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Trail Camera Strategies for PSE Bowhunters with Glenn Eilers


PSE Bowhunter

PSE Bowhunter

Editor’s Note: When Glenn Eilers of Shelbyville, Kentucky, discovered PSE bows 8 years ago, he decided he’d found a bow that was made for him. He’s been able to use PSE bows to take some really nice whitetails.

I believe our trail camera strategy is one of the reasons we can keep up with our bucks so well, and determine how, where and when to take these bucks. We put out 40 trail cameras on both pieces of property that we hunt at the first of July to inventory our deer herd and to try and determine which bucks may be potential shooters. As the bucks’ antlers grow, we can tell if they’re expressing the genetic characteristics of the bucks we photographed the previous year. Then we can tell if the bucks we passed up last year still will be available for harvest this year. We’re trying to cover about 4,000 acres and not only determine what bucks we’ll have to hunt at the opening of bow season, but also where these bucks are traveling. Once we find four or five really good bucks that we want to hunt, then we may take down a lot of the other trail cameras we have out. If we’ve located the bucks that we want to harvest at the first of bow season, we may remove our cameras out of the woods and not put them back up until about 2 weeks before bow season arrives.

One of the reasons we don’t have to leave our trail cameras out the entire months of July and August is because we have quite a few food plots planted. Generally the deer will be hidden in the food plots. Once they establish trails going to and from the food, they’re happy, and they’re usually not going to change their routes of travel. When we go in 2 weeks before the season to put our trail cameras out again, we’re also picking the trees where we’ll hang our tree stands and determining the wind direction we must have to have to hunt from that stand. We’ve learned from our camera surveys that some of the bucks are super stars. For whatever reason, they love to be in front of the camera. Other bucks are much more shy. You’ll never get them right in front of the camera, but you’ll see them on the outer edges of the pictures.

Another important ingredient that we believe helps us to be successful growing and holding big bucks is that we don’t hunt our property during gun season. This way, we’re creating a sanctuary for older bucks from surrounding lands, where they’ll have plenty of food and little hunter disturbance. This tactic usually pays off best in the late season, after the gun season has ended in both Kentucky and Indiana. We allow the gun hunters to drive the older age class deer onto our property during gun season, and we’ll have an opportunity to take those bucks after gun season is over. When we go into the woods, we’re either checking our trail cameras or attempting to take bucks with our bows.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Glenn Eilers’ PSE X-Force Dream Season 10 Point Buck


Glenn Eilers

Glenn Eilers

Editor’s Note: When Glenn Eilers of Shelbyville, Kentucky, discovered PSE bows 8 years ago, he decided he’d found a bow that was made for him. He’s been able to use PSE bows to take some really nice whitetails.

The 3,000 acre property we hunt in Kentucky is right on the banks of the Ohio River. We also have 1,500 acres of land directly across the river in Indiana from our Kentucky property. The Indiana property is a 2 minute boat ride from the Kentucky lands or an hour’s drive. We’d taken pictures of this buck during the summer, but the bow season in Indiana didn’t open until October 1st. When we hunt that property, most of the members of our club shotgun hunt. But, I prefer to hunt with a bow, like I’ve hunted exclusively for the last 15 years. I knew about where this deer was living, because we had several trail cameras in that area. So, I took an aerial photograph and begin to put together a plan to hunt this deer. When I marked the location of the trail cameras that had taken pictures of this buck, I noticed there was a pinch point/funnel area on one side of a very thick area where I assumed does would be. But, I’d never hunted this place before.

I took a climbing stand with me, found a tree that I could put my tree stand on and then spotted about 2 dozen rubs on smaller trees there. Some of these trees however, were about the size of my thigh. So, I climbed up my tree early in the afternoon and did a little rattling and some grunting. About 1 1/2 hours before dark, I spotted this buck coming down the edge of a cedar thicket with his nose in the air, trying to determine if there were any does in that thicket that were ready to breed. I let the buck keep coming, until he walked right under my stand. I took the shot when the buck was about 5 yards from the base of my tree. Most of the time, I take shots at about 10 yards. Fifteen yards is usually the maximum range at which I shoot my bow. This buck was a 10 point that scored in the 160s. Oftentimes, if you keep up with where each of your trail cameras is located, and you get several pictures of a buck coming into a section of land where those cameras are taking his picture, if you’ll study an aerial photo, you often can determine where the buck’s coming from and possibly where he’s going. Then you’ll set up your tree stand in the vicinity of your trail cameras after identifying a funnel or a pinch point that the buck more than likely has had to walk through to get to those cameras. Oftentimes that’s the key to success.

Tomorrow: Trail Camera Strategies for PSE Bowhunters with Glenn Eilers

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Glenn Eilers Explains the Buck He Took While His Cameraman Filmed


Glenn Eilers

Glenn Eilers

Editor’s Note: When Glenn Eilers of Shelbyville, Kentucky, discovered PSE bows 8 years ago, he decided he’d found a bow that was made for him. He’s been able to use PSE bows to take some really nice whitetails.

Last season, I had a Mossy Oak cameraman with me, and we were trying to take a buck that scored 150 as an 8 pointer and had 9 inch brow tines. This buck also fell to my PSE Bow Madness. I had trail camera pictures of this buck, so we had identified the deer we were trying to take. We hunted the first week of the season. The first afternoon, the weather was about 100 degrees, and of course the buck didn’t show up. We’ve learned that even though the velvet antler deer are generally very predictable, the weather also plays a major role in when they move and don’t move. In extremely hot weather, they’ll often lie in cool, shady places and not move and feed until after dark, when the weather’s cooler. That’s what happened on this hunt. You have to remember when you’re using trail cameras to keep up with the deer’s movement patterns that the weather, the rut, the availability of food, the hunting pressure and many other factors can cause the deer not to show up when and where they’re supposed to show up. Also, even when you’ve got a deer nailed down like we thought we had this deer, if the region has a bad wind, you’re better off to back out. Don’t try to hunt that deer. Wait for the conditions to be right, before you go back and attempt to take him. When you’re hunting a buck 4 years old and older, you only may get one or two chances each season to try and bag that buck. Don’t blow your chances by trying to hunt him when the weather and the wind conditions aren’t right.

We returned to our hunting site the next day, in the middle of the day, and checked our trail camera. We saw that the deer had come in after dark. We knew he was still there, but the weather was so hot, we figured he probably wouldn’t come down the trail before sundown. The third day of the season, we had a cool front come through, and the temperature was 30 degrees cooler – about 70 degrees. This buck had another buck with him, and they both jumped the fence coming into the alfalfa field. We were able to watch the two bucks for about 15 minutes as they kept coming closer and closer. When the buck I wanted to take was at 15 yards, I drew my PSE Bow Madness and released the arrow. This buck scored in the 150s and was a fine trophy.

Tomorrow: Glenn Eilers’ PSE X-Force Dream Season 10 Point Buck

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Glenn Eilers Tells About the Buck That Vanished


Glenn Eilers

Glenn Eilers

Editor’s Note: When Glenn Eilers of Shelbyville, Kentucky, discovered PSE bows 8 years ago, he decided he’d found a bow that was made for him. He’s been able to use PSE bows to take some really nice whitetails.

In 2009, I had good trail camera pictures all summer long of the buck I planned to take that year. However, when he rubbed the velvet off his antlers, he vanished. I finally caught up to the buck in November where he was about 1/2 mile away from the place where I’d seen him all summer. I still could get trail camera pictures of this buck. But, after studying pictures from several different locations, this buck didn’t seem to have an established movement pattern. The way I finally caught up to this buck was I noticed he’d come into an area where does were bedded down. Then he’d use his nose to try and determine if a doe that was coming into estrus was in that bedding area. So, I set up my portable treestand downwind of the bedding area and waited on the buck to arrive. I had seen this buck the year before, and he would’ve scored about 150 then. But, I could tell then by his body size and his rack that he was only about a 3 year old deer. After I harvested my deer in 2008, I continued to try and keep up with this deer with my trail cameras to make sure he made it through gun season.

During gun season, we don’t hunt our deer with guns, but instead, let our property be like a sanctuary. When gun season was putting a lot of pressure on the bucks around our property, they could find food and sanctuary on our property. When I saw this buck in the winter of 2008, I didn’t get a reflection from the deer’s left eye on my trail camera pictures. So, I knew he had an injury on his left eye. Once I finally took this buck in November of 2009, his left eye was damaged, and I don’t know whether it was from a buck fight or not. As a result of having his left eye damaged, his left antler grew a couple of extra points on it. He scored in the 185 range, and I took that deer with my PSE Bow Madness.

Tomorrow: Glenn Eilers Explains the Buck He Took While His Cameraman Filmed

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Better Deer Hunting Tactics with PSE and Glenn Eilers


Using trail cams with deer

Using trail cams with deer

Editor’s Note: When Glenn Eilers of Shelbyville, Kentucky, discovered PSE bows 8 years ago, he decided he’d found a bow that was made for him. He’s been able to use PSE bows to take some really nice whitetails.

I had shot another bow for several years, before I got my first PSE . The first thing that caught my attention on the PSE bow was the grip. Then, when I started shooting the bow, I liked the speed that it produced and the smoothness of the draw. My first PSE bow was the PSE Firestorm X. I liked this bow because it was really short – only 28 inches axle to axle. I was excited about the ergonomics in this little bow. Because it was small, I felt it was a perfect tree stand bow. I also liked its one cam design, and the draw cycle it had. The bow just felt great from the time I picked it up, to the time I released the arrow. The first two seasons I had this bow, I shot two nice bucks in the velvet. I took a 145 class 10 point, and I shot a main frame 8.

Kentucky’s bow deer season begins the first Saturday in September. We usually have about 2 weeks to hunt when the bucks’ antlers still are in the velvet. Usually about the middle of September, they start scraping the velvet off their antlers. I found these two bucks by using trail cameras, which we begin putting out about the first of July near mineral licks and/or corn. We’ve learned that until the bucks shed their velvet, they’re usually in bachelor groups. When they’re on their summer patterns, they’re extremely predictable, unless an area has inclement weather. I had hundreds of pictures of both these bucks before I took them. On the land I hunt, we inventory all of our bucks and name them. Then, we make up a hit list of the bucks we want to take that season. We’re trying to only take bucks that are 4 1/2 years old or older. The deer I shot in 2009, I’d seen the previous year on my trail camera, with the deer I took in 2008. By putting out trail cameras while the deer are in the velvet, you can not only identify the buck you want to take this year, but most of the time you can pick out the buck you want to take the next year. I’ve learned that trail cameras, especially when the deer are in the velvet, can provide the information that you need for one to two seasons. We use trail cameras extensively, especially before the season.

Tomorrow: Glenn Eilers Tells About the Buck That Vanished

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


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