When the Missouri deer leave my green fields and go to soybean fields in August, I change my cameras from the green fields and put them on trails leading to soybean fields and other agricultural crops to learn which bucks are going to these fields. For trail cameras to be effective, you have to move the cameras as the deer change food sources. If you do, you can keep-up with the location of the bucks on the property and watch these bucks’ antlers grow and develop. Another advantage to using the trail cameras is that you disturb the area where you plan to hunt very little. All I have to do to scout efficiently is go to the trail camera and change-out the film, which means I have little human impact on the deer.

Secret No. 4: You must know when to go to the cameras. During the summer months, as I’ve said earlier, the deer will move very little. I’ve learned I usually won’t get more than four or five pictures of deer per day on a good trail during July and August. So, I don’t spend nearly as much time in my hunting area getting the pictures. Another big advantage this method of scouting gives me is that I’m scouting every day from 10- or 20-different locations and not leaving any human scent in those regions. I’m not pressuring the deer that I plan to hunt in the fall during the summer months. In addition to wearing camouflage clothing, I usually wear a head net and gloves when visiting my cameras. I want to get to the cameras as quickly and as quietly as possible, leave as little human odor I can and be invisible to the deer.

Secret No. 5: I like to actually see the deer, especially the bucks I’ll be hunting in the fall, besides using the trail-timer camera. But once again, I want to see the buck from a distance and not disturb him by getting too close. I’ve learned from my motion-sensor cameras that the first 10 days of a full moon is when I’ll see the most big bucks coming to a green field late in the afternoon. I’ll take advantage of the deer’s reaction to the phases of the moon during the summer months, just as much as I do during the fall and winter months. I want to see the bucks on the green field to try and determine their personalities and their temperaments. Some bucks will be very bold, while other bucks will be very skittish. Some bucks will walk right out in the middle of a green field, while other bucks will hold on the edge. By being able to study the bucks through binoculars or spotting scopes from a long distance, I can learn the personality of each buck. If you’re going to go to a green field and study the bucks, you’ll want to go to that field when the most bucks will be on it. I’ve learned that not only most of the bucks, but more importantly most of the big bucks that are using a green field will be out in that green field early in the afternoon for 10 days after a full moon.

To learn more about Mark and Terry Drury and Drury Outdoors, visit http://www.druryoutdoors.com/.

For more bowhunting tips, check-out “Bowhunting Deer: The Secrets of the PSE Pros,” a new eBook for Amazon Kindle by John E. Phillips. You also can go to http://www.amazon.com/kindle-ebooks and type-in the name of the book to find it. Too, you can download a free Kindle app that enables you to read the book on your iPad, computer or SmartPhone.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


2012 Dream Season EVO Bow Give Away!


Go to Facebook at www.facebook.com/OfficialPSEArchery and CLICK on the enter to win tab! Sweepstakes ends August 31st, 2012. Good luck! Sweepstakes rules apply. See the app page for more details at http://bit.ly/NmqjHf.

Come and visit us at www.pse-archery.com


Bow Madness premieres PrimeTime tonight at 9pm CST on Outdoor Channel!


Bow Madness premieres PrimeTime tonight at 9pm CST on Outdoor Channel

Bow Madness premieres PrimeTime tonight at 9pm CST on Outdoor Channel!

With mean PSE rigs, guts and every ounce of skill they have, the Drury Outdoors Team makes a mad dash across the continent to put a Rage in the cage and a buck in the back of the truck. These episodes hit hard and fast as the arrows we sling, and you get to sling some too. One of our fans’ hunts per week will air during the I Shot It With My PSE segment. At the end of the season, all of America will vote on their favorite, and the winner takes home a new Dream Season Edition HuntVe 4×4 electric UTV. It’s archery-only, adrenaline-always. With some of the best bowhunters on the planet.

Outdoor Channel Monday 5 p.m. CST, Wednesday 12:30 a.m. CST, Thursday 9 p.m. CST

 


Tracy Drury talks about the bond between Mark and his daughter Taylor


Mark and Taylor Drury are a father and daughter team from Drury Outdoors. Tracy Drury is Mark’s wife and Taylor’s mother. Tracy talks about the bond between Mark and his daughter Taylor.


No Matter What Taylor Drury’s Future Holds, She’ll Still Be Outdoors


Taylor & Mark Drury - Drury Outdoors

Taylor & Mark Drury - Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note: Taylor Drury is the 16 year old daughter of Mark Drury of Drury Outdoors and the creator of M.A.D. Calls. Taylor can’t remember when she first started shooting a bow, but the family likes to joke that she was born with a bow in her hand. Taylor explains that, “I really like watching animals and enjoy shooting my bow and taking deer. Most of all, I enjoy the quality time I spend with my dad in the outdoors when we scout, put out cameras, plant green fields, and hunt together.” This week, we’ll learn more about Taylor, what hunting means to her, and why hunting is such a strong thread that’s woven through the fabric of the Drury family.

Taylor Drury: I’m often asked, “Taylor, what are you going to do when you grow up?” I guess that’s a question older people always ask teenagers, but honestly, I really don’t know. I do know that I’d like to work with my dad and my family in Drury Outdoors. Drury Outdoors is a family business, and I would really like to help carry on the family tradition that my dad and my uncle have created. I think a lot of how much I’ll be involved in the family business depends on where my dad is at in his life when I get out of college. I do have another interest though, because ever since I was a little kid, I’ve had an interest in going to medical school. If my career turns out to be something other than hunting and being in the outdoors, I know I will continue hunting and helping my dad as a hobby. I believe I’ll always hunt with my bow and want to be with my dad. However, I’m not really ready to make any plans as to what my career will be, until I get to the appropriate time to make a decision.

I think being in the woods and seeing a wide variety of animals is so much fun, and especially animals you don’t normally see in the city. If you don’t live on a farm, then you’ll rarely see a deer. But I think sitting in a blind or tree stand and seeing how deer react to different changes in the environment is cool. To be completely honest, the thing I love most about bowhunting and hunting in general is the time I get to spend with my dad. My dad is gone a lot because of work, but he’s doing what he loves to do. Unfortunately, he has to be away from our family quite a bit. Normally when he’s home, Dad and I hunt together. Hunting provides such a great time for fathers and daughters to bond. We’ve always had an interest in hunting together, and my dad has always found a way to make hunting fun for me. Usually, the most one on one time dad and I have together is when we hunt. Often my dad will be at the farm, and I’ll be at home going to school. So, when we do have time together in the outdoors, our adventures aren’t only about hunting, but also about our being together.

One of the great things about hunting with my dad is that when we go hunting, he’s always in a good mood. Dad isn’t into shopping, and he doesn’t really enjoy going out to eat either. My dad is an outdoorsman. The outdoors is where he works, and where he’s the happiest. When we’re hunting, my dad’s really happy, and it’s the time when we have the most fun together. So, to go back to the original question of how to get kids interested in hunting, why I’ve become a bowhunter and will I stay in hunting, the simple answer is that hunting gives me an opportunity to have fun with my dad, and for me, there’s nothing more important than that.

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Taylor Drury Talks about Her School, Friends and Bowhunting


Taylor Drury - Drury Outdoors

Taylor Drury - Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note: Taylor Drury is the 16 year old daughter of Mark Drury of Drury Outdoors and the creator of M.A.D. Calls. Taylor can’t remember when she first started shooting a bow, but the family likes to joke that she was born with a bow in her hand. Taylor explains that, “I really like watching animals and enjoy shooting my bow and taking deer. Most of all, I enjoy the quality time I spend with my dad in the outdoors when we scout, put out cameras, plant green fields, and hunt together.” This week, we’ll learn more about Taylor, what hunting means to her, and why hunting is such a strong thread that’s woven through the fabric of the Drury family.

Taylor Drury: Yesterday, I spoke about how my boyfriend and my dad spent two afternoons together in a tree stand. Sometimes people ask me if I’m going to teach Zac how to shoot a bow, but honestly, I don’t know. I think Zac may want to continue learning about hunting from behind a camera, before he tries to master a bow. He can learn much more about how and why we hunt from behind a camera than he can while shooting a bow. From behind the camera, he can better understand the effort and reasoning in planting green fields, scouting, putting out trail cameras, studying pictures and trying to determine which bucks we should or shouldn’t take in the coming season. And, after that, if he wants to learn to shoot a bow, we can start teaching him.

I know how to shoot a bow, and I feel like I can shoot a bow with a lot of confidence. I may be able to teach Zac, but if he wants to learn to shoot a bow, I’d prefer for my dad to teach him. My dad’s the best bowhunting instructor I’ve ever known. My dad is patient and knows exactly what and how to teach. I think my boyfriend will learn far more from my dad than he will from me. I’m not sure I have the patience to be a good teacher, but I know my dad has that patience. Zac has told me that after being in a tree stand with my dad, at some point he may like to harvest a deer.

Many of my friends don’t even know that I’m a bowhunter, or that I’m on television and in videos. We live in the city, where there seems to be two types of people, either hunters or PETA advocates. I don’t share with a lot of people at school that I hunt and am on television and in videos. A few boys at my school who have grown up hunting and watching our TV shows think I’m cool, because I know how to shoot a bow and take a deer. The guys interested in hunting are really interested in talking to me about how I hunt, and what I do on hunts. Most of my friends think it’s really cool that I’m an outdoors person and a bowhunter and get to hunt with my dad, especially since not many girls at my school hunt. But the subject of my hunting doesn’t come up much at school.

Tomorrow: No Matter What Taylor Drury’s Future Holds, She’ll Still Be Outdoors

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Bowhunting – The Way that Taylor Drury’s Dad, Mark Drury, and Boyfriend Got to Know Each Other


Taylor Drury & Zac

Taylor Drury & Zac

Editor’s Note: Taylor Drury is the 16 year old daughter of Mark Drury of Drury Outdoors and the creator of M.A.D. Calls. Taylor can’t remember when she first started shooting a bow, but the family likes to joke that she was born with a bow in her hand. Taylor explains that, “I really like watching animals and enjoy shooting my bow and taking deer. Most of all, I enjoy the quality time I spend with my dad in the outdoors when we scout, put out cameras, plant green fields, and hunt together.” This week, we’ll learn more about Taylor, what hunting means to her, and why hunting is such a strong thread that’s woven through the fabric of the Drury family.

Taylor Drury: I have one problem that I think other teenage girls probably have, and that is how to get a dad and a boyfriend to get along. My boyfriend Zac isn’t a hunter, and as everyone knows, my dad certainly is a hunter. My boyfriend doesn’t shoot a bow or a gun, and my dad does both. You can see how I would be worried about whether these two were going to get along or not. I wasn’t sure, but hoped that the fact that they were so different wasn’t going to be a major problem.

I took Zac up to the farm for the first time, so he could experience hunting, which of course is a major part of my life and my family’s life. At the time, I didn’t know it, but my dad wanted to get me on film taking a deer. My dad asked his cameraman, Joe, to film me, and then asked my boyfriend, Zac, if he’d be willing to go with him on a hunt. My dad wanted Zac to film him if he came across an opportunity to take a deer. This meant that my dad and my boyfriend, who didn’t really know each other, would be spending quite a few hours together in a tree. What was worse was that I wouldn’t be there to act as a buffer between them, and that was a scary thought. Before the hunt, my dad took Zac out in the woods, showed him how to run the camera, gave him an opportunity to practice running the camera and attempted to prepare him for what an afternoon in the tree stand would be like. I found out later that after spending two afternoons in the tree stand filming my dad, Zac really enjoyed seeing all the deer and had a great time with my dad. Although Zac didn’t grow up in a hunting family and had had no previous exposure to being out in the woods and around wildlife, he got a good taste of what I’ve always had the privilege to enjoy.

Zac and I had only been dating for about 7 months at that time, and to be honest, having my dad ask my boyfriend to help out felt somewhat awkward. That was the first time that Zac and my dad had spent any time together without my mom or me being present. I was really nervous about how things might turn out. My dad can be a real jokester, and he can come across as very sarcastic, but he’s only kidding. I was wondering to myself, “What if my dad says something very rude, and Zac doesn’t figure out that he’s just joking. Or, what if my dad says something that totally embarrasses me?” While I couldn’t help but worry about what might happen, I could rely on the fact that I knew my dad would introduce Zac to the experience of hunting. This was Zac’s first time in the woods, and I knew my dad would help him, since it was his first time out. I knew dad would explain a lot about hunting to Zac to help him understand what hunting and especially bowhunting involved. I was pretty relieved after the first hunt when Zac told me that he had had a really good time, and that he had learned a lot from my dad. I knew that during their time together, things could have turned out badly between my dad and Zac, but I also realize that whoever I date has to be okay with my parents.

After Zac and my dad spending two afternoon hunts together and getting along well, Zac and I now can make more trips to the farm during hunting season. Too, if I’m hunting and being filmed, now I know that Zac will have a really good time running the camera for dad. From this experience, I’ve learned that my dad’s idea of his taking my boyfriend hunting wasn’t a bad idea. I also think that the relationship Zac and dad have built from two afternoons in a tree stand together have helped each of them get to know each other better, and also makes things better for me.

Tomorrow: Taylor Drury Talks about Her School, Friends and Bowhunting

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


A Dad and a Buck for Taylor Drury to Remember


 Taylor & Mark Drury - Drury Outdoors

Taylor & Mark Drury - Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note: Taylor Drury is the 16 year old daughter of Mark Drury of Drury Outdoors and the creator of M.A.D. Calls. Taylor can’t remember when she first started shooting a bow, but the family likes to joke that she was born with a bow in her hand. Taylor explains that, “I really like watching animals and enjoy shooting my bow and taking deer. Most of all, I enjoy the quality time I spend with my dad in the outdoors when we scout, put out cameras, plant green fields, and hunt together.” This week, we’ll learn more about Taylor, what hunting means to her, and why hunting is such a strong thread that’s woven through the fabric of the Drury family.

Taylor Drury: Last year, I took the best bow buck I’ve ever taken. However, this wasn’t the first time I’d drawn my bow on this deer. We named the buck, Chief Tricks, because every time I’d get a shot, just before I could release the arrow, he’d run away. My dad had taken me to one of the favorite fields we’ve planted and named, Hourglass. Relatively early in the day, there still was plenty of daylight. We saw two other deer, and then we saw Chief Tricks, coming out from the side, 10 yards from my stand. One thing I’ve learned is that settling in to take a shot at a deer is much harder than settling in to take a shot at target archery in the backyard. My nerves immediately go crazy when I see a deer to shoot. My heart starts pumping fast, and when I start to make my draw, I feel like I’m pulling a 100 pound bow. But I’m always able to pull my Chaos to full draw, and I always remember what my dad has taught me about how to follow through after the release. I’ve had so much practice with the Chaos that I have a tremendous amount of confidence in my bow. I’ve learned that with my Chaos, I don’t have to think about my bow. All I have to do is keep my form and go through my shooting sequence, and the bow will do its job. This time when Chief Tricks came in, I made my draw, went through my shooting sequence, released the arrow and knew I had a good hit.

After seeing Chief Tricks stand still for a moment and then run off, we climbed down out of the tree stand and started tracking the buck. We had a good blood trail on Chief Tricks, so I knew I had double lunged him. We found him about 50  or 60 yards away. Seeing that buck with those horns gave me an amazing feeling. I was almost surprised that my Chaos at low poundage could take down this monster buck. Chief Tricks scored 140 on the Pope & Young scale. Every time I take a deer with my bow, when I finally get to that deer, there’s a level of excitement that makes me want to do it all over again to find that same joy.

I also enjoy the effort my dad and I put in together when we prepare green fields, put out cameras, and study the pictures of the wildlife. Before the season opens, we like to watch deer from a blind. And all of our hard work comes together when either of us gets to take a buck with our PSE bows. For me, taking that buck with my Chaos was one of the major accomplishments in my life, especially at 16 years old. I also feel really special to have a dad who invests so much time in teaching me how to shoot accurately. Knowing that my dad has confidence in my ability to shoot, and then finally taking a deer with my bow, is one of my favorite things.

Tomorrow: Bowhunting – The Way That Taylor Drury’s Dad, Mark Drury, and Boyfriend Got to Know Each Other

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Building a Relationship and a Sport for a Lifetime with PSE Bows – Taylor Drury


Taylor Drury - Drury Outdoors

Taylor Drury - Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note: Taylor Drury is the 16 year old daughter of Mark Drury of Drury Outdoors and the creator of M.A.D. Calls. Taylor can’t remember when she first started shooting a bow, but the family likes to joke that she was born with a bow in her hand. Taylor explains that, “I really like watching animals and enjoy shooting my bow and taking deer. Most of all, I enjoy the quality time I spend with my dad in the outdoors when we scout, put out cameras, plant green fields, and hunt together.” This week, we’ll learn more about Taylor, what hunting means to her, and why hunting is such a strong thread that’s woven through the fabric of the Drury family.

Taylor Drury: I’ve been shooting a PSE bow for about 3 years and I really love the PSE Chaos, because it’s comfortable, it fits me really well, and the bow isn’t too heavy to handle with ease. The Chaos is quiet, crazy fast and is easy for me to draw and shoot. My Chaos is so fast that I don’t have to shoot a heavy draw length to be at the legal limit for the arrow to pass all the way through a deer.

The first deer I took with my PSE Chaos was a doe, and since then I’ve taken two bucks. In my opinion, the Chaos is one of the best bows for young archers available on the market today. I’m not a weight lifter, so my arms aren’t overly strong. I shoot at a light weight, but there’s still enough weight to get a total pass through a deer, especially at close ranges. The Chaos is just right for the range I shoot.

I can’t remember when I first started going into the outdoors with my dad. But, I think my first memory is of my dad scouting and carrying me on his back when I was 3  or 4 years old. I guess it was before turkey season started, because Dad would stop, make some turkey calls and listen for turkeys. My dad would let me use his calls to try and call the turkeys. When deer season was about to come in, we’d go out riding in our vehicle at night looking for deer. Dad taught me to use his binoculars and also what to look for when scouting for deer. When I got a little older, my dad would let me go with him, and we’d sit in a blind and look for deer together. Although I was interested in looking at deer when we first started going, pretty soon into our adventure, I’d get disinterested. Dad brought plenty of snacks and portable games for me to play with in the blind, while he was watching for deer. Dad also would bring a blanket to keep me warm and allow me to go to sleep if I wanted. Dad made sure I didn’t get bored and brought along enough items to keep me interested. If I did get bored or tired, I could go to sleep, until the time came to go home.

I’m asked a lot, “What’s the secret to getting a young person to want to go hunting?” I think the first key is to make sure that your daughter or son will enjoy the time you spend together. Don’t have unrealistic expectations of what the child is capable of doing. Most children aren’t going to be able to sit quietly for long periods of time in a blind. Remember that the child will want to do things that are fun for them and will hold their attention. If you’ll give your child the opportunity to try things they can be successful at, then they’ll want to keep trying new things. Many girls want to be with their dads anyway, so if they can be together and have fun, the child will want to go another time as well.

I think one of the big mistakes that dads often make with their children is they make their children go hunting whether they want to or not. Since I’ve grown up in a hunting family, I’ve always been interested in what my family does when they go out in the woods. I’ve always wanted to go with my dad, and I’ve never turned down an opportunity for us to be together. But we haven’t just spent time sitting in the blind. We’ve played games, and he has made hunting fun. For instance, when we’d go out scouting when I was younger, he would say, “Taylor, let’s make a bet on how many deer we’re going to see this afternoon.” When we would look at the pictures taken from the camera, he’d ask me how big I thought the deer were, and that too became a game. Dad really built my interest, not only in hunting, but in everything to do with the wild. Dad created as many games as he could that he and I could play together that related to hunting, archery, wildlife management and nature in general. I think that’s the real secret of starting a young person out hunting. Make it fun for them, have plenty of snacks and always have such a good time that they’ll want to go back out again with you.

Tomorrow: A Dad and a Buck for Taylor Drury to Remember

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


What’s in the Future for PSE’s Mark Drury?


Taylor & Mark Drury - Drury Outdoors

Taylor & Mark Drury - Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note: Why would a daddy teach his daughter to hunt, and what are the benefits? This week, we’ll learn the answers to these questions and more from PSE’s Mark Drury of Drury Outdoors, a nationally known turkey caller and deer and turkey hunter. You’ll be surprised what you’ll learn about why every father should get his daughter into hunting.

Question: Mark, what’s hunting with Taylor like now that she’s a teenager?

Drury: Taylor’s much more fun to hunt with now than when she was a little girl. She really wants to succeed as a bowhunter. Taylor gets so much more excited now than she did when she was little, and she cries with excitement when she takes a deer.

Question: Mark, yesterday you told us about taking Taylor’s boyfriend, Zac, hunting with you. Why would you advise other dads who hunt to take their daughters’ boyfriends hunting with them?

Drury: You never know what you’ll learn. By taking Zac hunting, everything I found out was all good. I’m very pleased with Taylor dating Zac, because I’ve learned he’s a really good man. I feel like Zac and I have begun to bond a little.

Question: What did Taylor ask about when you took Zac hunting?

Drury: She asked me 50 million questions, “What did he say to you? What did you say to him?” But, at the end of the day, I really believe that she felt the experience was good for her, for Zac and for me. After getting to know Zac on the hunt, I’m really proud of this young man she’s decided to date.

Question: Mark, what’s in the future for you and Taylor?

Drury: Hopefully, a lot more hunting together. However, Taylor has college staring her in the face in one year, and I’m worried about how much time we’ll have to hunt together. When girls go to college, other things become more important than hunting with dad. But, I still believe that Taylor will carve out a few weekends for us to hunt together. I believe Taylor and I will always spend time in the outdoors together, but I feel sure that once she starts to college, we’ll have less time than in the past to hunt together.

Question: What do you think about the possibility of Taylor coming into the family business and becoming a bigger part of Drury Outdoors?

Drury: We’ll have to see when that time comes, and when Taylor decides what she wants to do. If that’s what she wants to do, we’ll try to find a place for her in Drury Outdoors. I feel like hunting and especially bowhunting have created a strong bond between us. I don’t think that bond ever will go away as long as we live, and I look forward to many hunting seasons in our future. One thing that has always been 100 percent with Taylor is that when she squeezes a trigger on a mechanical release or on a rifle, she’s dead on. I’ve never seen Taylor miss with a rifle, and she only has missed one deer with her bow and never missed a turkey. She’s an incredible shot.

Question: What are you the most proud of about Taylor as a hunter?

Drury: Her ability to close the deal when she’s got the shot.

Question: Since Taylor was brave enough to bring Zac to meet and hunt with you, if she has other boyfriends, do you think she will be brave enough to bring them to hunt with you too?

Drury: I think she will, because I believe it’s important to Taylor to know what I think about them.

Question: What’s in the future for Drury Outdoors?

Drury: Well, Terry and I aren’t getting any younger. But Terry’s son, Matt, is doing a fantastic job managing the business. So, we’re going to continue to entertain the outdoor public with good DVDs, Internet content and TV shows, and we want to continue to expand our business. We’re finishing up the best year our company ever has had in a tough economy, and we plan to continue to grow the business.

Question: How did you and Terry develop Drury Outdoors as a family business?

Drury: The business just kind of happened. We believe in family, and Terry and I both know that we can always trust our family. Terry and I both believe it’s the best family business there is, but we may be a little partial.

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.

Next week: Hunting from Taylor’s perspective.


PSE’s Mark Drury on Getting to Know His Daughter’s Boyfriend through Hunting


Taylor & Mark Drury - Drury Outdoors

Taylor & Mark Drury - Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note: Why would a daddy teach his daughter to hunt, and what are the benefits? This week, we’ll learn the answers to these questions and more from PSE’s Mark Drury of Drury Outdoors, a nationally known turkey caller and deer and turkey hunter. You’ll be surprised what you’ll learn about why every father should get his daughter into hunting.

Question: Mark, what happened when boys started coming around to see Taylor?
Drury: Taylor is dating a young man named Zac. When Taylor brought Zac to the farm to go hunting for the first time, I told her, “We’re way down in the number of deer we’ve taken on video for Drury Outdoors. We’ve got to take more deer, so I need at least two people hunting and two people videoing. I’ll take a nice buck, and you can take a nice buck. I’ll send you out with Joe Foster, (who has been my cameraman for 3 years), and I’ll take Zac with me. I’ll teach Zac how to run a camera. Zac can sit in a tree and film me hunting. We really need to hunt this way this weekend.” Taylor didn’t act like she minded having her boyfriend hunt with me, and I think she knew that I’d spend enough time with him, so he’d feel comfortable running a camera.

Question: What was spending an afternoon with your daughter’s boyfriend like?
Drury: I had a lot of fun with Zac. At first, he didn’t know the difference between a camera and a rabbit.

Question: What did you learn about Zac when you two were in the tree together?
Drury: I learned that he got very nervous every time we saw a deer. I also learned that he was a good forward thinker, and that he had a good eye for the camera. Zac did really well, and I think he is a sharp young man. But, I need to clear something up. When Zac and I went on our first deer hunt, we didn’t get in a tree stand, we went to a box blind.

Question: What was going on in the blind when you weren’t seeing deer?
Drury: We were both texting Taylor and aggravating her. Zac would text her, “Your dad told me some things I never knew about you.” Then, I would text her and say, “You won’t believe what Zac just said.” Zac and I were both driving Taylor crazy, because we wouldn’t explain what we were texting to her. We aggravated the tar out of her, and she took all the kidding hook, line and sinker.

Question: What did Taylor think when you decided to take him out the second day with you?
Drury: By then, she thought it was all good, but I’ve got to tell you what I did. As I mentioned earlier, Taylor’s not a morning person, so I let both her and Zac sleep late. The next morning when Joe and I went out to hunt, Taylor was in her room, and Zac was in the lower sleeping quarters. Before daylight, I took one of my trail cameras, hid it on the banister and pointed it straight at Taylor’s room. When I came back and checked the camera, I had a picture of Taylor coming out of her room and headed to the bathroom. She got up again at 8:20 am and went to the bathroom. At 10:15 am, I got a picture of Zac peeking in her room to see if she was awake. She finally woke up and came out of her room at 10:30 am. So Dads, I want you to know that you can use trail cameras to monitor teenagers, just like you use trail cameras to monitor deer. I showed Zac and Taylor the pictures and said, “You two never know where I’m going to hang a trail camera.”

Tomorrow: What’s in the Future for PSE’s Mark Drury?

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Deer Hunting and Deer Management – A Family Activity for PSE’s Mark Drury and His Daughter Taylor


Taylor Drury - Drury Outdoors

Taylor Drury - Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note: Why would a daddy teach his daughter to hunt, and what are the benefits? This week, we’ll learn the answers to these questions and more from PSE’s Mark Drury of Drury Outdoors, a nationally known turkey caller and deer and turkey hunter. You’ll be surprised what you’ll learn about why every father should get his daughter into hunting.

Question: Mark, what do the other hunters think when you bring your daughter to hunting camp?
Drury: They love having Taylor in hunting camp. Anywhere we’ve ever hunted, she has always been welcomed. One of the things I’m most proud of about Taylor is that she always fits in great with everyone.

Question: What’s the worst problem you’ve had with Taylor about hunting?
Drury: Taylor is hard to wake up in the morning, and she doesn’t like to get up early for the morning hunt. That’s really the only problem that Taylor and I have had with hunting, and I have overcome the problem. Now, I usually hunt in the mornings by myself or with others, and Taylor and I hunt together in the afternoons. We seldom, if ever, hunt in the mornings together. I quit fighting that battle of trying to get her up. If she wants to sleep in, it’s no longer a big deal. I take my own advice in that when you take your daughter hunting, the hunting needs to be fun for her. Let her hunt the way she wants to hunt, instead of trying to force her to hunt the way you want to hunt.

Question: What PSE bow does Taylor shoot, and why?
Drury: Taylor shoots a PSE Chaos bow and pulls 36 pounds at a draw length of 24 inches. The Chaos delivers the most kinetic energy that she can get in a youth bow. More importantly, she loves that bow.

Question: What arrow and broadhead is she shooting, and why?
Drury: Taylor shoots a Carbon Force 100 Shaft arrow with a Magnus Stinger broadhead and the Rage 40KE broadhead.

Question: Mark, does Taylor scout with you before the season?
Drury: She sure does. Taylor likes to get all the cameras out, get them organized, and make sure they all have batteries and are working properly. When we go to put the cameras out, she likes to drive the 4 wheeler and drop me off, so I can hang the cameras. After the season, Taylor loves to go shed hunting. Taylor and I participate in many deer management activities besides just hunting. However, when the time comes to plow and plant the food plots, Taylor disappears. But, the rest of the year, she’s ready to go with me anytime I want to go. When she was little, Taylor loved to ride the tractor with me when I would plant the green fields, but I’m afraid she’s outgrown that. Her life is changing, she’s got her friends and her boyfriend, and I’m not the only man her life anymore.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Mark Drury on Getting to Know His Daughter’s Boyfriend through Hunting

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Mark Drury on His Daughter Taylor’s First Deer


Taylor Drury - Drury Outdoors

Taylor Drury - Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note: Why would a daddy teach his daughter to hunt, and what are the benefits? This week, we’ll learn the answers to these questions and more from PSE’s Mark Drury of Drury Outdoors, nationally known turkey caller and deer and turkey hunter. You’ll be surprised what you’ll learn about why every father should get his daughter into hunting.

Question: Mark, how old was Taylor when she graduated from target shooting to actual hunting in the woods?

Drury: Taylor took her first deer with a gun when she was 8 years old, but she didn’t take a deer with a bow until she was 12 years old. Taylor’s first bow kill was a 3 year old buck with a 105 inch rack. We practiced all summer until Taylor could pull and shoot 30 pounds on her bow. I attached a cut on contact Magnus Stinger broadhead on the front of her arrow shaft, and I told her that she couldn’t take a shot unless the deer came within 15 yards. When the buck came within 9 yards, Taylor smoked that shot and that buck. She was so excited and started crying, and I got excited and started crying. We got the whole hunt on video. That was one of my greatest hunts ever. Taylor has taken a deer every year with her bow since she was 12 years old, and this past year (2011) she took a really nice buck.

Question: Mark, what do you tell other dads about teaching their daughters how to bowhunt?

Drury: The number one question I get through emails and that people at consumer shows ask is, “How do I get my daughter into bowhunting?” Here are the three keys:

* Start her target shooting when she’s really young.

* Never push her. Don’t force your daughter to go shoot when she doesn’t want to do that.

* Always make shooting the bow fun. Make it fun for her age, not for your age. If she wants to take an iPod and play games, let her do it. If she wants to shoot pumpkins, let her shoot pumpkins. If she wants to shoot balloons, let her shoot balloons. Just make it a game. But then when she wants to take a deer, make sure she understands how to do that.

Question: Mark, what did Taylor say when she walked up to that first buck she took with her bow?

Drury: Taylor was so excited and also surprised that the deer was as big as it was. When Taylor took her first deer with a gun, she was taking dance classes at the time. She was so excited that she started doing cartwheels. I was just as excited, and I did a cartwheel too. I wanted Taylor to know that I was just as excited as she was about her taking her first deer. I believe that Taylor and I are as close as a father and daughter can be, because of all the fun we’ve had in the outdoors together. Each year, Taylor and I probably hunt around 30 or 40 days together.

Question: When you and Taylor are on the stand together, what do y’all discuss?

Drury: Lately, we talk about boyfriends more than anything else.

Tomorrow: Deer Hunting and Deer Management – A Family Activity for PSE’s Mark Drury and His Daughter Taylor 

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Mark Drury Tells How He’s Taught His Daughter Taylor to Love Bowhunting


 Taylor Drury - Drury Outdoors

Taylor Drury - Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note: Why would a daddy teach his daughter to hunt, and what are the benefits? This week, we’ll learn the answers to these questions and more from PSE’s Mark Drury of Drury Outdoors, a nationally known turkey caller and deer and turkey hunter. You’ll be surprised what you’ll learn about why every father should get his daughter into hunting.

Question: Mark, why did you teach Taylor to hunt?

Drury: From the day Taylor was born, I looked forward to taking her hunting with me. I wanted to introduce Taylor to my world, because most little girls are involved in their mothers’ worlds while the dad is gone. I wanted to know Taylor better and her to know my world. My brother Terry and I put Taylor in a tree stand with me when she was about 5 years old. Before we left the house, Tracy, my wife, told us, “Whatever you do, don’t put Taylor up a tree.” Knowing we were lying, we promised, “Oh, we won’t.” Terry helped me get Taylor up the tree, and she climbed the tree pretty well with my help; then she sat in my lap all afternoon. But, late in the evening when the time came to climb down out of the tree, Taylor was having a little bit of a problem. Terry was in the tree with us filming, and I told him, “I’ll go down the tree first, then you just drop her down to me, and I’ll catch her.” So, I got out of the tree, and Terry leaned over and dropped Taylor down to me. She only dropped about 5 feet. As soon as I caught her, Taylor said, “Daddy I want to do it again; let me climb up the tree.” But, I told her that we’d better go home. Our plan was to keep everything a secret from my wife Tracy, but when she found out what we had done, Tracy wouldn’t talk to me. However, she didn’t stay mad very long, she never does. The first time Taylor ever called in turkeys, she was wearing her red Sunday Easter dress with a white bow in her hair. We were on our family farm, and she was using a pushbutton call. When she started calling, three gobblers came storming in, and Taylor loved that excitement. Taylor has been in the outdoors with me a lot. Every chance I get to take Taylor with me, I load her up and take her to the woods.

Question: When did you start Taylor shooting a bow?

Drury: When she was about 5 years old. I think one of the reasons that Taylor likes to bowhunt now is that I’ve always made shooting the bow fun for her. Although I let Taylor shoot at a lot of different items, balloons were always her favorite. If she could hit a balloon and see and hear it pop, she would really get excited. I’ve blown up so many balloons for her, that sometimes I would feel like I was practically hyperventilating. The more accurately she shot, the smaller the size of balloons I would blow up. Before long, at 20 yards, Taylor could bust a balloon about the size of a softball with her bow.

Question: When Taylor was first shooting her bow, how long would each session last?

Drury: She’d shoot until I got tired of blowing up balloons. I never had to twist her arm to go shoot balloons.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Mark Drury on His Daughter Taylor’s First Bow Deer

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Mark Drury on Why He Shoots PSE Bows


Editor’s Note: “The first bow I ever had was a PSE,” Mark Drury (www.druryoutdoors.com) explains. Today, Mark and his brother Terry are two of the industry leaders in TV production and video production, having produced more than 200 feature length videos in more than two decades as well as almost 350 TV episodes for four outdoor shows.

PSE’s Mark Drury’s Five Tips to Becoming a Better Bowhunter

Mark, give us five tips for better bowhunting.
Tip #1: Find a safe place to shoot and practice. Start practicing at 70 to 80 yards, even if you’re accustomed to shooting at 40 and 50 yards. Purchase a bigger target than you’ve had at the shorter distances to keep you from losing arrows. Make yourself shoot at 70, 80, 90 and 100 yards. Five or 6 years ago bows weren’t made to produce those types of shots. But with the speed that PSE bows can produce today, if you can force yourself to shoot at 70 to 100 yards, then when you get a deer to within 30 yards, making the effective shot is like shooting fish in a barrel. Remember, you make yourself a better shot with a bow by shooting at longer distances.

Tip #2: Plant a food plot. Hunting over food sources is critical to successful bowhunting. So, plant food, food and more food.

Tip #3: Consider hunting over water in mid deer season. If the current weather trends continue like we’ve seen this summer in many parts of the country, water holes may be the magnets to draw in big bucks and help you put one of those bucks in the back of your pickup truck. If the country stays as dry as it is right now, the weather patterns will be similar to those in 2006, when hunting over water was the key to taking big bucks.

Tip #4: Plan to take a bowhunting vacation trip outside the region you usually hunt, even if it’s a do it yourself public lands hunt. You’ll become a better bowhunter with the more experience you build each season. You’ll learn how to hunt various terrains, and how to locate deer in different areas.

Tip #5: Hunt the Internet. Never in the history of hunting has there been so much information available to the bowhunter right at his archer fingertips. You can get aerial photos of the property you plan to hunt and helpful maps, and during the season, you can learn the weather conditions where you plan to hunt. Check out www.archerytalk.com, www.bowblitz.com, your favorite outdoor TV shows and your favorite Facebook pages. Listen to what the other hunters are seeing and observing, and you’ll be surprised at what you can learn that will help you become a better bowhunter. Any information about hunting that you pick up can be the difference between a successful and a non-productive hunt. For instance, if a hunter in your area reports that the deer have switched from feeding on agriculture to feeding on acorns, or that a buck has been seen working a scrape, you’ll know that the rut is starting. So, instead of just talking to the guys in your hunting camp or at the coffee shop, you can research the Internet and build up conversations on social media networks that will help you take more deer this season.

Nationally Known Hunters Mark and Terry Drury and PSE Bow Designs

Mark, what really influenced your decision to use PSE equipment?
There are several things, but the main factor was the PSE staff. Too, I saw the shift the company was making into developing some of the most highly technical bows available. PSE bows have better performance and more accuracy and speed than other bows on the market. No one can touch PSE bows for reduction in vibration and noise. Also, PSE’s 200 to 300 feet per second is faster than their closest competition within the same price range. In my opinion, PSE bows are the best bows on the market.

Is it true that you and your brother Terry have had some input on the PSE bows produced under the Bow Madness brand? 
Terry and I aren’t bow engineers, but PSE does have some of the best engineers in the business. Our input has been more in the way of voicing our likes and dislikes to the PSE engineers. We tell them things like, “We wish the bow could do this,” or “We wish the bow could do that,” and then the PSE engineers make it happen. We give suggestions on what we think will make a bow better, but the engineers in Tucson, Arizona, where PSE is located, make the magic happen. We make suggestions on what we think will make the bows shoot better, more quietly and faster, just like any seasoned bowhunter can. We try to apply our experiences from using the bows in hunting situations to help the engineers come up with better ways to make better products.

What’s the farthest shot you’ve ever made with a PSE bow?
Last year, in Alberta, Canada, I double lunged a mule deer at 62 yards. The deer ran about 100 yards and fell over dead. Ninety five percent of the deer I’ve ever taken with a bow have been within 25 yard shot ranges. Terry and I are very limited on the distance we’re willing to shoot. Our experience in hunting has taught us that a white tailed deer are very sensitive to noise and to hunters, so taking a shot more than 25 yards is difficult. I’m not saying that you can’t take deer at more than 25 yards, but it’s more difficult to take a deer at longer ranges. Of course, it also has a lot to do with the conditions where you’re hunting. If there’s wind noise, and the deer are fairly relaxed, then you can reach out further than 25 yards. Another factor that determines the range at which we take deer is the amount of time we spend scouting, along with information we’re able to gain from our trail cameras. Before we get into our trees to hunt, we’ve usually got a pretty good idea about where the deer are going, and from where they’re coming. We generally already know where the deer are headed, what time they’ll show up, and which spots where we should take our shots. Other productive information to know is the direction of the wind from the stands we use. We try not to hunt unless all the conditions are right to take a buck at close range from those stands.

Mark Drury EVO

PSE’s Mark Drury’s Equipment for Bowhunting Success

Mark, which bow do you shoot, and why?
I shoot the PSE X-Force Dream Season EVO. I have tendonitis in my left shoulder, so I’ve had to reduce the amount of weight I pull to 55 pounds. Even though I’m only shooting 55 pounds, this bow still delivers 315 feet per second. The bow is forgiving, and there’s no vibration, so it’s quiet. This is the best bow I’ve shot in my entire hunting career.

What other equipment do you use with your bow, like sights, releases, stabilizers, etc?
I shoot Rage Broadheads and IQ BowSights with Retinol Lock technology. This sight has a little green light with a black dot inside of it. If that black dot isn’t in the center of the green light, then there’s something wrong with the way I’m holding the bow. This indicator really has helped my accuracy. I shoot PSE Carbon Force arrows, a Tru Fire release and a PSE Phantom rest and stabilizer.

Why do you like that set up?
It’s the set up I’m accustomed to using and works for me. The IQ BowSight has made me a better shot. The Rage Broadhead is the most deadly broadhead I’ve ever shot. The Carbon Force arrows are the strongest arrows I’ve ever shot.

What tree stand and safety harness do you use, and why?
I use the Big Game The Boss XL Tree Stand, because it has a huge platform from which I can shoot. It’s well built with steel construction. I like a tree stand that helps me feel secure when I’m high up off the ground. I also use the new Tree Spider Livewire safety harness from Robinson’s Outdoors.

Why do you like the Tree Spider Livewire?
It’s lightweight and ergonomically designed, so you don’t even remember you’re wearing a safety harness when you wear it. The Livewire system will decelerate your fall to 1 mile per hour, allowing a slow descent to the ground from your tree stand.

PSE’s Mark Drury Explains When to Take the Shot

Mark, how do you decide when to take a shot on a deer?
I have to understand the deer’s posture, body position and mood. Next, I factor in his distance from me to determine if he’s within an effective range, generally about 40 yards or less. I also factor in whether the deer is calm, especially if I’ve decided to take that 40 yard shot. If the deer appears to be a little nervous, I’ll think twice about taking the shot. Too, I look at the deer’s body position. If the deer is broadside and quartering away, I’ve got the green light to shoot. However, if the deer’s not in that position, I won’t try to take the shot.

What do you do when a deer is within range to take a shot, and you’re at full draw, but the deer is looking at you?
For me, that’s a no shot. Chances are I won’t be at full draw, since I don’t go to full draw, until I know for certain that the deer’s body position is correct for me to take the shot. If the deer looks up and sees me, even if I’m at full draw, I won’t take the shot. However, everyone has to set up their own parameters for a shot. These rules are the ones that Terry and I have set for ourselves and the way we choose to play the game of bowhunting. I want to make as effective a shot as I can when I decide to release the arrow. More than likely I’ve spent a lot of time finding this deer, planting crops to feed this deer, watching this deer’s antlers grow over a year or two and making plans to take this deer. So, I don’t want to blow this hunt with a marginal shot. I’d rather not take the shot and be able to come back and hunt that buck another day.

PSE’s Mark Drury Explains What to Do When You Miss a Deer

Mark, do you ever miss a deer with your bow?
My brother Terry is the one who misses deer, not me. {grin} Of course, I miss deer. In fact, I miss deer every year.

Let’s say you’ve got a nice sized buck you want to take, and you miss him. How will you hunt that buck after you’ve missed him?
When you’re shooting a PSE bow, and you miss, you won’t blow the deer out of the country. When I’ve missed in the past, I don’t believe the deer even has known what’s happened. Missing a deer doesn’t have to be a deal breaker.

Tell us about a deer you’ve missed and then have returned and taken.
To be honest, I can’t remember missing a buck since I’ve been shooting my PSE bow, primarily because of the parameters I’ve set up. I’ve decided what constitutes when I take the shot, and when I don’t take the shot. In addition to the amount of time I spend practicing shooting, if the animal is 25 yards or less away from me, broadside and quartering away, it will be an automatic kill. Most times when you miss a deer, you’ve either rushed the shot or taken a marginal shot. Regardless of the size of the buck, I try not to ever take any marginal shots. Too, if I don’t take the shot, I’ve got a far greater chance of returning to that same stand and taking that same buck, especially if he hasn’t known I’m there.

After you’ve released the arrow and know you’ve hit the deer, how long do you wait before you start blood trailing?
After I release the arrow, I don’t take my eyes or ears off that animal, until he’s out of sight or hearing range. I watch the deer as long as I can, and when I no longer can see him, I try to listen for his movements or any sound he may make. If I don’t see or hear the deer fall, my cameraman and I usually will return to camp to watch the video we’ve taken of the hunt and the shot. We try to see where the arrow has gone, and if we’ve made a good hit. If I’ve made a double lung hit, I’ll wait for an hour or two before I start trailing the deer. If I’ve made a liver shot on the deer, I’ll usually wait 18 to 24 hours before I go find the blood trail and start tracking. If I see from the video that my arrow has hit the deer in the gut, I’ll also wait for 18 to 24 hours. All this also depends on the weather conditions.

What’s the farthest you’ve ever had a deer go after that deer has taken your arrow?
Probably 500 yards.

What’s the best shot you’ve ever made on a deer?
I’d have to say last year when I shot a mule deer at 62 yards. The shot was downhill, and my aim was dead on.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality products, click here.


Mark Drury – “Why I’m in the PSE Family”



Editor’s Note: “The first bow I ever had was a PSE,” Mark Drury explains. Today, Mark and his brother Terry are two of the industry leaders in TV production and video production. The Drurys have produced more than 200-feature-length videos in more than two decades. They’ve also produced 252-TV episodes that air on “Wildlife Obsession,” “Dream Season” and “Bow Madness” on the Outdoor Channel and “Natural Born Killers” on the Pursuit Channel.

Why Mark Drury Likes PSE Bows…

Question: What bow do you shoot now?
Drury: I shoot the X-force Omen Pro and the X-Force Dream Season EVO.

Question: Why do you like the Omen Pro and the Dream Season EVO?
Drury: I like the Dream Season EVO, because of its smooth draw, zero-felt recoil, a well-defined back wall and good speed. It’s a really-smooth hunting bow.  I like the Omen Pro, because I have a bad left shoulder. I can’t handle pulling a lot of weight. I pull 53 pounds on my Omen and 55 on my Dream Season EVO. The way I have that Omen Pro set up, I’m shooting 321 feet per second (fps).

Question: In the past, archers believed that the heavier-weighted bow you could pull, the bigger the deer you could shoot. I interviewed the legendary archer Howard Hill, and he was pulling a 100-pound longbow. Many archers brag about pulling 65 to 85 pounds. But you probably take as many big deer as anyone I know. How does only pulling 53 pounds equate to your ability to take those big bucks?
Drury: I’m shooting 5- and 6-year-old Midwestern deer that may weigh 300-pounds live weight and 225-245 pounds field-dressed weight. I’m shooting a Rage 2 Blade Broadhead, and it passes all the way through every deer I shoot.

Question: What arrow are you shooting?
Drury: I’m shooting a Carbon Force 100. No longer does a bowhunter have to think he’s a tough guy and pull a lot of heavy weight to take a big buck. Why pull and hold a heavy weight when can you pull less weight, hold it longer and still get an effective shot? Without PSE, I wouldn’t be able to shoot 321 fps with a 53-pound bow.

Question: How far are you able to take deer with that bow setup?
Drury: I shot a mule deer in Alberta this year at 62 yards. I made a double-lung hit, and the arrow was stuck-up in the dirt on the other side of the deer. That broadhead and arrow blew all the way through him at 62 yards with a 53-pound bow. PSE has really changed the dynamics of strength versus speed and accuracy. The difference to me in the bows I’m shooting now and those heavyweight bows I once shot is like the difference in shooting a pellet gun and now having a .223 centerfire rifle. That’s how dramatic the difference is. There’s just no comparison to the ease of shooting with lighter poundage today, compared to the difficulty of drawing, holding and shooting when we used those bows with more poundage.

Question: How do you decide which of your two bows to use?
Drury: I’ve been hunting a lot with the Omen Pro, because it’s the fastest of the two bows. But I’m going to play with this Dream Season EVO the rest of this year’s deer season and hunt with it next year.

Question: What other advantages have you found in using these PSE bows?
Drury: By shooting less poundage, I move less when I draw, because I can pull the string straight back without having to raise the bow up and push with one hand and pull with the other to get the string back. I just get on target with my bow and then pull the string straight back. Then I’m ready to shoot. I have no excess motion when I’m drawing the bow.

How to Find and Take Big Deer Within Bow Range

Question: Mark, we all see you and Terry taking big deer every year with your PSE bows. How are you able to consistently find and take those big deer?
Drury: The answer is observed movement. The more you hunt one piece of property or the more intimate you become with the place you’re hunting, the better you are at hunting the deer on that land. Soon, you’ll start to learn where, how and when deer move, and you’ll see consistent patterns that almost always will tell you where and when the older-age-class bucks will be. We’ve learned over the years that if you can separate the place the deer feed from the area where they bed, having a definite transitional zone that the deer can travel-through between feeding and bedding, you can set-up in those transitional zones. You can take an older-age-class buck with your bow if you’re hunting during the early season or the rut. Another tactic we use is what we call a, “green field within a green field.” When we plant our major green fields, we also plant a little strip of clover or some other type of late-season planting that will be green after the rut. We usually make this planting on the edge of our major food-plot planting. Then after the rut ends, we’ll set-up on the edge of that green field where we have our late-season crop, sometimes that’s clover, planted to take bucks after the rut.

Question: Mark how did you develop the green-field-within-a-green-field idea?
Drury: We started by planting a soybean field. The whitetails usually feed on those soybeans all summer long. But from mid-September to late-September, those soybean leaves turn brown, and no longer have food value for the deer. Any green fields on the edges of those soybean patches will start putting-out new foliage. So, I plant a green field around each soybean field between mid-August to late-August here in Missouri where I live and hunt. As the soybeans begin to die, the new young green fields start sprouting, so I don’t lose any of the deer that I’ve concentrated in an area with the soybeans during the summer and watched. By October, those bucks are so patterned to the edge of the soybean field where the green field is, that we can pick and choose the bucks we want to take.

Question: Besides clover, what are you planting, Mark?
Drury: I like Mossy Oak BioLogic Last Bite, a new product that I tested during the 2010 season for Mossy Oak BioLogic that will be available to plant in 2011. I also like BioLogic Winter Peas, Winter Bulbs and Sugar Beets and Maximum.

Question: Mark, most people believe to consistently take big bucks on a piece of property, you need to harvest some does. How many does do you take off the property you’re hunting?
Drury: You have to remember that you’re managing a deerherd, and that there are many factors that must be considered to answer that question. For instance, for the last several years, we’ve had some really-severe winters here in Missouri. So, we’ve been taking fewer does now than we did a few years ago when the winters were much milder. Deer are born at almost a 1-to-1 ratio. In other words, you should have 50% bucks and 50% does born each year. I use summer and fall trail-camera surveys to try to determine how many bucks versus does there are. From these surveys, I’ve learned that the buck-to-doe ratio can vary quite a bit on each individual property. I have one piece of land in Missouri that I hunt that has a very-low deer density. So, on that property I try to harvest about the same number of does as I do bucks. On some land I hunt in Iowa, there’s a large number of deer. I try to harvest or get my hunters to harvest 10 does to every 1 buck there. I’ve learned that deer management is property-specific. Until you use trail cameras and do a deer census on a particular piece of property, you can’t set-up a harvest-management prescription to keep your deerherd in balance and enable that herd to produce the maximum number of big bucks. I think you have really got to use your own survey system to determine if you have too-many of too-few deer. I believe the best way to do that is with the trail cameras, because they survey an area 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Mark Drury on Trail Cameras and Tree Stand Position

Question: Mark, you mentioned doing trail-camera surveys. What trail cameras are you using and why?
Drury: I use Reconyx trail cameras and try to put one camera per 50 acres. Right now I have 59 cameras out on 4,300 acres located in two-different places. Since some of that property where I’ve got the cameras has pasture land on it, when you exclude the pasture land, I’ve got about one camera per 50 acres. Many wildlife biologists suggest using one camera per 100 acres.

Question: When are you hunting the trails between the feeding and bedding places?
Drury: I hunt feeding areas exclusively in the afternoon. In the morning, I hunt transitional areas in-between the feeding and bedding regions (see Day 2), or I hunt close to the bedding places.

Question: How do you set-up your tree stand to get those deer within bow range?
Drury: I think one of the critical keys to taking a deer with a bow is to make sure I have easy access into that tree-stand site, so I don’t spook the deer I’m trying to take. I plant a lot of warm-season grasses too. When these grasses are mature, they will stand about 6-feet tall. I never walk straight to my tree stand. I create switchback trails that allow me to walk a zigzag pattern back and forth to my tree stand. I mow these trails before deer season arrives each year, and I make slow, lazy curves back and forth all the way to a tree-stand site. That mowed path allows me to walk almost completely silently to my stand, and the tall grasses keep the deer from seeing me go to my stand. I make my switchbacks more than 20- or 30-yards long. This way I can get in and out of my tree stand quickly and easily without spooking the deer and without leaving a large amount of scent. I also want to make sure that I’ve got a good consistent wind in my face,   and that I create my switchback trails in places where I believe there’s the least chance of deer coming from those directions. The real key to getting in your tree stand without spooking the deer is making sure the wind is right, moving quietly and unseen and getting into the stand scent-free without the deer knowing you’re there.

Question: Mark, what kind of tree stand are you using?
Drury: I use Big Game hang-on tree stands.

How Mark Drury Sets Up His PSE

Question: Mark, you told us on the first day of this interview that you made a shot and took a deer at 62 yards, but when you hang your tree stand, how close do you normally want the deer to be at your stand?
Drury: Five-years ago, I would have said that I wanted to make a 20- or 25-yard shot from my tree stand, but with my new PSE bows, I’ve learned that 40 yards is the new 20 yards. I was amazed at how flat the PSE Omen Pro and the Dream Season EVO shoot out to 40 yards. I’m consistently taking deer at 40 and 50 yards. Now let me explain. I practice my fanny off, and I shoot 40, 50, 70, 80, and 100 yards all summer long and throughout the bow season while practicing. I know at 100 yards I can shoot a 5- or 6-inch group, so at 40-50 yards I can easily shoot a 2-inch group. Although many of my shots will come at 25 and 22 yards, when you know you can shoot out to 100 yards and can group arrows within 1-2 inches at 40-50 yards, that 20- to 30-yard shot is just no big deal.

Question: When you’re shooting out at 40-50 yards, do you have any problem with the deer jumping the string (squatting before it leaves, causing the arrow to go over the deer)?
Drury: I believe that the worst distance for a deer to jump the string is at 25-30 yards. Deer can hear so well at that distance that they still have enough time to drop down before they jump. However, when a deer’s standing at 40 or 50 yards, and there’s any wind at all or any background noise, I don’t have any trouble with the deer trying to jump the string, especially since I have quiet arrow flight. The only time that I have a problem with the deer trying to jump the string at 40 or 50 yards is when the woods and the wind are dead calm.

Question: If woods and the wind are dead calm, and you feel the deer may hear the bow fire when the deer’s at 40-50 yards, where will you aim?
Drury: If the buck’s alert because he knows I’m there or perhaps I’ve made a sound to stop him, I’ll aim for his heart. Then if he does drop-down (tries to jump the string), I still get a double-lung shot. If the buck’s calm and has his head down, I’ll aim, so that the arrow will pass-through both lungs.

Question: How is your bow sighted-in?
Drury: With the Omen Pro and the Dream Season EVO, I sight-in an inch low at 20 yards, 2-inches low at 30 yards, and 2-3-inches low at 40 and 50 yards. I do this so that I can aim dead-on. The deer naturally will want to drop a little bit, but if I aim dead-on and the deer drops a couple of inches, I’ve still got him. If he doesn’t move, I’ve still got him.

Question: Are you only shooting one pin?
Drury: No, but I’m setting each one of my pins to shoot low instead of dead-on.

Mark Drury Explains some of the Mistakes that Bowhunters Make

Question: Mark, what are you doing to keep your PSE Omen Pro and Dream Season EVO bows quiet?
Drury: I put String Leeches made by Sims Vibration Laboratory on the string. Other than that, I don’t do anything, because these two bows come quiet as a church mouse from the factory.

Question: What are some of the biggest mistakes bowhunters make when hunting with their bows?
Drury: I think they get too nervous. They think the deer is leaving them and will take a shot at the wrong angle to the deer’s body. Instead always make sure you wait for either a broadside or a quartering-away shot. I call this wrong-angle shooting, “taking dumb angles.” The reason dumb angles occur is because:
* your adrenaline kicks-in when you see that monster buck, and that adrenaline causes you to get excited and want to shoot the buck quickly. You forget to shoot him accurately and at the right angle;
* you’re drawing back before you’re ready to take the shot. I almost never draw, unless I know I’m about to shoot. If a deer sees you draw, he’ll be gone before you can get-off the shot. The deer will always win a Mexican stand-off;
* most hunters believe they only can hunt days with the right weather. But I think what’s more important is not to hunt the wrong days. If the day’s a low-pressure cloudy day that will force your scent down to the ground, stay out of areas where you’re trying to take a big buck. Wait for the day when you feel certain the deer will move. Only hunt a really-big buck on the days that all conditions are right for hunting that big buck;
* you’ve got to be a slave to the wind. You cannot ignore wind direction. When you’ve decided to hunt a certain stand, don’t go to that stand until that wind condition is present. I wear ScentBlocker clothing from top to bottom in as many layers as possible. However, even so, I’m not going to hunt with the wrong wind. I continuously spray down with ScentBlocker’s Ti4 Titanium. I recharge my clothes every 2-3 days and keep them in a scent-proof environment. I’m religious about trying to eliminate or neutralize the scent on my body and equipment.

Question: What clothing are you wearing when you’re in the tree stand that keeps you quiet when you draw?
Drury: I wear the ScentBlocker Dream Season and the Dream Season Cold Fusion clothing. ScentBlocker has the soft-shell technology that’s amazing at keeping me quiet.

Question: You’ve told us today what all you do to take deer on the land that you own, but what do you do when you go on new property to find and take deer?
Drury: I don’t go on new property. I haven’t left my land in the last 4 years. I do hunt in Wyoming, but even there I’ve got certain places that I hunt every year. For years, my brother Terry who’s my partner in Drury Outdoors and I attempted to find the land that had better-sized bucks than we had hunted on the year before. We were running all over the country continuously searching for more-productive places to take bigger and better bucks. Finally, we decided that instead of trying to find a better spot to hunt, we would make the places we had to hunt better. Each and every year I try to improve the land where I’m hunting. I watch my deer all year long, and after the season I may go in and move stands and add stands or create additional food plots or new routes to some of my favorite tree stands. We’ve doing this for so long that we now have tree stands that we can hunt from with any wind direction and trails going to those tree stands cut, so that we won’t spook any deer either going to or away from the stands. I think you’ll save more money and be more successful every year taking older-age-class bucks, if you make the places you hunt better instead of hunting for better places to hunt.

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