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Jason Patterson Says Bowhunters May Only Need a Magic 50 Acres


Jason Deer Hunting

PSE’S Jason Patterson

Editor’s Note: The best thing that we can do as parents is to give our children memories that will last their lifetimes and impart the values and beliefs that we want them to teach to their children. By spending time with our children they learn the importance of family and the need to spend time with their children once they have them. Jason Patterson of Jackson, Tennessee, a member of PSE’s Field Staff, has found that bowhunting with his PSE bow is the thread that connects the generations in his family.

Most bowhunters believe that the more property they have to hunt, the more deer they can harvest, and the greater odds they’ll have for taking trophy bucks. However, PSE Field Staff member Jason Patterson has learned that the number of acres that you have to hunt isn’t nearly as important as the type and the quality of the property you hunt. As hunting leases continue to increase in price, more bowhunters who want to lease private lands are finding smaller properties that they can lease and manage to produce the maximum number of deer. When you have a small hunting lease close to home, you can hunt that lease more effectively, learn the deer’s movement patterns and often take more deer than you can take, if you have large lease further away from your home and work. “I have a place to hunt right outside the city limits of Jackson, Tennessee, where I live,” Patterson explains. “I have had these 50 acres for the last couple of years, and I’ve been trying to manage it by taking as many does as we can. Last year when I got my PSE Evo, I was amazed at how fast it shot. I am an outbound supervisor at Old Dominion Freight Lines. My hunting place is only about 15 minutes from my work, and I don’t have to go into work until 11:00 am. So, one morning before work, I was hunting this small 50 acre plot that had one, 1 acre green field. This 50 acre plot is surrounded by kudzu and sage that’s about head high, creating the perfect place for deer to bed, because there are small wooded lots all around the sage and kudzu. Too, I had planted clover in the green field. I hunt away from the field in the wooded lots when the acorns start dropping. We have a small shooting house on the edge of the field, and that’s where I let Oakley hunt during gun and deer season and shoot does. Last season Oakley took four does with his rifle. Last year I took my first buck with my PSE Evo. I’d taken several does with the Evo already, and there were two does and a buck on the field. My original plan was to take one of the does. Then the buck presented a shot at 42 yards. I’d never taken a deer that far away before with my bow. I’d started practicing in May before deer season arrived in October. I was shooting accurately out to 60 yards and was really surprised at all the new innovations present in the new PSE Evo. When I consistently could put arrows in a pie plate at 60 yards, I felt really confident about my shooting ability inside 60 yards.

Jason Patterson Hunting

Oakley Patterson

So, when the buck presented a broadside shot, I took it and double lunged the deer. The deer only went about 120 yards after taking the arrow. I also felt confident about the shot, because I’d been taking does regularly. We were trying as hard as we could to take as many does as possible off the property, since we realized this little 50 acre plot was a perfect deer magnet. The deer had a place to bed, a green field to feed on during the late fall and winter and numerous acorn trees to feed on during the early season. We realized that the more does we took, the more bucks the land could support. We were attempting to take all the does we legally could harvest.”

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Jason Patterson Says “Start Children Out Young on PSE Bows”


Bows

Oakley Patterson

Editor’s Note: The best thing that we can do as parents is to give our children memories that will last their lifetimes and impart the values and beliefs that we want them to teach to their children. By spending time with our children they learn the importance of family and the need to spend time with their children once they have them. Jason Patterson of Jackson, Tennessee, a member of PSE’s Field Staff, has found that bowhunting with his PSE bow is the thread that connects the generations in his family.

According to Jason Patterson, “I started my son Oakley shooting a bow when he was 10, because with the bow he could shoot a lot more than he could with a deer rifle. He didn’t have to go to a shooting range to shoot his bow, as long as he had a good backstop. I think shooting the bow provides more of a challenge for a youngster than shooting a gun. But don’t get me wrong   Oakley and I gun hunt too. I like teaching Oakley to shoot his bow, because it’s something I can do with him. I can teach him about form and how to aim and also pull arrows for him. I get to be with Oakley, instead of him sitting in front of the TV set or playing a video game. I’ve learned that youngsters think shooting a bow is cool, which is very important. He gets to shoot a lot, especially during the summer months when he goes bowfishing. He’s improving his skills as an archer when he’s shooting at fish. Whether he takes a fish or not, he’s using his mechanical release, drawing the bow, creating muscle memory and learning to hold the bow steady – all elements he’ll need during deer season. I know that shooting the bow is becoming more and more popular in many school systems.  Oakley still loves to shoot a gun, but if you give him a choice between shooting a gun or a bow, Oakley will opt for the bow.”

Bow Hunting PSE

PSE’S Jason Patteron’s Son Oakley

With technology being so much a part of youngster’s everyday world, and with parents often having to work two jobs or perhaps both mom and dad both working to support the family, youngsters don’t have much of an opportunity to get out to hunt and fish as children did 20 or 30 years ago. But according to Jason Patterson, “With bowhunting and shooting the bow, if we have an hour or two after Oakley comes in from school and on Saturday, we can go out in the back yard and shoot the bow. If we both have activities on Saturday, we still can go bowfishing on Saturday night. If I have a chance to go deer hunting, Oakley can go with me. I want to teach Oakley to bowhunt so that some day he can teach my grandchildren or another youngster how. That idea makes me feel good that I’ve done the best that I can to pass my love of archery down to Oakley and possibly to future generations. I’m willing to give up all the animals I’ve ever taken and all the animals I may take in the future for Oakley to have the chance to take those animals.  I feel like I’m making an investment for my grandchildren by taking Oakley bowhunting and bowfishing. Last year Oakley took his first deer during the youth season. He had missed deer before, but this was the first time he had connected. When I saw the joy and the excitement in his face that time was the happiest I’d ever been in my life. Then he took three more does that same season. I have learned that when I take Oakley deer hunting, the hunt is all about him. When he’s ready to leave, I have to be ready to leave.”

When PSE asked Oakley Patterson what he liked about shooting a bow, his answer was simple and direct, “It’s just plain ole fun.” When we asked him about his bow fishing trips, he said, “I never thought I would get to go bowfishing. That was a lot of fun too. When I saw other people taking fish with their bows, I was ready to start shooting. At first I missed a number of fish, but then I started getting better and better. I shot a carp that weighed about 11 pounds. I like spending time with my dad, and I like shooting my bow. I can’t wait to go bowhunting this season.” I think Oakley explained for all of us why we should consider teaching youngsters to shoot their bows when they’re ready and have the “want” to do that.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Jason Patterson Tells the Difficulty of Taking a Short Bowhunting Shot


PSE Field Staff

PSE’S Jason Patterson

Editor’s Note: The best thing that we can do as parents is to give our children memories that will last their lifetimes and impart the values and beliefs that we want them to teach to their children. By spending time with our children they learn the importance of family and the need to spend time with their children once they have them. Jason Patterson of Jackson, Tennessee, a member of PSE’s Field Staff, has found that bowhunting with his PSE bow is the thread that connects the generations in his family.

“One morning I went to my little 50 acre hunting lease just before daylight,” Patterson explains. “I didn’t see any deer for awhile, but after daylight I heard a rustling in the leaves behind me and turned to see a big doe coming toward me. She walked right under my stand, and I shot her at 7 yards.” The straight down shot is one of the most difficult shots that a bowhunter has to make, mainly due to most shooters practicing shooting from 10 to 40 yards. Very rarely do people climb into tree stands in their back yards and shoot at targets from zero to 10 yards from the tree stands. Therefore, the deer in super close like this doe was is often the most difficult shot for the bowhunter to make. However, Patterson had learned the hard way how to make this close in shot.

Patterson Deer Hunting

Oakley Patterson

“I learned the hard way to make this shot, because I had missed a deer earlier in the season that was in close,” Patterson says. “So, I talked to a friend of mine who is also a Mossy Oak manager, is really big in archery and also works with PSE. I called him and said, ‘I don’t know what I’m doing wrong. I had a doe at 5 yards from my tree stand, and I shot over her back.’ My friend, Parrish Elliott, told me, ‘Jason, when you have a deer that close, use your 40 yard pin to aim.’ I thought my friend on the other end of the phone line had lost his mind. But he encouraged me to get in my tree stand, set up a target at 5 yards and shoot it with my 40 yard pin. That’s what I did. I realized with the 40 yard pin as an aiming point I could take a deer in close. Although I told my friend about the one doe that I’d missed, I didn’t tell him about the other two earlier that had been in too close for me to shoot. When I started using that 40 yard pin, I found out as unbelievable as it was that I could aim with it successfully at a deer from zero to 10 yards from my tree stand and make a successful shot. I have to admit I had to practice and build up my confidence in aiming with that 40 yard pin, before I believed that this strategy actually would work. On this morning when that doe came in at 7 yards, I aimed like I had been practicing. To my surprise, the arrow hit where it was supposed to hit, and I recovered the doe. Believe it or not I learned that making the 5 yard shot was far more difficult than a 40 yard shot. I’ve talked to many other bowhunters with this same issue. I shot that doe through the top of the shoulder, and the arrow went out through her heart. She only went about 30 yards before she piled up.”

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Bowfishing for Fun, Excitement and a Tool to Train Youngsters with Jason Patterson


Bowfishing

Oakley Patterson

Editor’s Note: The best thing that we can do as parents is to give our children memories that will last their lifetimes and impart the values and beliefs that we want them to teach to their children. By spending time with our children they learn the importance of family and the need to spend time with their children once they have them. Jason Patterson of Jackson, Tennessee, a member of PSE’s Field Staff, has found that bowhunting with his PSE bow is the thread that connects the generations in his family.

Jason Patterson was introduced to bowhunting many years ago by walking the banks of creeks and rivers and shooting fish from the bank. One day Jennifer McKinney, a Mossy Oak Pro Staffer, called Patterson, an area manager for Mossy Oak, and said, “Why don’t you and Oakley go with me and my crew bowfishing? I think Oakley really will enjoy it, because he’ll get to shoot a lot. So Patterson talked to his son Oakley about the bowfishing trip, and they decided to go this past June. “We were going to fish the Tennessee River near Camden, Tennessee,” Patterson explains. “I had never bowfished like this before, using halogen lights that shined down in the water and a deck where you could stand and shoot.  That first night we went out on the water about 9 pm on Kentucky Lake, a lake on the Tennessee River that had a lot of grass in it this year. We moved into the shallow grass, saw fish in the light and shot at them. The buffalo carp, needle nose gar and catfish were moving into this shallow grass to feed at night. Since we could see those fish in shallow water, we thought taking those fish with our bows would be easy. But we soon learned that being successful at taking fish with our bows isn’t as easy as we had thought.” Jason and Oakley Patterson each shot at fish 100 times if not more. And, as Patterson remembers, “We missed a lot more fish than we hit. But we intended to learn more about this form of bowhunting. I also realized that bowfishing was an excellent sport for youngsters.”

When you bowfish on a lake or on a river with numbers of fish in its shallow water, youngsters will have nonstop action.  Hunting is fun for youngsters but shooting is even more fun. And, shooting at lots of fish is as good as shooting can be. “We didn’t come off the water until about 4:00 am.,” Patterson reports. “About midnight we ran out of gas for the generator that powered the halogen lights from the boat. When we went back to the dock to get more gas, I asked Oakley if he was ready to go home and go to bed. He quickly said, ‘No, sir, I want to stay longer.’”

Staying up late at night with grown folks is a big deal for youngsters anyway, and then shooting his bow at night and taking a few fish is an adventure that Oakley can tell all his friends and relatives about for the rest of his life. And, Oakley was having fun. “Oakley was really excited about the whole bowfishing program,” Patterson says. “We shot grass carp, buffalo carp and longnose gar, and we had a few chances to shoot catfish.” On his first trip, Oakley took three fish, and his dad took six. “We probably missed at least 150 each,” Patterson reports as he laughs. “I learned that bowfishing could be a very humbling sport. Jennifer McKinney was nice enough to ask us to go a second time. This time we took about 25 fish and two big catfish, one weighing 18 pounds. Although Jennifer also took a nice catfish, once again, we missed more fish than we took.” On this trip, Oakley took a 40 inch gar that weighed about 9 pounds.

Jennifer McKinney

PSE’S Jason Patterson and Jennifer McKinney

Oakley was set on fire about bowfishing. Patterson has an aluminum boat, and he’s already thinking about rigging it up with a platform and lights. Then he and Oakley can bowfish anytime they want. They are also considering each getting a new PSE Wave bow to use for bowfishing. The Wave, designed for bowfishing, should help Jason and Oakley improve on the number of fish they’re taking on each outing. On their first two bowfishing trips, Jason was shooting his PSE Evo, and Oakley was shooting his PSE Chaos. All they had to do was attach a spinning reel to each of these bows and then attach the line from the reel to the fiberglass arrows they were shooting.

“Bowfishing is relatively inexpensive, because you can use any of the bows you have to most any closed face spinning reel and an arrow with a tip on it from Muzzy,” Patterson explains. “Oakley and I both had a blast bowfishing and stayed busy shooting and reloading almost all night long. These two trips provided chances for Oakley and me to really bond and be together. Oakley likes to shoot his bow, and with bowfishing, he had continuous action all night long. I really enjoyed seeing him shoot.’”

Don’t forget that there’s a learning curve in bowfishing, because instead of aiming dead on you have to shoot instinctively and try to aim under the fish. You have to calculate your aiming point with the depth of the water. The fish isn’t usually sitting still – you’re shooting at a moving target. Sometimes the action is so fast that instead of aiming, you have to react, draw and release the bow. In most of the South where temperatures may be in the high 90s and even over 100 degrees in the summertime, often the weather’s too hot for most people to sit in the boat in daylight hours. However, when the sun goes down, the moon comes up, and the temperatures fall, bowfishing can be a pleasant experience. You can build your muscle memory, while practicing a different style of archery.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Jason Patterson’s Son Led Him back to Bowhunting


PSE Field Staff

PSE’S Jason Patterson

Editor’s Note: The best thing that we can do as parents is to give our children memories that will last their lifetimes and impart the values and beliefs that we want them to teach to their children. By spending time with our children they learn the importance of family and the need to spend time with their children once they have them. Jason Patterson of Jackson, Tennessee, a member of PSE’s Field Staff, has found that bowhunting with his PSE bow is the thread that connects the generations in his family.

Jason Patterson has been shooting PSE bows for the last 3 years and before that shot PSE bows for many years. But he left the sport of bowhunting some time ago, because waterfowl hunting near where he lived was so much better than the deer hunting. But 3 years ago, he got back into bowhunting. He remembered how dependable and technical his PSE bows always had been when he shot PSE bows earlier. So, he wanted to go back to shooting PSE bows but he also had another reason a much deeper reason for returning to PSE his son Oakley. “PSE produces one of the top bows in the nation right now. I grew up in southern Indiana, and all my life I’d been a deer hunter. I moved to Tennessee when I was about 20 years old. At that time, deer hunting in Tennessee wasn’t as good as it had been in Indiana. Yes, the state had plenty of deer, but the bucks were smaller than Indiana bucks. So, I switched over to rifle hunting. Then I got bit by the waterfowl bug and forgot about deer hunting for a little while.

Oakley

Oakley Patterson

Then when my son Oakley turned 6 years old, he wanted to try deer hunting. We started gun hunting for deer. Oakley is 12 now. When he was 10 1/2 years old, he got his first bow and is shooting the PSE Chaos. I had talked to Blake Shelby, the marketing director for PSE, and PSE’s Bobby Vargas. We decided Oakley was just now getting strong enough to pull the Chaos and be able to hunt with it. Because the Chaos is such an adjustable bow, as Oakley grows and becomes stronger, we can increase his draw length and increase the weight that he is able to pull. Right now he’s pulling 38 pounds, although he started at 32 pounds. Too, since we’ve gotten into bowfishing, Oakley has started drawing his bow and shooting much more, which has made him stronger. I’m the area manager for Mossy Oak Camouflage. One of the pro staffers for Mossy Oak I work with, Jennifer McKinney, invited Oakley and me to go bowfishing with her. That one bowfishing trip really set Oakley on fire. We’re bowfishing more and more this summer. As Oakley draws his Chaos and shoots it, the stronger his muscles will be, and the more weight he can pull.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


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