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Holding a First Bow Kill Close to Heart by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

PSE's Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson

I hope the thrill of my first deer kill doesn’t fade away too quickly from my memory. There is something truly wonderful about the whole experience, and I’m sure I am not alone in the endeavor to hold a first bow kill close to heart, and safely tucked into the deep recesses of one’s mind.

I still remember the feeling – it was as if time stood still.

Morning

Morning of First Hunt

The morning of my first whitetail deer hunt I found myself up in a tree stand for the first time in my life, and just as I was getting comfortable with the distance from my feet to the ground below, the silence was interrupted by the sound of brittle leaves being crushed. Something was making its way along the path below, and closing the distance to our stand fast. I glanced up at my husband above in a tree stand, attached to the same tree as mine, and smiled. We watched together in anticipation of what was coming our way. It didn’t take long for the disrupter of the morning silence to make an appearance, and from our perch above the ground we could clearly see the mule deer as he made his way along the path below. Our tags said “whitetail” so we watched and admired the buck as he continued on his morning journey.

Emily Anderson

As a western hunter who is used to hunting from the ground, spot and stalk style, this new view from above had me intrigued and fascinated. I loved being above the action and felt like a giddy school girl when again the sound of *crunch* *crunch* echoed through the trees, signaling the closing distance of another buck. We watched a buck work his way down from the field above and mosey around a big oak towards my side of the tree. After a brief nonverbal discussion, my husband nodded, giving me the green light to take a shot. I slowly reached for my bow, took a breath, came to full draw, picked a spot and settled my top pin. The arrow released and I watched as it made impact on the chosen spot. Thwack!

I remember looking at my husband, looking back at my deer running down the path, looking back at my husband, and then starting to shake uncontrollably. It was an adrenaline rush like none other I’ve ever experienced. I had arrowed my first buck and I was hooked! After shooting that buck, I felt a sense of relief and sheer excitement all wrapped up together in a ball of emotions. Relief due to the sense that all the practice and preparation finally had cumulated into the desired result. My arrow flew true and found its mark. Buck fever had been replaced by a calming feeling just before the shot, and the instant flow of adrenaline as I realized what I had just done, had found its appropriate time to flow through my veins … directly after the kill shot.

First Bow Kill

First Bow Kill

When I first took up bowhunting, I often dreamt about and wondered what I would shoot first with my bow. That question has now been answered for me, and I’m proud to say it was a whitetail.

What about you? What was your first bow kill? Do you still vividly remember the details of that hunt? If it is starting to fade, I would encourage you to take a moment to write it down. You’d be amazed at how that moment in time comes flooding back when you start journaling it out.

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.
 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson on off season fitness


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

Emily starts her off season fitness

Emily starts her off season fitness

January is a month that is readily filled with commitments for the New Year, and on the top of many resolution lists you are most likely to find something related to fitness. My encouragement this time around … resolve to ditch the yearly fitness resolution, and instead make it a habit to simply live healthy which is a daily commitment. January then simply becomes the reminder to do a heart check each year and make sure you are still on track.

PSE's Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson

Going into the office before dark and watching the sun go down on the drive home in the evenings has me longing for warmer days and each year about this time the lack of Vitamin D seems to get to me. I find myself scouring the web for upcoming races and summertime events that provide a deadline or goal to train for. Sure, the ultimate goal is to be as healthy and fit as possible for when opening day rolls around toward the end of the summer, but I’ve found that having a competition type event helps to provide a little extra motivation. Simply put … if you’ve paid for a race or event, you can bet that crossing that finish line, whether it is by way of a run, walk or crawl, will become a priority.

Running Gear

Running Gear

Most events for the upcoming year are actively being posted on websites, and registrations will be opening soon. Don’t wait too long before making the commitment for a summer race / event. Now is the time to start training! Grab your shoes or hiking boots, throw some extra traction on your soles and hit the trails. It won’t be long before the days will begin to lengthen, and you won’t be sorry that you kicked up your training during the winter months so that you are ready to take your training to the next level when the weather turns warm. In addition the extra Vitamin D may help to get you out of the January blues that often come hand in hand with the ending of many hunting seasons. What are you waiting for? Get out there and create some tracks in the snow covered trails!

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.
 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Your Opinion Matters by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

PSE's Emily Anderson Campfire

PSE’s Emily Anderson Campfire

Has this ever happened to you? Sitting around the campfire the evening before the morning hunt, several hunters discuss the plan for the morning and one is strangely quiet. Maybe the “one” is new in the group; or maybe the “one” is the token girl…

The question hangs in the air…. does their opinion matter?

Okay, guys, you’ve invited your spouse, girlfriend or daughter into your hunting camp. They’ve now entered your world of hunting and all that comes with it. They no longer question the reason for all the excitement when hunting season comes around. The girls not only understand the hunting fever and all that comes with it, they now join in the fun at every opportunity. You have won over the other side and together you are now counting down the days until you can do it all again each season. Bows, Camouflage, Arrows, Range Finders, Tree Stands, Backpacks. They all come in pairs, and your designated hunting closet space just shrunk – as evidenced by heels replaced by hiking boots.

But here are some questions for you… Do you value their hunting opinion? Do the girls in your world have a say in the planning? Do they get to voice their opinion when discussing the next hunting tactic?

Guys, hear me out. I know you may be cringing a little at this point. You have been hunting a long time and we (ladies) may be presenting some bizarre ideas. However, here is your challenge… Don’t roll your eyes, discredit or discourage us from our attempt to join the conversation and offer our hunting opinion, because in doing so, you may not realize you are squashing the new gal’s attempt to simply join in. I now understand how challenging this may be, because when I started hunting I honestly didn’t know what I was talking about at times, e.g., not considering weather, thermals, hunting pressure, etc. However, my challenge to you guys is to gently explain to the newbie WHY we may be wrong. Don’t extinguish the spark! And who knows? Maybe that crazy idea will shake things up and it is just the out of the box idea that works!

On the flip side, Ladies, you need to consider a few things before just jumping in and flapping your jaw (I’m speaking from experience here). May I be a little vulnerable? At times, I remember being a bit frustrated during my first years of hunting. I wanted to not only join the conversation; I at least wanted my opinion to be valued. I’m not pointing fingers in any way here, I’m simply saying that as a girl it is easy to let your emotions / feelings rule the day and forget to balance it out with reason. So here are some tips to think about before speaking…

Camp

Camp

1. Experience – Remember that if you are new to hunting; the friends that have invited you into their camp have more experience than you. The simple fact is experience speaks volumes and demands respect. Yes, you want your opinion to be valued, but it is usually experience that is going to win the day. Don’t forget that and instead of turning a deaf ear, it would behoove you to listen to the wisdom from experienced hunters. They have already experienced the thrill of a close encounter, learned lessons during long stalks, or may even think like the animal being hunted… anticipating their next move.

2. Time – Consider the amount of time the group of hunters you are now hunting with have spent together in the woods. They may have hunted the same unit multiple years together, maybe decades. It takes time to become part of the group and develop your own hunting stories. Cherish the opportunity that you are now part of the group, but honor the memory of past hunts you were not a part of. Let them share the stories, and glean valuable information shared from previous hunts.

Outdoors

Outdoors

3. Territory – Respect the fact they trust you with keeping a secret. Most hunters have a favorite hunting spot which is not even whispered about to a close relative or good friend. It is the honey hole on public land that hasn’t been overtaken yet by the masses. Or even private land acquired through hard work in order to be given permission to hunt. These are the places hunters only tell certain friends about – and if you are one of the privileged ones, respect that!

After considering these things, be thankful you are now part of the team and then jump into the conversation. Your opinion does matter!

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson’s Elk Chorizo Pizza


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

This is the time of year we are all dreaming up new recipes for using all the game meat safely tucked away in our freezers, at least I know that I am. Hopefully, a tag has been filled by someone in your household and you also have the “problem” of overabundance of meat that’s just waiting to be made into some delicious entree. If that is the case, then I have a great idea for dinner tonight!

ELK CHORIZO PIZZA
I made this the other night and it was Oh-My-Goodness Good! My taste buds are salivating just thinking about it. Here is the recipe…

Pizza Dough

Pizza Dough

1. Prepare Crust: Defrost one loaf of frozen bread dough. Cut it in half and set one aside. Generously flour the surface of a clean counter top. Roll dough to the desired thickness for your crust. (You can also take advantage of any pizza tossing skills you have.. even if you don’t, it could prove to be fun. Just don’t let the dough fall on the ground!) Place your crust on a round cookie sheet or pizza stone.

Browning meat

Browning meat

2. Brown Meat: Cook your elk chorizo on med-low heat until thoroughly browned. You could also use any type of elk / venison breakfast sausage. I prefer elk chorizo because it has a little more kick!
3. Add Toppings: Spread a thin layer of pizza sauce. Sprinkle mozzarella cheese evenly over sauce. Add elk chorizo and any additional desired toppings.

Toppings!

Toppings!

4. Bake: Slide your pizza into a pre-heated 375 degree oven for about 15-20 minutes until the crust is nicely browned and toppings are cooked. While this one is baking, use the second half of the bread dough and prepare Pizza #2. Enjoy!

Finished Pizza

Finished Pizza

P.s. I have to warn you that it is easy to get distracted while making this pizza because you will be focused on the end result of mouthwatering goodness. If you take off your wedding ring to prepare this pizza, it is a good idea to make sure it is safely stored in a jewelry box or other secure location. I made a VERY expensive pizza the other night when I realized my ring was swept into the garbage. Maybe Santa will bring me an elk wedding ring for Christmas…

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson is Planning For Next Season


Places to hunt

Places to hunt

It’s that time of year again. Deer season is coming to a close for most areas of the country. Accolades have been echoed across social media circles to those who have punched their tag. Proud pictures of smiling hunters next to their deer in the field have been posted everywhere possible online. You would think that hunters across the country would be relieved that the season is over; there is time to now sit back, enjoy a big juicy venison steak dinner and relax for the next several months. But to be honest, I know that is not the case. At least not for me. Yes, I’m eating a steak dinner, but I’m dreaming about the next season while savoring each bite… And so the planning begins. By the end of December or mid-January, I’m already thinking about opening day 2013. Non-hunters may not understand that the beginning of a new calendar year simply begins the count down for when we can do it all again. The end of one season simply marks the beginning of preparation for the next. And if you’re like me, there are several things that need to be weighed during this process.

So, sit back, grab a piece of freshly dried venison jerky and let’s consider together the WHERE, WHEN and WHO for next season hunts. Some of these overlap a bit, but that is because each decision factors into the other in some capacity… First on the list… WHERE to hunt next year. How do you decide where your hunting adventures for the upcoming year will occur? The two biggest things I personally consider each year when considering where I’ll be hunting are my budget, and my bucket-list. Here is a breakdown of what that looks like:

• BUDGET – My budget for the next year is first up for consideration. I know it sounds simple, because if you don’t have the funds for a tag, then you simply don’t have the funds. However, there are sometimes some options here. My husband and I budget throughout the year to be able to apply for and/or buy our tags for the next year. However, not all of your tags need to be bought at the same time. If you plan and do your research, you can lay out good plan of which tags will need to be paid for ahead of time (draw), and which can be bought as over-the-counter. This helps to ultimately spread out the cost over several months. If you are applying for out-of-state tags, that is where the punch to the wallet will occur. However, there are some options here also. Most of the time you can use a credit card to apply for the tag and the cost of the tag will usually only hit your card if you draw the tag. Of course, the best option is to have the funds ahead of time, but using a credit card is a great way to build points if you know that you won’t actually draw the tag for a few years.
• BUCKET LIST – Each year, I consider the big hunts that I want to do someday, and make an effort to be one-step closer to making it happen. Does it mean applying for a tag to build preference points? Does it mean that I simply need to buckle down and start saving more towards my goal? Either way, if you make an effort to be one-step closer to your goal, the likelihood of crossing that dream hunt off your bucket list has a better chance of becoming a reality. Plan for it.
Next up on the list… WHEN will I be hunting next year. This depends on the tag that is drawn. Along with that, there are couple factors to consider when planning the WHEN of your hunt:

Hunting Plans

Hunting Plans

• TIME – This isn’t as much of an issue for some as others. For example, I am fortunate to have several weeks of vacation that I can devote to hunting each year, but that also means that I need to be disciplined and not use it up during the summertime months which is sometimes very tempting! My husband is blessed even more and is able to take off several months…one for elk season and one for whitetail. Depending on how much time you have factors in to how many tags you’ll be able to buy. For example, I consider whether I will be able to spend the time needed if I draw that once-in-a lifetime moose tag this year, or would it be smarter to just put in for preference points instead? As a hunter, I’ve found that it is important to budget my vacation time well in advance so that by the time season opener rolls around, I’m not stuck with an expensive tag in my pocket and no time to hunt.
• SEASON LENGTH – After you’ve established how much time you have, then think about exactly when during each season you’ll be hunting based on the length of the season. Some tags are only valid for a week timeframe, so that is usually a no-brainer. However, for archery elk or whitetail, the season typically last for a month or several months. Therefore, how do you decided exactly when to hunt? I’m not going to list all the pros and cons of early versus late season here or even tell you which is better since there are many personal preferences in this area. Rather, I’ll just point out there are many things to think about when considering your season length and which dates you will focus on hunting: timing of the rut, moon phases, hunting pressure, overlap of other seasons, weather, etc.

PSE's Emily Anderson's Base Camp

PSE’s Emily Anderson’s Base Camp

Finally, Troy and I review WHO we will be hunting with during the upcoming year.
• LOCATION – A huge factor in determining where you will be hunting is figuring out who you will be hunting with. You almost need to consider this first before anything else. Some questions to think about… Will you be hunting with someone new? Do you trust them with your secret hunting hole? Do they match your physical ability? Are they prepared for a backcountry hunt both physically and mentally? If hunting with a regular hunting friend, are you on the same page on where you will be hunting? Discussing this way ahead of the game is key to a successful hunt.
• BASE CAMP – It is never too early to begin thinking about camping arrangements. If you are hunting with a big group, then start planning for a location that has plenty of room and easy access for everyone. If hunting in a smaller group or solo hunting, now is the time to begin going through your gear, doing inventory for next year, and budgeting for the necessary gear you want to add to your pack for the next mountain adventure.
That is my high-level planning list. Let me know what you think! Remember, it’s never too early to plan your next hunt. Good luck in the upcoming year. Happy planning and hunting!

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.
 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Whitetail Passion by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Midwest Hunt

Hunting whitetails is relatively new to me. My first opportunity to hunt whitetail in the Midwest was last year in 2011. I was thrilled to be able to shoot my first buck ever and came home with a nice little 8 point buck.

Since punching that first archery tag, I can officially say that I have caught the whitetail bug. I now understand the passion for hunting these deer that wander the farmlands, fields and woods in the Midwest. I was skeptical at first since I got my feet wet in the hunting world by learning to hunt in the mountains of Colorado. I was certain that I would be utterly board sitting in a tree stand just waiting for something to walk within bow range. Oh how I was wrong! I am now dreaming and scheming of how to obtain more opportunities to arrow bigger and better deer than I have previously.

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Climbing High

There is just something about climbing high up into a tree, knowing that your stand overlooks a field or trail where a scrape has just been visited below. You have a great vantage point for watching the sun creep up over the horizon. You are there before the birds start singing. As the world slowly awakens before you, the soft sweet sound of crunch crunch below signals that a deer is making their way through the woods. There is no stopping it, before even knowing if the sound is produced by a squirrel, doe or shooter buck, the adrenaline begins to pump through your veins.

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson

The memory is still fresh from the other weekend when I had the opportunity to arrow my second whitetail. The adrenaline has now worked its way through my body, but the recollection is still vivid. As the evening light began to fade and the minutes were counting down to the last shooting opportunity, a buck on the horizon made an appearance. He was a couple hundred yards off and following the scent-line that we had laid down earlier. As my husband, Troy, let out a few grunts and then a rattle sequence, the buck began to close the distance fast. I reached for my bow, releasing it from the tree hook, and prepared to draw back.

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Whitetail

As I mentally prepared for the shot, I picked a spot in the landscape where I would draw back if he crossed the line. The buck reached the designated stump and the strings on my PSE EVO were stretched. I now had a view through my peep sight which somehow calmed the previous shaking in my body. It was a rhythm I was used to from all the previous practice. The buck halted to a stop at the sound of one last grunt call. It was all I needed to pick a spot and settle my pin. Thwack! In an instant the broadhead did its job. We watched as the buck sped towards the ditch and never came out. He was piled up at the bottom, and I am proud to be able to say I shot him with my PSE!

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson is Hunting with her husband


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

Emily Anderson

The Andersons

Okay, Ladies, I’ve mentioned it before that I hunt with my husband. While I am so thankful that we share a hobby, there are definitely pros and cons of having the same bowhunting addiction. I thought it would be fun to put together a brief list of pros and cons. Here is what I came up with…

PROS of hunting with your husband:

1. Spending quality time together in the woods. The sport of hunting has allowed Troy and I to spend countless hours together hiking around in the woods. We’ve been able to share so many memories simply because we have this common interest.
2. Opportunity for communication. Seriously. We’ve had some great conversations related to hunting… planning upcoming trips, ethics of hunting, and simply reminiscing on previous hunts
3. Meat! With two hunters in your household, the potential for never having to buy store bought meat just doubled.
4. Competition. Who doesn’t like a little friendly competition with their spouse? I know I do. There’s always the question of who is going to fill their tag first, or even whose animal tastes better.

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Hunting with her Husband

CONS of hunting with your husband:

1. Double punch to the wallet. Your husband’s hobby just became twice as expensive! Say “hello” to two sets of range finders, arrows, camouflage clothes, bows, etc. The list is never ending.
2. Unwanted Coaching. My husband will admit this one. He is pretty tough on me, but I know his intentions are good. When I first started shooting, he critiqued me pretty hard. My form, anchor point, stance, etc., were all subject to review. Honestly, Ladies, I would suggest having a friend or someone at the local archery shop give you pointers when you first start out. I had to and from time-to-time still find myself getting a second opinion from someone other than my husband.
3. Disagreements. There may be times where you have different opinions on where to hunt, or even how often. Communication is key!
4. Vacation Drain. Be prepared to spend all of your vacation time on hunting trips. While I don’t think this necessarily a bad thing, be forewarned that you may start finding yourself investigating what you can hunt even on vacations to tropical locations!

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.
 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson Prepares Hunting Camp Meals


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

PSE's Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson

In my last post, I talked about preparing your body and gear prior to a hunt. In this post I’d like to talk a little bit about food. Who doesn’t like to talk about food, right?One of the last things I do prior to a hunt is prepare all the food for the trip. I like to do as much food prep ahead of time which makes meal time upon returning to base camp after a hunt easy. I don’t want to be fussing with putting something together after I’ve come back from a long hike, it’s dark and I’m tired. Therefore, I do a lot of thinking and planning ahead of time to make sure that my meals are ready to go and all I need to do is heat them up. I usually prepare them a couple days prior to our hunt and then freeze them solid so they are good to pull out of the cooler whenever we want a meal during our hunting week. (Hint: Use a disposable casserole pan so there are no dishes to be done either)

Here are some meal ideas that I return to year after year because they are non-fuss, plus my hunting friends threaten to harm me if I don’t show up at camp with…

ELK LASAGNA
Cook lasagna noodles (el dente)
Prepare sauce – brown 1 lb. ground meat (elk or whatever game meat is in your freezer). Sauté in with the meat, two minced cloves of garlic. Add one can tomato sauce and one can diced tomatoes. Add 1-2 tablespoons of oregano or Italian seasoning. Cover and let simmer for 20 minutes.
Build lasagna – butter the bottom of the pan, and then layer with noodles, then mozzarella cheese, cottage cheese, meat sauce and parmesan cheese. Continue with layers, ending with meat and parmesan cheese until pan is full. Cover with tin foil and freeze.

CHICKEN ENCHILADAS
Cook several chicken breasts, shred and mix in taco seasoning. Prepare a box or two of Spanish rice. Butter the bottom of a 9×13 disposable pan. Build enchiladas with the following ingredients… Black beans, taco chicken, cheese, rice, Pico de Gallo sauce. Roll each enchilada tightly. (I usually fit 6-8 in a pan depending on how big I make them). Cover the top of the enchiladas with a can of cream of chicken soup (Helps to keep them from drying out), and a layer of shredded cheese. Cover and freeze.

PSE's Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Camp Fire

Both of these meals can be heated up either on a grill or oven in a camper (if you have one).

I have lots more hunting meal ideas, so stay tuned for future posts!

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson Hunting Alone


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Hunting Alone

Once and a while the question comes up as to whether or not I hunt alone. The short answer is usually, “no.” Mostly I hunt with my husband. Although, there have been a few times where I have ventured out on my own. These hunts have taken place in familiar areas, where cell service signals are not rare, and with my sidearm securely attached to my belt.

Ladies, if you are pondering the question of whether or not to hunt alone, there are few things you should consider…

The first thing to think about is the type of hunt you are preparing for, and the second factor is the location of your hunt. The type of hunting you prefer, e.g., tree-stand, blind, or spot and stalk, most likely will play a factor into whether or not as a female hunter you feel comfortable with solo hunting. The location in my opinion is a bigger factor. For example, I would not want to venture off on a 10 day back country wilderness hunt by myself. I think I could keep myself from getting lost since I’m usually not directionally challenged; however, I wouldn’t trust myself enough to stay safe. It would also not be an easy task getting the meat out. I am up for a lot of things, but not that type of challenge. I know there are options like drop camps and packing a satellite phone to call your coordinates in for someone to come pack out the meat, but it is still not something that interests me… at least doing it by myself. On the other hand, if I’m hunting deer and had a tree-stand hung and ready to go, I would have no qualms about sitting solo waiting for a white-tailed deer to walk by.

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson’s Hunt

In addition to the type and location of your hunt, here are a few other thoughts to consider prior to venturing off into the woods by yourself…

1. Do you have means to take care of the meat? Make sure you are prepared to gut your animal, or at least have a very good plan for getting a hold of someone quickly that can help. Is there cell service in your area? Remember, the meat is the trophy!

2. Since you are most likely either entering or leaving your hunting area in the dark, be aware of your surroundings. Even though you are armed with a bow, there is still potential for a bad situation to occur, e.g, other individuals with ill intentions, or even other predators in the woods. Be prepared!

3. Lastly, something that a lot of hunters don’t consider is the loneliness factor. This shouldn’t be a problem if you are doing a quick day trip, but if you are planning on spending several days by yourself in the wilderness, be prepared to start talking to yourself. Seriously. It is something that a lot of hunters may not admit, but being by yourself in the woods is not something easy to do. I’ve recently heard several hunters, who have experience in the back country, admit to this. Be prepared to deal with the loneliness factor, e.g., bring a journal or good book to help pass the hours.

PSE's Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson

The urge to venture off into the woods and tag an animal by myself frequently tries to convince me I should. The romance of it all temps me. My “I can do it” attitude threatens to override my common sense, but this urge is quickly replaced by reality and I’m brought back quickly to my senses. In my opinion, hunting with a friend or spouse somehow increases the joy in the hunt. When someone fills a tag, there are friends for high-fiving and helping with the skin, gut and pack out job. Everyone pitches in to take care of the meat. Usually, my part of the team-work is in loading an animal on pack frames and carrying it off the mountain (after the skinning and gutting). It is the part of the process I enjoy the most. The burn in your legs and lungs somehow doesn’t matter or slow me down. The momentary pain can’t stop the smile from creeping over my face due to the knowledge of all the future meals that are loaded on my pack frame. The thought of backstraps and tenderloins is all the motivation I need to take that next step.

Yes, I think I’ll continue to hunt with family and friends… it makes the experience more enjoyable! What about you? Do you prefer solo hunts or group hunts? Why?

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson Preparing For Your Hunt


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com

PSE's Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson on a Hunt

Prior to a hunt, there is always plenty of planning to do. While some are managing land, planting food plots and setting up tree stands, my hunts typically take place on public land in the mountains. Therefore, I can’t speak towards the former type of hunt preparation. However, I can tell you about the latter and how we plan for our hunts out west.

In my opinion, the first thing to do if planning a hunt in the mountains is to make sure you are physically prepared. While I don’t think it is absolutely necessary to be able to run marathons, but anything you do to increase your lung capacity and strength will definitely help, especially if you are not used to the altitude. Plus, ladies, it is always fun to be able to out hike the guys!

PSE's Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Hunting Necessities

Second, make sure that you have all the gear needed. Start making lists! If you are planning a backcountry hunt where you pack in all your gear on your back or on horses, it is extremely important to make sure you have all you need. And then, pack your backpack ahead of time. However, if you are bringing a camper that changes things a bit. When hunting elk, we typically bring everything including the kitchen sink if we our hunting out of a camper… including the grill, which makes it nice for grilling fresh backstraps! I still carry around a backpack each day, even though we have camper for sleeping in each night. This allows us to easily stay out all day if necessary.

Here is a breakdown of what is included in my pack on elk hunts. I don’t think there is much difference for girls and guys in what is included, but you be the judge…

Backpack contents for day trips (usually elk hunting):
1. Heat packs
2. Snacks
3. Elk pee (scent wafers) & safety pin to hang on a tree
4. Extra layer of clothes – usually long johns and extra t-shirt for pack out trips
5. Matches
6. Game bag
7. Green cat eyes for walking out in the dark
8. Water
9. Toilet paper
10. Hunting license
11. Camera
NOTE: Since I wear cargo pants, a lot of my other supplies are safely tucked in all the pockets, which also makes things easy when getting ready for an early morning hunt. (Pockets contain: chapstick, range finder, elk calls, wind check and gloves)

Of course, there are a few obvious things missing, but they are safely tucked in my husband’s pack… knives, rope and gps

So…. do you have any special ritual or planning you do in advance of a hunt?

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


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