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Women in the World of Bow Hunting by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson

A general internet search or call to your local Division of Wildlife will easily reveal the fact that women entering the hunting community continues to grow each year. They now contribute millions of dollars each year toward wildlife and habitat programs through hunting license fees, taxes on bows, guns, etc., and donations to non-profit hunting organizations.

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With more women entering the hunting world, the idea of women toting around a gun or bow into the woods is becoming less and less of an anomaly. While this is good for the sport of hunting it may be cause for dismay for some women trying to stand out and make a name for themselves solely based on the fact that they are of the female gender and they hunt.

I will admit that I still enjoy the reaction on people’s faces when they find out I enjoy donning camouflage and venturing off into the woods with bow in hand. However, this reaction is becoming more of a rarity and quite honestly I’m okay with that. It simply means that women in the hunting industry is now more of a commonality, and if I’ve played a small part in making that a reality, it encourages my heart.

Gals, being recognized as part of the “hunting fraternity”, if you will, should not be taken lightly. We’ve proven that we are capable, willing to shoot, kill, clean and carry our quarry back to camp. We are all on the same playing field. There is no grading on a curve, or advantage points when hunting. When the arrow is released from the bow, it doesn’t matter whether or not the hand holding it has perfectly manicured fingernails. (Granted perfectly manicured fingernails may look nice in the photo while holding that 6×6 bull elk.) The bottom line is that the animals don’t know the difference, Simply because we are a different gender shouldn’t give us the right to boast about a kill more than the guys.

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I guess what I’m trying to say is that while the female hunter has been encouraged, highly marketed to, and maybe even stood out as having an advantage in the hunting industry simply because she is a thing of rarity, the shine may be lessening. The playing field is beginning to level, and I don’t necessarily think that is a bad thing. It is quite the contrary. The commonness of the women hunter means more opportunity to champion hunting in a positive light.

What do you think about the increase of females becoming involved in hunting? How has it benefited the hunting community? Do you feel women have had an advantage in some areas? If yes, how do you feel about that? Is it okay as long as it encourages more women to get involved? Sound off…

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Quick Tips for Tent Location in the Mountains by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson

http://www.fromthedraw.com/

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Choosing the correct spot to pitch your tent may seem like an easy task, but there are several things you should consider to get the best rest possible out in the field.  I know from experience that after climbing above timberline, finding that perfect spot for a tent can quickly become a tiresome task.  However, it is worth the effort to pick your spot wisely. If you settle for the wrong piece of ground, you may end up tossing and turning all night, which will in turn affect your performance in the following day’s hunt.

Here are some quick tips when looking for the perfect tent location:

  1. LOCATE FLAT GROUND:  This may seem obvious; however, this simple task can sometimes be extremely difficult on the side of a mountain.  If you are on a slope, even the slightest degree, you will find yourself fighting gravity all night long and will most likely end up rolled up on one side of your tent.  A word of advice: Make sure your tent is anchored down!  You will also want to angle your tent strategically.  In my opinion, it is better to have your tent parallel to the hill with top part slightly angled up.  That way you will ensure that all the blood doesn’t rush toward your head, and you don’t wake up with a massive headache.IMG_0125
  2. CONSIDER THE TYPE OF GROUND:  A ground cushioned with a layer of forest duff is much more comfortable than rocky ground that is usually found just above timberline.  If you are at a high altitude, consider looking for an area just where timberline breaks where pine trees may provide some softer ground cover.  Depending on where you are at, there may also be grassy saddles where the top of the mountain seems to roll over to the other side.  Often they will produce flat, areas to pitch a tent.  However, the velvet-like appearance of the grass covered hill may be a little deceiving.  It is usually very rocky ground under all that grass.
  3. BE AWARE OF THE WEATHER:  Yes, you read that correctly.  You should consider the weather when pitching your sleeping spot.  If you are fortunate to find an open, flat, non-rocky section of land, keep in mind that if this prime real-estate exists in the wide open on the top of a mountain, you may be in for a surprise if a thunderstorm rolls through.  The wind can get ferocious as it whips across the top of a mountain.  For this reason, if you aren’t sure what type of weather is expected that evening, it might be better to opt for a slightly less ideal camping location if it provides some protection from the weather.  Of course, I wouldn’t suggest pitching your tent under the tallest tree on the mountain either due to the very real danger of lighting.
  4. PICK YOUR SPOT STRATEGICALLY:  Consider where you will be hunting the next morning.  Pick your tent location so that you can easily slip into the best location at first light.  Pay attention to game trails in the area.  E.g., make sure your not camping right on top of a well traveled path.  Locate where you think the animals you are hunting will likely be feeding in the morning.  Will you be able to glass the area without being seen?  Are you out of the way enough?  How long will it take you to get to where you need to be that next morning?

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That’s my quick list of tips for finding the perfect spot to pitch a tent.  Hopefully you will find one of these tips helpful when the time comes for finding a spot to sleep in the great outdoors!

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Nacho Venison Bean Bake by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson

http://www.fromthedraw.com/

The venison in my freezer is slowly dwindling down, but there are still plenty of packages to get me through a couple more months.  With each package subtracted from my freezer supply, I am mentally calculating how much longer it will last.

With my stock rapidly becoming depleted, I found myself eyeballing a poor deer that was laying near a fence line as I was on my way to work the other morning.  It was an odd location for a deer to decide to settle in for it’s afternoon nap.  I was confident that another commuter into town probably collided with the deer earlier that morning.  The doe or perhaps recently antler-less buck caught my eye as my car speed by, and as our eyeballs met, my caffeine depraved state of mind and work commitment kept me pushing on towards town as I fought the temptation to turn my car around.  I quickly phoned my husband to see when he would be making his way back through the woods.  I asked him to check on the deer and if he was still laying there, to call the Division of Wildlife to see if a roadkill tag could be issued … depending on the condition of the deer.   It would be a win-win.  The deer would be put out of it’s misery, and the supply of meat in our freezer would be restocked.  However, it wasn’t meant to be.  Someone else either put the deer down or it recovered enough to meander back into the woods.

Each state is different in their rules / regulations on whether roadkill tags are issued.  If you are up to it, I would encourage you to find out what the rules where you live.  I know that in Colorado there are opportunities to acquire a tag if the opportunity is right.  We’ve put down an elk a couple years ago on the side of the road after it got tangled with a truck and fence line.  After receiving permission from the Division of Wildlife, we were issued a roadkill tag and put him out of his misery.  Honestly, that was the best tasting elk we’ve had!

Whether you have roadkill meat or you are using up venison from last season, here is a tasty recipe that I know your family will love!

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Nacho Venison Bean Bake

Ingredients:

*  1 pound ground venison

*  1 cup onion

*  1 chopped red pepper

*  1 package taco seasoning

*  1 can tomato sauce

*  1 can diced tomatoes

*  1 can chili beans

*  1 can black beans (drained)

*  1 can whole kernel corn (drained)

*  Nacho chips

*  1-2 cups cheddar cheese

Brown the venison, and add the onion and pepper.  Season with taco seasoning.  Stir in the tomato sauce, beans, and corn.  Cover and simmer.

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Grease a 13 x 9 inch baking pan.  Add a layer of nacho chips on the bottom of the pan.  Spoon a healthy layer of the venison and bean mixture.  Layer with more chips and cheese.  Add remaining venison / bean mixture and finish with a layer of chips and cheese.

350 degrees for 30 min or until bubbly.  Enjoy!

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P.s., IMO this bake is better the second time around.  Heat and spoon over a wedge of lettuce and some sour cream.

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Hunting in a Social World by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson

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I may just be speaking about myself, or perhaps there are others like me out there…  As hunters, we all get excited to get out and jump into the action when opening day rolls around.  We’ve been practicing all year long.  Our bows have been fine tuned – probably multiple times. We are more than ready to pick up our bows and carry them into the woods.

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With the social media world captivating us and offering the opportunity to connect with others who share similar interests, it allows the convenience of sharing the journey along the way.  But it’s more than just that.  You can be guaranteed that the instant a hunt turns into a success story, the excitement is shared on-the-spot.  Cell phones are whipped out directly after high-fives are exchanged, and the images spread like wildfire across social venues online.  In a way it sometimes feels like a race to fill the first tag and post a trophy picture / story.  It seems as if we are all lined up on the starting line of opening day, bows in hands, waiting for the gun of daylight to go off.

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I’ve found that the early season mixed with the social world becomes an avenue for the envious hunter to emerge within myself.  I can’t help it … the little jealous hunter wants to get out at times and I have to make a concerted effort to kill this little monster.  Please don’t get me wrong – I love it when I get to see a picture of my fellow hunting friends who just moments ago tagged that monster buck, bull of a lifetime or long-beard.  However, if I’m totally honest, I want to post the next picture.  I want to jump in the social frenzy and join the party!

Combating the envious hunter within me is sometimes quite the challenge, but I’m going to let you in on a secret.  I’ve found that striping off the jealous layers and simply joining in the celebration of other hunters with a sincere ‘congratulations’ takes the focus off yourself.  Guess what?  You have in a way just joined the party.

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So, I’ve decided that using the opportunity to share in other’s success is way more fun than dwelling on the fact I haven’t filled a tag yet.  I guess it’s all a matter of perspective.  You can be guaranteed that I’ll be joining your celebration party online, until I have the opportunity to shoot my next buck or arrow my first turkey.  Then I hope you’ll celebrate along with me.  Oh and one more thing … if we are ever hunting together, I may even photo bomb your trophy pic, because come on – that would just be fun!

I want to hear from you:

Am I alone in this? How do you combat your envious hunter within?

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Consistent Practice by PSE’s Dustin Jones


By Dustin Jones

http://www.highcountrybowhunter.com/

Here in Idaho it gets more and more difficult to practice during the winter months due to the snow and the cold. I practice outside so when it starts getting snowy and cold it makes it harder to get out and shoot. Sure there are a few places around that have indoor shooting areas but the longest shot is about 25 yards and I have to pay. While this is great for practice sake, I like to shoot longer distances to make the shorter ones easier and I like to shoot for free. But all in all it is best to practice between the seasons.

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Consistency is what every bowhunter wants to achieve. Many people think that it is just simple to pick up a bow and shoot bull’s eye after bull’s eye. While there are some that can do this; I for one need constant practice. I don’t consider myself a professional by no means so there is always room for improvement.

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One of the most common ways to improve your accuracy is eliminating your bow toque. As you are shooting and you notice your arrows are consistent up and down but off left and right, you are experiencing some bow torque. The main reason that causes bow torque is your grip and PSE’s Emily Anderson wrote a great article on Loosening Your Grip.

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I actually have been trying to focus on this as well for my own form. I did find a useful tool that actually helps you attain the proper grip. I used the True Shot Coach and it helped tighten my groups. Like I mentioned I don’t consider myself to be a professional but I felt confident in shooting my bow. I did notice that I had the occasional stray arrow that would be off to the left or right. This meant that I had some bow torque that I needed to correct and this actually helped.

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The key is to practice and strive to find ways to improve. I am out there as often as I can, hauling my target out through the snow and braving the freezing temperatures just to get a few rounds in when I can. So make sure you get out and keep practicing because the 2013 season is slowly approaching!

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Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.

Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

 

 


Deer Wrapped in a Blanket by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson

http://www.fromthedraw.com/

While the wind taunted snowflakes all around outside today, covering the ground in furled blankets of snow, it was a different story inside my house.  A wonderful smell waffled from my oven.  The battle raged outside, as snow attempted to pile along the fence line, only to be whipped up again in the blizzard’s breath, seemingly begging to come inside and melt away with each beating against my windows.  The beast laughed as it played with the snow, watching each snowflake eventually succumb to the fury of the wind, and I smiled as I had no reason to leave the house today.  Venison was being neatly tucked in blankets of ham, rows of venison wrapped ham rolls prepared to bake in the oven and make mouths water.

Not long after the smell of venison ham blanket mixture began to waffle from the oven, my husband wandered into the kitchen.  “What is that great smell?” He asked.

I thought I’d share this great recipe so you too can make mouths water, and lure family members in around the dinner table.  They are also great to prepare ahead of time, and bring along camping!  Just freeze individually to set each ham roll, then place in a large freezer storage bag.  Thaw, top with glaze and cook slowly on a grill or wrap in tin foil over a fire.

Deer Wrapped in a Blanket

Deer Wrapped in a Blanket

Here’s my twist on Pig’s in a Blanket – venison style!

Venison Wrapped Ham Rolls – AKA “Deer Wrapped in a Blanket”

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 pounds ground venison
  • 1 cup evaporated milk
  • 1/2 cup crumpled whole wheat bread
  • 1/3 cup chopped onions
  • 1 tsp salt
  • Dash of pepper
  • Sliced ham 1/8 inch thickness*
  • Whole cloves

Mix the first 6 ingredients together in a large bowl, and place several spoonfuls on each piece of ham.  Be careful to not overstuff!  Fold the ham over the venison mixture and trim securely with cloves.  Place in a shallow pan and top with glaze.

Mix the first 6 ingredients together in a large bowl.

Mix the first 6 ingredients together in a large bowl.

*Hint: Have your ham freshly sliced at the deli counter, and request the slicer to be set at 2 1/2 thickness.

Glaze:

  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 3 Tbs melted butter
  • 1 tsp prepared mustard

To prepare glaze, mix the above ingredients over medium heat until butter is melted and a thick mixture forms.  Spoon the desired amount over each venison ham roll, reserving some to baste at the end.

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Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes.  Remove cloves and enjoy!

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Hunting Close to Home by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson

http://www.fromthedraw.com/

Hunting on land close to home is advantageous for many reasons.  While it may not be as glamorous as planning that back-country trip in the mountains with a nonresident tag in your pocket, it does provide a consistent hunt opportunity year after year.  It often is the backup hunt we can pull out of our pocket when other plans fall through.  Sometimes it is even the hunt holding our attention throughout the year since we may be driving by this land on our many trips to and from the office, taking inventory of animals in our ‘backyard’ honey-hole.

What is interesting to me is that these faithful, routine, or ‘backup’ hunts occurring each year will naturally vary depending on where you live.  It is all a matter of perspective. One hunt someone consistently goes on year after year because it is a residential tag and a matter of convenience, may be considered a hunt of a lifetime for someone else several states away.  E.g., An alligator hunt may be a bucket list hunt for someone living in the North, a whitetail hunt may mean an out of state tag for a Westerner, and then an antelope or a Mule deer hunt may be a big deal for someone on the East Coast.  To some these are dream hunts.  To others where the animals are close to home, they are the hunts relied on year after year.  For me?  It’s antelope. I put in for several tags each year that would trump my antelope tag if I got lucky and drew my first choice, but one thing is for sure… I have an antelope tag in my back pocket. It is the backup plan.

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Once opening day rolls around mid-August, it isn’t uncommon for me to have a spare change of clothes in my car – the kind that blend naturally into the prairie land that antelope call home.  Binoculars ride shotgun in the passenger seat, always within arms reach to take inventory of what is roaming the prairie land.  My husband and I, along with our good friend, Allen, share permission to hunt a couple ranches near home.  My phone often rings as I’m on the way home and I receive a report from my husband or Allen on a buck they saw on a specific section of the ranch.  Conversations usually start out like… “Did you see that one up by the windmill?” or “There’s a bachelor herd over by the back ravine” and “They’ve been making their way to the North water hole late afternoon.”

I can remember a couple summers ago when I was driving home from the office and my phone rang.  My bow was in the back seat and a thought was lingering in the back of my mind on whether I would have time for a quick hunt on the way home.  Maybe one of the guys had an update for me.  When I picked up the phone, I could hear the excitement in his voice and I knew Allen had more than just a regular update.  It was good news!  Buck down.  I immediately turned my truck in the direction of the dirt road that led to the ranch.  There was an antelope on the ground and I had to share in the excitement.

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Paying attention to where the bucks were feeding, watering and grazing all summer long had payed off.  Allen faithfully watched the habits of these bucks and had a feeling that as he eyed the bachelor herd graze over a section of the ranch on his way home one evening, that they would make their way down a ravine and over to the next watering hole.  He decided to go for it.  There was enough time to grab his bow and quickly make his way to the other side of the ravine to a natural blind in the brush. Just as he arrived, the bucks popped up over the ravine and Allen arrowed his biggest antelope yet!

One of the best parts – since it was close to home, we all had the opportunity to share in the excitement.  I’m sure that I forgot to change out of my work clothes and may have even laid down in a cow-pie-laden ground to get just the right picture angle.  It was worth it.

If you are fortunate to have a section of land to hunt near your home, it is worth the effort to pay attention to the movement of the animals.  Take the time to study their habits.  You won’t be sorry when it is time to pull out that faithful ‘backup’ tag in your pocket and chase after that animal you’ve been waiting to hunt all year long.

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


When Biscuits, Gravy and Elk Sausage Collide by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson

http://www.fromthedraw.com/

Biscuits, Gravy and Elk Sausage

Biscuits, Gravy and Elk Sausage

We journey through wooded lands, in pursuit of wild game, traveling along unfamiliar paths, known to only those who call the forest home.  With each step we take, we neatly tuck memories in our packs, a keepsake to carry home.  This memento is enough, as the hunt lives on and dwells in one’s memories, impressed in the hunter’s thoughts for years to come.

For the hunter who carried home more than just memories, the recollection of last season’s hunt comes flooding back with each winter meal.  The smell is mesmerizing.  One taste and you can’t help but smile.  Thankfulness overflows as you acknowledge the strength and nourishment it provides; a healthy meal placed before you.  The hunter is reminded again of the path traveled, and the pursuit’s reward.

Yes, each meal prepared in winter months, reminds us of our journeys from the previous year, and brings new hopes of replacing retrospection with new destinations.  An upcoming adventure that fills the freezer once again!

For those who are fortunate to have wild game in their freezer, dig out some breakfast venison sausage, or sweet Italian elk sausage, and find out what happens when homemade biscuits, gravy and elk sausage collide…

Elk Sausage

Elk Sausage

WHOLE WHEAT BISCUITS

2 cups whole wheat flour

1 cup regular flour

4 1/2 tsp baking powder

2 Tbsp sugar

1/4 tsp salt

3/4 tsp cream of tartar

3/4 cup cold butter

1 egg beaten

1 cup milk

preparing biscuits

preparing biscuits

In a bowl combine the flour, baking powder, sugar, salt and cream of tartar.  Cut in the butter until mixture resembles coarse cornmeal.

Add egg and milk.  Stir quickly and briefly.  Transfer to a lightly floured surface and knead lightly (do not over mix).   Roll or pat gently to 1-inch thickness.  Cut into the desired size biscuits (don’t worry about being perfect – the unique shapes are the best)!

Place on a greased cookie sheet and bake at 450 degrees for 12 – 15 minutes.

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SAUSAGE GRAVY

Prepare a basic white gravy by melting 4 tablespoons of butter over medium heat.  Add several tablespoons of floor (one at a time), mixing well with each addition.  As the mixture thickens to a spreading consistency, slowly add 1 1/2 cups milk.  Whisk to combine the butter / flour mixture in with the milk.  Continue stirring with a spatula over medium heat until gravy thickens.  Season with pepper.

Fry breakfast sausage until browned.  Add to gravy, and heap generously over biscuits fresh from the oven!

Then sit back, and let the recollection of your last hunt flood your memory as the biscuits, sausage and gravy collide and dance over your taste buds.

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Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Loosen your grip by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson

http://www.fromthedraw.com/

When first shooting a bow there is a lot to learn … stand this way, find an anchor point or two or three, back tension, don’t punch the trigger, level, breath, etc.  The list goes on and on.

I remember getting so frustrated with my husband when I was first learning because he wanted me to get everything right.  Now don’t get me wrong, he had my best interests in mind which is admirable.  While I appreciate his concern for my accuracy and desire for excellency, it can also be exasperating when you are trying to remember everything and your spouse is whispering in your ear, “You did it wrong, again.”  I know he was just trying to help, but I felt like he was secretly enjoying pointing out my errors.  Ugh.  I wanted to throw an arrow at him, and since I’m confessing, I think I chased him around with one at some point. Don’t worry, a broadhead was not fixed to the tip of my arrow!

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Gals, if you are just learning to shoot, here’s a piece of advice:  Find a non-biased friend or someone from a local pro-shop to help with your shooting technique.  I’ve found that it is much easier to hear constructive criticism from a non-husband source.

With that being said, after years of shooting a bow, I am still working on perfecting my shot.  I know there is always room for improvement.  Sometimes a minor adjustment here or there can bring you to that next level of consistency in your shot.  Since we are now in a hunting off-season where most deer hunting has come to a close, don’t put your bow away! I would encourage you to take a look at your form.  Is there any room for improvement in your shot?  Video yourself and evaluate your form.  Have someone else give you a second opinion.

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I know what I’ll be working on … how I hold my bow, specifically loosening my grip.  I need to make sure I’m holding it correctly with the bow grip in the meat of my palm, letting my fingers relax, and trusting my bow sling.  After a missed shot this last year, I can almost guarantee it was because I was so excited that I gripped my bow which ended up giving just enough torque to throw my shot off.  So, I know I need some work in this area.  I’ve asked a friend at a Pro-Shop to make sure I’m holding my bow correctly. I know it will take practice… I can consistently shoot 20 yard shots all day long, but I quickly learned the hard way that if I haven’t formed the habit of consistently holding my bow correctly, it is way too easy to grip and torque your shot during the heat of the moment when the shot counts. I have a date with an elk in about 9 months from now, and I’m not going to make the same mistake twice!

What about you?  Are you taking strides this winter to improve your shot?  What areas do you need to improve on?

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


An Archer’s Morning by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson

Blog: http://www.fromthedraw.com/

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Carrying bow in hand and arrows in the other, the archer journeys through the open field.  An established target lays waiting along a well worn path.  The archer doesn’t want to miss the moment.  She makes an appearance briefly each morning, nods and slips away after illuminating the land with glorious stretched out rays.  Each new day is introduced in morning splendor as she swings her lantern of light across the horizon.  She is making her way, evidenced by the surrender of darkness, so the archer quickens his step.  Dawn is drawing near and the archer will be there to greet her.

The rhythm of the draw, aim, and release is mesmerizing, which somehow pauses the spinning of the world as an arrow slices through the crisp clean air.  Fingertips begin to grow numb as Jack Frost makes an appearance, but Dawn’s soft golden rays greets the archer with a kiss simultaneously as the string is anchored to lip’s edge.  The favor is returned as glistening rays dance off the tip of the arrow now slicing through the thin veil of breaking light.  The dance continues.  Anchor.  Breathe.  Aim.  Release.

Morning is now chasing Dawn across the prairie, threatening to snatch up her golden rays as the sun inches higher in the sky.  The brilliant rays of first light has done it’s job and pierced through the archer’s heart.  Dawn’s tranquility has swept by, leaving an archer in an open field thankful for another day.  Through the peep hole of a bow sight, the archer winks and watches as she introduces the day gracefully.  She winks back and slips away with a promise to return to catch the next arrow in flight.

The archer gathers arrows and journeys on, ready to face the day with the promise of Dawn coming again.

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Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


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