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Women in the World of Bow Hunting by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson

A general internet search or call to your local Division of Wildlife will easily reveal the fact that women entering the hunting community continues to grow each year. They now contribute millions of dollars each year toward wildlife and habitat programs through hunting license fees, taxes on bows, guns, etc., and donations to non-profit hunting organizations.

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With more women entering the hunting world, the idea of women toting around a gun or bow into the woods is becoming less and less of an anomaly. While this is good for the sport of hunting it may be cause for dismay for some women trying to stand out and make a name for themselves solely based on the fact that they are of the female gender and they hunt.

I will admit that I still enjoy the reaction on people’s faces when they find out I enjoy donning camouflage and venturing off into the woods with bow in hand. However, this reaction is becoming more of a rarity and quite honestly I’m okay with that. It simply means that women in the hunting industry is now more of a commonality, and if I’ve played a small part in making that a reality, it encourages my heart.

Gals, being recognized as part of the “hunting fraternity”, if you will, should not be taken lightly. We’ve proven that we are capable, willing to shoot, kill, clean and carry our quarry back to camp. We are all on the same playing field. There is no grading on a curve, or advantage points when hunting. When the arrow is released from the bow, it doesn’t matter whether or not the hand holding it has perfectly manicured fingernails. (Granted perfectly manicured fingernails may look nice in the photo while holding that 6×6 bull elk.) The bottom line is that the animals don’t know the difference, Simply because we are a different gender shouldn’t give us the right to boast about a kill more than the guys.

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I guess what I’m trying to say is that while the female hunter has been encouraged, highly marketed to, and maybe even stood out as having an advantage in the hunting industry simply because she is a thing of rarity, the shine may be lessening. The playing field is beginning to level, and I don’t necessarily think that is a bad thing. It is quite the contrary. The commonness of the women hunter means more opportunity to champion hunting in a positive light.

What do you think about the increase of females becoming involved in hunting? How has it benefited the hunting community? Do you feel women have had an advantage in some areas? If yes, how do you feel about that? Is it okay as long as it encourages more women to get involved? Sound off…

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Quick Tips for Tent Location in the Mountains by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson

http://www.fromthedraw.com/

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Choosing the correct spot to pitch your tent may seem like an easy task, but there are several things you should consider to get the best rest possible out in the field.  I know from experience that after climbing above timberline, finding that perfect spot for a tent can quickly become a tiresome task.  However, it is worth the effort to pick your spot wisely. If you settle for the wrong piece of ground, you may end up tossing and turning all night, which will in turn affect your performance in the following day’s hunt.

Here are some quick tips when looking for the perfect tent location:

  1. LOCATE FLAT GROUND:  This may seem obvious; however, this simple task can sometimes be extremely difficult on the side of a mountain.  If you are on a slope, even the slightest degree, you will find yourself fighting gravity all night long and will most likely end up rolled up on one side of your tent.  A word of advice: Make sure your tent is anchored down!  You will also want to angle your tent strategically.  In my opinion, it is better to have your tent parallel to the hill with top part slightly angled up.  That way you will ensure that all the blood doesn’t rush toward your head, and you don’t wake up with a massive headache.IMG_0125
  2. CONSIDER THE TYPE OF GROUND:  A ground cushioned with a layer of forest duff is much more comfortable than rocky ground that is usually found just above timberline.  If you are at a high altitude, consider looking for an area just where timberline breaks where pine trees may provide some softer ground cover.  Depending on where you are at, there may also be grassy saddles where the top of the mountain seems to roll over to the other side.  Often they will produce flat, areas to pitch a tent.  However, the velvet-like appearance of the grass covered hill may be a little deceiving.  It is usually very rocky ground under all that grass.
  3. BE AWARE OF THE WEATHER:  Yes, you read that correctly.  You should consider the weather when pitching your sleeping spot.  If you are fortunate to find an open, flat, non-rocky section of land, keep in mind that if this prime real-estate exists in the wide open on the top of a mountain, you may be in for a surprise if a thunderstorm rolls through.  The wind can get ferocious as it whips across the top of a mountain.  For this reason, if you aren’t sure what type of weather is expected that evening, it might be better to opt for a slightly less ideal camping location if it provides some protection from the weather.  Of course, I wouldn’t suggest pitching your tent under the tallest tree on the mountain either due to the very real danger of lighting.
  4. PICK YOUR SPOT STRATEGICALLY:  Consider where you will be hunting the next morning.  Pick your tent location so that you can easily slip into the best location at first light.  Pay attention to game trails in the area.  E.g., make sure your not camping right on top of a well traveled path.  Locate where you think the animals you are hunting will likely be feeding in the morning.  Will you be able to glass the area without being seen?  Are you out of the way enough?  How long will it take you to get to where you need to be that next morning?

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That’s my quick list of tips for finding the perfect spot to pitch a tent.  Hopefully you will find one of these tips helpful when the time comes for finding a spot to sleep in the great outdoors!

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Nacho Venison Bean Bake by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson

http://www.fromthedraw.com/

The venison in my freezer is slowly dwindling down, but there are still plenty of packages to get me through a couple more months.  With each package subtracted from my freezer supply, I am mentally calculating how much longer it will last.

With my stock rapidly becoming depleted, I found myself eyeballing a poor deer that was laying near a fence line as I was on my way to work the other morning.  It was an odd location for a deer to decide to settle in for it’s afternoon nap.  I was confident that another commuter into town probably collided with the deer earlier that morning.  The doe or perhaps recently antler-less buck caught my eye as my car speed by, and as our eyeballs met, my caffeine depraved state of mind and work commitment kept me pushing on towards town as I fought the temptation to turn my car around.  I quickly phoned my husband to see when he would be making his way back through the woods.  I asked him to check on the deer and if he was still laying there, to call the Division of Wildlife to see if a roadkill tag could be issued … depending on the condition of the deer.   It would be a win-win.  The deer would be put out of it’s misery, and the supply of meat in our freezer would be restocked.  However, it wasn’t meant to be.  Someone else either put the deer down or it recovered enough to meander back into the woods.

Each state is different in their rules / regulations on whether roadkill tags are issued.  If you are up to it, I would encourage you to find out what the rules where you live.  I know that in Colorado there are opportunities to acquire a tag if the opportunity is right.  We’ve put down an elk a couple years ago on the side of the road after it got tangled with a truck and fence line.  After receiving permission from the Division of Wildlife, we were issued a roadkill tag and put him out of his misery.  Honestly, that was the best tasting elk we’ve had!

Whether you have roadkill meat or you are using up venison from last season, here is a tasty recipe that I know your family will love!

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Nacho Venison Bean Bake

Ingredients:

*  1 pound ground venison

*  1 cup onion

*  1 chopped red pepper

*  1 package taco seasoning

*  1 can tomato sauce

*  1 can diced tomatoes

*  1 can chili beans

*  1 can black beans (drained)

*  1 can whole kernel corn (drained)

*  Nacho chips

*  1-2 cups cheddar cheese

Brown the venison, and add the onion and pepper.  Season with taco seasoning.  Stir in the tomato sauce, beans, and corn.  Cover and simmer.

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Grease a 13 x 9 inch baking pan.  Add a layer of nacho chips on the bottom of the pan.  Spoon a healthy layer of the venison and bean mixture.  Layer with more chips and cheese.  Add remaining venison / bean mixture and finish with a layer of chips and cheese.

350 degrees for 30 min or until bubbly.  Enjoy!

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P.s., IMO this bake is better the second time around.  Heat and spoon over a wedge of lettuce and some sour cream.

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Hunting in a Social World by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson

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I may just be speaking about myself, or perhaps there are others like me out there…  As hunters, we all get excited to get out and jump into the action when opening day rolls around.  We’ve been practicing all year long.  Our bows have been fine tuned – probably multiple times. We are more than ready to pick up our bows and carry them into the woods.

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With the social media world captivating us and offering the opportunity to connect with others who share similar interests, it allows the convenience of sharing the journey along the way.  But it’s more than just that.  You can be guaranteed that the instant a hunt turns into a success story, the excitement is shared on-the-spot.  Cell phones are whipped out directly after high-fives are exchanged, and the images spread like wildfire across social venues online.  In a way it sometimes feels like a race to fill the first tag and post a trophy picture / story.  It seems as if we are all lined up on the starting line of opening day, bows in hands, waiting for the gun of daylight to go off.

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I’ve found that the early season mixed with the social world becomes an avenue for the envious hunter to emerge within myself.  I can’t help it … the little jealous hunter wants to get out at times and I have to make a concerted effort to kill this little monster.  Please don’t get me wrong – I love it when I get to see a picture of my fellow hunting friends who just moments ago tagged that monster buck, bull of a lifetime or long-beard.  However, if I’m totally honest, I want to post the next picture.  I want to jump in the social frenzy and join the party!

Combating the envious hunter within me is sometimes quite the challenge, but I’m going to let you in on a secret.  I’ve found that striping off the jealous layers and simply joining in the celebration of other hunters with a sincere ‘congratulations’ takes the focus off yourself.  Guess what?  You have in a way just joined the party.

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So, I’ve decided that using the opportunity to share in other’s success is way more fun than dwelling on the fact I haven’t filled a tag yet.  I guess it’s all a matter of perspective.  You can be guaranteed that I’ll be joining your celebration party online, until I have the opportunity to shoot my next buck or arrow my first turkey.  Then I hope you’ll celebrate along with me.  Oh and one more thing … if we are ever hunting together, I may even photo bomb your trophy pic, because come on – that would just be fun!

I want to hear from you:

Am I alone in this? How do you combat your envious hunter within?

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Consistent Practice by PSE’s Dustin Jones


By Dustin Jones

http://www.highcountrybowhunter.com/

Here in Idaho it gets more and more difficult to practice during the winter months due to the snow and the cold. I practice outside so when it starts getting snowy and cold it makes it harder to get out and shoot. Sure there are a few places around that have indoor shooting areas but the longest shot is about 25 yards and I have to pay. While this is great for practice sake, I like to shoot longer distances to make the shorter ones easier and I like to shoot for free. But all in all it is best to practice between the seasons.

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Consistency is what every bowhunter wants to achieve. Many people think that it is just simple to pick up a bow and shoot bull’s eye after bull’s eye. While there are some that can do this; I for one need constant practice. I don’t consider myself a professional by no means so there is always room for improvement.

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One of the most common ways to improve your accuracy is eliminating your bow toque. As you are shooting and you notice your arrows are consistent up and down but off left and right, you are experiencing some bow torque. The main reason that causes bow torque is your grip and PSE’s Emily Anderson wrote a great article on Loosening Your Grip.

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I actually have been trying to focus on this as well for my own form. I did find a useful tool that actually helps you attain the proper grip. I used the True Shot Coach and it helped tighten my groups. Like I mentioned I don’t consider myself to be a professional but I felt confident in shooting my bow. I did notice that I had the occasional stray arrow that would be off to the left or right. This meant that I had some bow torque that I needed to correct and this actually helped.

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The key is to practice and strive to find ways to improve. I am out there as often as I can, hauling my target out through the snow and braving the freezing temperatures just to get a few rounds in when I can. So make sure you get out and keep practicing because the 2013 season is slowly approaching!

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Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.

Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

 

 


Deer Wrapped in a Blanket by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson

http://www.fromthedraw.com/

While the wind taunted snowflakes all around outside today, covering the ground in furled blankets of snow, it was a different story inside my house.  A wonderful smell waffled from my oven.  The battle raged outside, as snow attempted to pile along the fence line, only to be whipped up again in the blizzard’s breath, seemingly begging to come inside and melt away with each beating against my windows.  The beast laughed as it played with the snow, watching each snowflake eventually succumb to the fury of the wind, and I smiled as I had no reason to leave the house today.  Venison was being neatly tucked in blankets of ham, rows of venison wrapped ham rolls prepared to bake in the oven and make mouths water.

Not long after the smell of venison ham blanket mixture began to waffle from the oven, my husband wandered into the kitchen.  “What is that great smell?” He asked.

I thought I’d share this great recipe so you too can make mouths water, and lure family members in around the dinner table.  They are also great to prepare ahead of time, and bring along camping!  Just freeze individually to set each ham roll, then place in a large freezer storage bag.  Thaw, top with glaze and cook slowly on a grill or wrap in tin foil over a fire.

Deer Wrapped in a Blanket

Deer Wrapped in a Blanket

Here’s my twist on Pig’s in a Blanket – venison style!

Venison Wrapped Ham Rolls – AKA “Deer Wrapped in a Blanket”

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 pounds ground venison
  • 1 cup evaporated milk
  • 1/2 cup crumpled whole wheat bread
  • 1/3 cup chopped onions
  • 1 tsp salt
  • Dash of pepper
  • Sliced ham 1/8 inch thickness*
  • Whole cloves

Mix the first 6 ingredients together in a large bowl, and place several spoonfuls on each piece of ham.  Be careful to not overstuff!  Fold the ham over the venison mixture and trim securely with cloves.  Place in a shallow pan and top with glaze.

Mix the first 6 ingredients together in a large bowl.

Mix the first 6 ingredients together in a large bowl.

*Hint: Have your ham freshly sliced at the deli counter, and request the slicer to be set at 2 1/2 thickness.

Glaze:

  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 3 Tbs melted butter
  • 1 tsp prepared mustard

To prepare glaze, mix the above ingredients over medium heat until butter is melted and a thick mixture forms.  Spoon the desired amount over each venison ham roll, reserving some to baste at the end.

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Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes.  Remove cloves and enjoy!

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Hunting Close to Home by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson

http://www.fromthedraw.com/

Hunting on land close to home is advantageous for many reasons.  While it may not be as glamorous as planning that back-country trip in the mountains with a nonresident tag in your pocket, it does provide a consistent hunt opportunity year after year.  It often is the backup hunt we can pull out of our pocket when other plans fall through.  Sometimes it is even the hunt holding our attention throughout the year since we may be driving by this land on our many trips to and from the office, taking inventory of animals in our ‘backyard’ honey-hole.

What is interesting to me is that these faithful, routine, or ‘backup’ hunts occurring each year will naturally vary depending on where you live.  It is all a matter of perspective. One hunt someone consistently goes on year after year because it is a residential tag and a matter of convenience, may be considered a hunt of a lifetime for someone else several states away.  E.g., An alligator hunt may be a bucket list hunt for someone living in the North, a whitetail hunt may mean an out of state tag for a Westerner, and then an antelope or a Mule deer hunt may be a big deal for someone on the East Coast.  To some these are dream hunts.  To others where the animals are close to home, they are the hunts relied on year after year.  For me?  It’s antelope. I put in for several tags each year that would trump my antelope tag if I got lucky and drew my first choice, but one thing is for sure… I have an antelope tag in my back pocket. It is the backup plan.

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Once opening day rolls around mid-August, it isn’t uncommon for me to have a spare change of clothes in my car – the kind that blend naturally into the prairie land that antelope call home.  Binoculars ride shotgun in the passenger seat, always within arms reach to take inventory of what is roaming the prairie land.  My husband and I, along with our good friend, Allen, share permission to hunt a couple ranches near home.  My phone often rings as I’m on the way home and I receive a report from my husband or Allen on a buck they saw on a specific section of the ranch.  Conversations usually start out like… “Did you see that one up by the windmill?” or “There’s a bachelor herd over by the back ravine” and “They’ve been making their way to the North water hole late afternoon.”

I can remember a couple summers ago when I was driving home from the office and my phone rang.  My bow was in the back seat and a thought was lingering in the back of my mind on whether I would have time for a quick hunt on the way home.  Maybe one of the guys had an update for me.  When I picked up the phone, I could hear the excitement in his voice and I knew Allen had more than just a regular update.  It was good news!  Buck down.  I immediately turned my truck in the direction of the dirt road that led to the ranch.  There was an antelope on the ground and I had to share in the excitement.

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Paying attention to where the bucks were feeding, watering and grazing all summer long had payed off.  Allen faithfully watched the habits of these bucks and had a feeling that as he eyed the bachelor herd graze over a section of the ranch on his way home one evening, that they would make their way down a ravine and over to the next watering hole.  He decided to go for it.  There was enough time to grab his bow and quickly make his way to the other side of the ravine to a natural blind in the brush. Just as he arrived, the bucks popped up over the ravine and Allen arrowed his biggest antelope yet!

One of the best parts – since it was close to home, we all had the opportunity to share in the excitement.  I’m sure that I forgot to change out of my work clothes and may have even laid down in a cow-pie-laden ground to get just the right picture angle.  It was worth it.

If you are fortunate to have a section of land to hunt near your home, it is worth the effort to pay attention to the movement of the animals.  Take the time to study their habits.  You won’t be sorry when it is time to pull out that faithful ‘backup’ tag in your pocket and chase after that animal you’ve been waiting to hunt all year long.

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


When Biscuits, Gravy and Elk Sausage Collide by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson

http://www.fromthedraw.com/

Biscuits, Gravy and Elk Sausage

Biscuits, Gravy and Elk Sausage

We journey through wooded lands, in pursuit of wild game, traveling along unfamiliar paths, known to only those who call the forest home.  With each step we take, we neatly tuck memories in our packs, a keepsake to carry home.  This memento is enough, as the hunt lives on and dwells in one’s memories, impressed in the hunter’s thoughts for years to come.

For the hunter who carried home more than just memories, the recollection of last season’s hunt comes flooding back with each winter meal.  The smell is mesmerizing.  One taste and you can’t help but smile.  Thankfulness overflows as you acknowledge the strength and nourishment it provides; a healthy meal placed before you.  The hunter is reminded again of the path traveled, and the pursuit’s reward.

Yes, each meal prepared in winter months, reminds us of our journeys from the previous year, and brings new hopes of replacing retrospection with new destinations.  An upcoming adventure that fills the freezer once again!

For those who are fortunate to have wild game in their freezer, dig out some breakfast venison sausage, or sweet Italian elk sausage, and find out what happens when homemade biscuits, gravy and elk sausage collide…

Elk Sausage

Elk Sausage

WHOLE WHEAT BISCUITS

2 cups whole wheat flour

1 cup regular flour

4 1/2 tsp baking powder

2 Tbsp sugar

1/4 tsp salt

3/4 tsp cream of tartar

3/4 cup cold butter

1 egg beaten

1 cup milk

preparing biscuits

preparing biscuits

In a bowl combine the flour, baking powder, sugar, salt and cream of tartar.  Cut in the butter until mixture resembles coarse cornmeal.

Add egg and milk.  Stir quickly and briefly.  Transfer to a lightly floured surface and knead lightly (do not over mix).   Roll or pat gently to 1-inch thickness.  Cut into the desired size biscuits (don’t worry about being perfect – the unique shapes are the best)!

Place on a greased cookie sheet and bake at 450 degrees for 12 – 15 minutes.

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SAUSAGE GRAVY

Prepare a basic white gravy by melting 4 tablespoons of butter over medium heat.  Add several tablespoons of floor (one at a time), mixing well with each addition.  As the mixture thickens to a spreading consistency, slowly add 1 1/2 cups milk.  Whisk to combine the butter / flour mixture in with the milk.  Continue stirring with a spatula over medium heat until gravy thickens.  Season with pepper.

Fry breakfast sausage until browned.  Add to gravy, and heap generously over biscuits fresh from the oven!

Then sit back, and let the recollection of your last hunt flood your memory as the biscuits, sausage and gravy collide and dance over your taste buds.

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Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Loosen your grip by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson

http://www.fromthedraw.com/

When first shooting a bow there is a lot to learn … stand this way, find an anchor point or two or three, back tension, don’t punch the trigger, level, breath, etc.  The list goes on and on.

I remember getting so frustrated with my husband when I was first learning because he wanted me to get everything right.  Now don’t get me wrong, he had my best interests in mind which is admirable.  While I appreciate his concern for my accuracy and desire for excellency, it can also be exasperating when you are trying to remember everything and your spouse is whispering in your ear, “You did it wrong, again.”  I know he was just trying to help, but I felt like he was secretly enjoying pointing out my errors.  Ugh.  I wanted to throw an arrow at him, and since I’m confessing, I think I chased him around with one at some point. Don’t worry, a broadhead was not fixed to the tip of my arrow!

DSC_0525

Gals, if you are just learning to shoot, here’s a piece of advice:  Find a non-biased friend or someone from a local pro-shop to help with your shooting technique.  I’ve found that it is much easier to hear constructive criticism from a non-husband source.

With that being said, after years of shooting a bow, I am still working on perfecting my shot.  I know there is always room for improvement.  Sometimes a minor adjustment here or there can bring you to that next level of consistency in your shot.  Since we are now in a hunting off-season where most deer hunting has come to a close, don’t put your bow away! I would encourage you to take a look at your form.  Is there any room for improvement in your shot?  Video yourself and evaluate your form.  Have someone else give you a second opinion.

IMG_1252

I know what I’ll be working on … how I hold my bow, specifically loosening my grip.  I need to make sure I’m holding it correctly with the bow grip in the meat of my palm, letting my fingers relax, and trusting my bow sling.  After a missed shot this last year, I can almost guarantee it was because I was so excited that I gripped my bow which ended up giving just enough torque to throw my shot off.  So, I know I need some work in this area.  I’ve asked a friend at a Pro-Shop to make sure I’m holding my bow correctly. I know it will take practice… I can consistently shoot 20 yard shots all day long, but I quickly learned the hard way that if I haven’t formed the habit of consistently holding my bow correctly, it is way too easy to grip and torque your shot during the heat of the moment when the shot counts. I have a date with an elk in about 9 months from now, and I’m not going to make the same mistake twice!

What about you?  Are you taking strides this winter to improve your shot?  What areas do you need to improve on?

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


An Archer’s Morning by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson

Blog: http://www.fromthedraw.com/

AnArchersMorning1.29.13

Carrying bow in hand and arrows in the other, the archer journeys through the open field.  An established target lays waiting along a well worn path.  The archer doesn’t want to miss the moment.  She makes an appearance briefly each morning, nods and slips away after illuminating the land with glorious stretched out rays.  Each new day is introduced in morning splendor as she swings her lantern of light across the horizon.  She is making her way, evidenced by the surrender of darkness, so the archer quickens his step.  Dawn is drawing near and the archer will be there to greet her.

The rhythm of the draw, aim, and release is mesmerizing, which somehow pauses the spinning of the world as an arrow slices through the crisp clean air.  Fingertips begin to grow numb as Jack Frost makes an appearance, but Dawn’s soft golden rays greets the archer with a kiss simultaneously as the string is anchored to lip’s edge.  The favor is returned as glistening rays dance off the tip of the arrow now slicing through the thin veil of breaking light.  The dance continues.  Anchor.  Breathe.  Aim.  Release.

Morning is now chasing Dawn across the prairie, threatening to snatch up her golden rays as the sun inches higher in the sky.  The brilliant rays of first light has done it’s job and pierced through the archer’s heart.  Dawn’s tranquility has swept by, leaving an archer in an open field thankful for another day.  Through the peep hole of a bow sight, the archer winks and watches as she introduces the day gracefully.  She winks back and slips away with a promise to return to catch the next arrow in flight.

The archer gathers arrows and journeys on, ready to face the day with the promise of Dawn coming again.

AnArchersMorning2.1.29.13

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Holding a First Bow Kill Close to Heart by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

PSE's Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson

I hope the thrill of my first deer kill doesn’t fade away too quickly from my memory. There is something truly wonderful about the whole experience, and I’m sure I am not alone in the endeavor to hold a first bow kill close to heart, and safely tucked into the deep recesses of one’s mind.

I still remember the feeling – it was as if time stood still.

Morning

Morning of First Hunt

The morning of my first whitetail deer hunt I found myself up in a tree stand for the first time in my life, and just as I was getting comfortable with the distance from my feet to the ground below, the silence was interrupted by the sound of brittle leaves being crushed. Something was making its way along the path below, and closing the distance to our stand fast. I glanced up at my husband above in a tree stand, attached to the same tree as mine, and smiled. We watched together in anticipation of what was coming our way. It didn’t take long for the disrupter of the morning silence to make an appearance, and from our perch above the ground we could clearly see the mule deer as he made his way along the path below. Our tags said “whitetail” so we watched and admired the buck as he continued on his morning journey.

Emily Anderson

As a western hunter who is used to hunting from the ground, spot and stalk style, this new view from above had me intrigued and fascinated. I loved being above the action and felt like a giddy school girl when again the sound of *crunch* *crunch* echoed through the trees, signaling the closing distance of another buck. We watched a buck work his way down from the field above and mosey around a big oak towards my side of the tree. After a brief nonverbal discussion, my husband nodded, giving me the green light to take a shot. I slowly reached for my bow, took a breath, came to full draw, picked a spot and settled my top pin. The arrow released and I watched as it made impact on the chosen spot. Thwack!

I remember looking at my husband, looking back at my deer running down the path, looking back at my husband, and then starting to shake uncontrollably. It was an adrenaline rush like none other I’ve ever experienced. I had arrowed my first buck and I was hooked! After shooting that buck, I felt a sense of relief and sheer excitement all wrapped up together in a ball of emotions. Relief due to the sense that all the practice and preparation finally had cumulated into the desired result. My arrow flew true and found its mark. Buck fever had been replaced by a calming feeling just before the shot, and the instant flow of adrenaline as I realized what I had just done, had found its appropriate time to flow through my veins … directly after the kill shot.

First Bow Kill

First Bow Kill

When I first took up bowhunting, I often dreamt about and wondered what I would shoot first with my bow. That question has now been answered for me, and I’m proud to say it was a whitetail.

What about you? What was your first bow kill? Do you still vividly remember the details of that hunt? If it is starting to fade, I would encourage you to take a moment to write it down. You’d be amazed at how that moment in time comes flooding back when you start journaling it out.

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.
 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson on off season fitness


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

Emily starts her off season fitness

Emily starts her off season fitness

January is a month that is readily filled with commitments for the New Year, and on the top of many resolution lists you are most likely to find something related to fitness. My encouragement this time around … resolve to ditch the yearly fitness resolution, and instead make it a habit to simply live healthy which is a daily commitment. January then simply becomes the reminder to do a heart check each year and make sure you are still on track.

PSE's Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson

Going into the office before dark and watching the sun go down on the drive home in the evenings has me longing for warmer days and each year about this time the lack of Vitamin D seems to get to me. I find myself scouring the web for upcoming races and summertime events that provide a deadline or goal to train for. Sure, the ultimate goal is to be as healthy and fit as possible for when opening day rolls around toward the end of the summer, but I’ve found that having a competition type event helps to provide a little extra motivation. Simply put … if you’ve paid for a race or event, you can bet that crossing that finish line, whether it is by way of a run, walk or crawl, will become a priority.

Running Gear

Running Gear

Most events for the upcoming year are actively being posted on websites, and registrations will be opening soon. Don’t wait too long before making the commitment for a summer race / event. Now is the time to start training! Grab your shoes or hiking boots, throw some extra traction on your soles and hit the trails. It won’t be long before the days will begin to lengthen, and you won’t be sorry that you kicked up your training during the winter months so that you are ready to take your training to the next level when the weather turns warm. In addition the extra Vitamin D may help to get you out of the January blues that often come hand in hand with the ending of many hunting seasons. What are you waiting for? Get out there and create some tracks in the snow covered trails!

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.
 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Your Opinion Matters by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

PSE's Emily Anderson Campfire

PSE’s Emily Anderson Campfire

Has this ever happened to you? Sitting around the campfire the evening before the morning hunt, several hunters discuss the plan for the morning and one is strangely quiet. Maybe the “one” is new in the group; or maybe the “one” is the token girl…

The question hangs in the air…. does their opinion matter?

Okay, guys, you’ve invited your spouse, girlfriend or daughter into your hunting camp. They’ve now entered your world of hunting and all that comes with it. They no longer question the reason for all the excitement when hunting season comes around. The girls not only understand the hunting fever and all that comes with it, they now join in the fun at every opportunity. You have won over the other side and together you are now counting down the days until you can do it all again each season. Bows, Camouflage, Arrows, Range Finders, Tree Stands, Backpacks. They all come in pairs, and your designated hunting closet space just shrunk – as evidenced by heels replaced by hiking boots.

But here are some questions for you… Do you value their hunting opinion? Do the girls in your world have a say in the planning? Do they get to voice their opinion when discussing the next hunting tactic?

Guys, hear me out. I know you may be cringing a little at this point. You have been hunting a long time and we (ladies) may be presenting some bizarre ideas. However, here is your challenge… Don’t roll your eyes, discredit or discourage us from our attempt to join the conversation and offer our hunting opinion, because in doing so, you may not realize you are squashing the new gal’s attempt to simply join in. I now understand how challenging this may be, because when I started hunting I honestly didn’t know what I was talking about at times, e.g., not considering weather, thermals, hunting pressure, etc. However, my challenge to you guys is to gently explain to the newbie WHY we may be wrong. Don’t extinguish the spark! And who knows? Maybe that crazy idea will shake things up and it is just the out of the box idea that works!

On the flip side, Ladies, you need to consider a few things before just jumping in and flapping your jaw (I’m speaking from experience here). May I be a little vulnerable? At times, I remember being a bit frustrated during my first years of hunting. I wanted to not only join the conversation; I at least wanted my opinion to be valued. I’m not pointing fingers in any way here, I’m simply saying that as a girl it is easy to let your emotions / feelings rule the day and forget to balance it out with reason. So here are some tips to think about before speaking…

Camp

Camp

1. Experience – Remember that if you are new to hunting; the friends that have invited you into their camp have more experience than you. The simple fact is experience speaks volumes and demands respect. Yes, you want your opinion to be valued, but it is usually experience that is going to win the day. Don’t forget that and instead of turning a deaf ear, it would behoove you to listen to the wisdom from experienced hunters. They have already experienced the thrill of a close encounter, learned lessons during long stalks, or may even think like the animal being hunted… anticipating their next move.

2. Time – Consider the amount of time the group of hunters you are now hunting with have spent together in the woods. They may have hunted the same unit multiple years together, maybe decades. It takes time to become part of the group and develop your own hunting stories. Cherish the opportunity that you are now part of the group, but honor the memory of past hunts you were not a part of. Let them share the stories, and glean valuable information shared from previous hunts.

Outdoors

Outdoors

3. Territory – Respect the fact they trust you with keeping a secret. Most hunters have a favorite hunting spot which is not even whispered about to a close relative or good friend. It is the honey hole on public land that hasn’t been overtaken yet by the masses. Or even private land acquired through hard work in order to be given permission to hunt. These are the places hunters only tell certain friends about – and if you are one of the privileged ones, respect that!

After considering these things, be thankful you are now part of the team and then jump into the conversation. Your opinion does matter!

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson’s Elk Chorizo Pizza


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

This is the time of year we are all dreaming up new recipes for using all the game meat safely tucked away in our freezers, at least I know that I am. Hopefully, a tag has been filled by someone in your household and you also have the “problem” of overabundance of meat that’s just waiting to be made into some delicious entree. If that is the case, then I have a great idea for dinner tonight!

ELK CHORIZO PIZZA
I made this the other night and it was Oh-My-Goodness Good! My taste buds are salivating just thinking about it. Here is the recipe…

Pizza Dough

Pizza Dough

1. Prepare Crust: Defrost one loaf of frozen bread dough. Cut it in half and set one aside. Generously flour the surface of a clean counter top. Roll dough to the desired thickness for your crust. (You can also take advantage of any pizza tossing skills you have.. even if you don’t, it could prove to be fun. Just don’t let the dough fall on the ground!) Place your crust on a round cookie sheet or pizza stone.

Browning meat

Browning meat

2. Brown Meat: Cook your elk chorizo on med-low heat until thoroughly browned. You could also use any type of elk / venison breakfast sausage. I prefer elk chorizo because it has a little more kick!
3. Add Toppings: Spread a thin layer of pizza sauce. Sprinkle mozzarella cheese evenly over sauce. Add elk chorizo and any additional desired toppings.

Toppings!

Toppings!

4. Bake: Slide your pizza into a pre-heated 375 degree oven for about 15-20 minutes until the crust is nicely browned and toppings are cooked. While this one is baking, use the second half of the bread dough and prepare Pizza #2. Enjoy!

Finished Pizza

Finished Pizza

P.s. I have to warn you that it is easy to get distracted while making this pizza because you will be focused on the end result of mouthwatering goodness. If you take off your wedding ring to prepare this pizza, it is a good idea to make sure it is safely stored in a jewelry box or other secure location. I made a VERY expensive pizza the other night when I realized my ring was swept into the garbage. Maybe Santa will bring me an elk wedding ring for Christmas…

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson is Planning For Next Season


Places to hunt

Places to hunt

It’s that time of year again. Deer season is coming to a close for most areas of the country. Accolades have been echoed across social media circles to those who have punched their tag. Proud pictures of smiling hunters next to their deer in the field have been posted everywhere possible online. You would think that hunters across the country would be relieved that the season is over; there is time to now sit back, enjoy a big juicy venison steak dinner and relax for the next several months. But to be honest, I know that is not the case. At least not for me. Yes, I’m eating a steak dinner, but I’m dreaming about the next season while savoring each bite… And so the planning begins. By the end of December or mid-January, I’m already thinking about opening day 2013. Non-hunters may not understand that the beginning of a new calendar year simply begins the count down for when we can do it all again. The end of one season simply marks the beginning of preparation for the next. And if you’re like me, there are several things that need to be weighed during this process.

So, sit back, grab a piece of freshly dried venison jerky and let’s consider together the WHERE, WHEN and WHO for next season hunts. Some of these overlap a bit, but that is because each decision factors into the other in some capacity… First on the list… WHERE to hunt next year. How do you decide where your hunting adventures for the upcoming year will occur? The two biggest things I personally consider each year when considering where I’ll be hunting are my budget, and my bucket-list. Here is a breakdown of what that looks like:

• BUDGET – My budget for the next year is first up for consideration. I know it sounds simple, because if you don’t have the funds for a tag, then you simply don’t have the funds. However, there are sometimes some options here. My husband and I budget throughout the year to be able to apply for and/or buy our tags for the next year. However, not all of your tags need to be bought at the same time. If you plan and do your research, you can lay out good plan of which tags will need to be paid for ahead of time (draw), and which can be bought as over-the-counter. This helps to ultimately spread out the cost over several months. If you are applying for out-of-state tags, that is where the punch to the wallet will occur. However, there are some options here also. Most of the time you can use a credit card to apply for the tag and the cost of the tag will usually only hit your card if you draw the tag. Of course, the best option is to have the funds ahead of time, but using a credit card is a great way to build points if you know that you won’t actually draw the tag for a few years.
• BUCKET LIST – Each year, I consider the big hunts that I want to do someday, and make an effort to be one-step closer to making it happen. Does it mean applying for a tag to build preference points? Does it mean that I simply need to buckle down and start saving more towards my goal? Either way, if you make an effort to be one-step closer to your goal, the likelihood of crossing that dream hunt off your bucket list has a better chance of becoming a reality. Plan for it.
Next up on the list… WHEN will I be hunting next year. This depends on the tag that is drawn. Along with that, there are couple factors to consider when planning the WHEN of your hunt:

Hunting Plans

Hunting Plans

• TIME – This isn’t as much of an issue for some as others. For example, I am fortunate to have several weeks of vacation that I can devote to hunting each year, but that also means that I need to be disciplined and not use it up during the summertime months which is sometimes very tempting! My husband is blessed even more and is able to take off several months…one for elk season and one for whitetail. Depending on how much time you have factors in to how many tags you’ll be able to buy. For example, I consider whether I will be able to spend the time needed if I draw that once-in-a lifetime moose tag this year, or would it be smarter to just put in for preference points instead? As a hunter, I’ve found that it is important to budget my vacation time well in advance so that by the time season opener rolls around, I’m not stuck with an expensive tag in my pocket and no time to hunt.
• SEASON LENGTH – After you’ve established how much time you have, then think about exactly when during each season you’ll be hunting based on the length of the season. Some tags are only valid for a week timeframe, so that is usually a no-brainer. However, for archery elk or whitetail, the season typically last for a month or several months. Therefore, how do you decided exactly when to hunt? I’m not going to list all the pros and cons of early versus late season here or even tell you which is better since there are many personal preferences in this area. Rather, I’ll just point out there are many things to think about when considering your season length and which dates you will focus on hunting: timing of the rut, moon phases, hunting pressure, overlap of other seasons, weather, etc.

PSE's Emily Anderson's Base Camp

PSE’s Emily Anderson’s Base Camp

Finally, Troy and I review WHO we will be hunting with during the upcoming year.
• LOCATION – A huge factor in determining where you will be hunting is figuring out who you will be hunting with. You almost need to consider this first before anything else. Some questions to think about… Will you be hunting with someone new? Do you trust them with your secret hunting hole? Do they match your physical ability? Are they prepared for a backcountry hunt both physically and mentally? If hunting with a regular hunting friend, are you on the same page on where you will be hunting? Discussing this way ahead of the game is key to a successful hunt.
• BASE CAMP – It is never too early to begin thinking about camping arrangements. If you are hunting with a big group, then start planning for a location that has plenty of room and easy access for everyone. If hunting in a smaller group or solo hunting, now is the time to begin going through your gear, doing inventory for next year, and budgeting for the necessary gear you want to add to your pack for the next mountain adventure.
That is my high-level planning list. Let me know what you think! Remember, it’s never too early to plan your next hunt. Good luck in the upcoming year. Happy planning and hunting!

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.
 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Whitetail Passion by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Midwest Hunt

Hunting whitetails is relatively new to me. My first opportunity to hunt whitetail in the Midwest was last year in 2011. I was thrilled to be able to shoot my first buck ever and came home with a nice little 8 point buck.

Since punching that first archery tag, I can officially say that I have caught the whitetail bug. I now understand the passion for hunting these deer that wander the farmlands, fields and woods in the Midwest. I was skeptical at first since I got my feet wet in the hunting world by learning to hunt in the mountains of Colorado. I was certain that I would be utterly board sitting in a tree stand just waiting for something to walk within bow range. Oh how I was wrong! I am now dreaming and scheming of how to obtain more opportunities to arrow bigger and better deer than I have previously.

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Climbing High

There is just something about climbing high up into a tree, knowing that your stand overlooks a field or trail where a scrape has just been visited below. You have a great vantage point for watching the sun creep up over the horizon. You are there before the birds start singing. As the world slowly awakens before you, the soft sweet sound of crunch crunch below signals that a deer is making their way through the woods. There is no stopping it, before even knowing if the sound is produced by a squirrel, doe or shooter buck, the adrenaline begins to pump through your veins.

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson

The memory is still fresh from the other weekend when I had the opportunity to arrow my second whitetail. The adrenaline has now worked its way through my body, but the recollection is still vivid. As the evening light began to fade and the minutes were counting down to the last shooting opportunity, a buck on the horizon made an appearance. He was a couple hundred yards off and following the scent-line that we had laid down earlier. As my husband, Troy, let out a few grunts and then a rattle sequence, the buck began to close the distance fast. I reached for my bow, releasing it from the tree hook, and prepared to draw back.

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Whitetail

As I mentally prepared for the shot, I picked a spot in the landscape where I would draw back if he crossed the line. The buck reached the designated stump and the strings on my PSE EVO were stretched. I now had a view through my peep sight which somehow calmed the previous shaking in my body. It was a rhythm I was used to from all the previous practice. The buck halted to a stop at the sound of one last grunt call. It was all I needed to pick a spot and settle my pin. Thwack! In an instant the broadhead did its job. We watched as the buck sped towards the ditch and never came out. He was piled up at the bottom, and I am proud to be able to say I shot him with my PSE!

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson is Hunting with her husband


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

Emily Anderson

The Andersons

Okay, Ladies, I’ve mentioned it before that I hunt with my husband. While I am so thankful that we share a hobby, there are definitely pros and cons of having the same bowhunting addiction. I thought it would be fun to put together a brief list of pros and cons. Here is what I came up with…

PROS of hunting with your husband:

1. Spending quality time together in the woods. The sport of hunting has allowed Troy and I to spend countless hours together hiking around in the woods. We’ve been able to share so many memories simply because we have this common interest.
2. Opportunity for communication. Seriously. We’ve had some great conversations related to hunting… planning upcoming trips, ethics of hunting, and simply reminiscing on previous hunts
3. Meat! With two hunters in your household, the potential for never having to buy store bought meat just doubled.
4. Competition. Who doesn’t like a little friendly competition with their spouse? I know I do. There’s always the question of who is going to fill their tag first, or even whose animal tastes better.

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Hunting with her Husband

CONS of hunting with your husband:

1. Double punch to the wallet. Your husband’s hobby just became twice as expensive! Say “hello” to two sets of range finders, arrows, camouflage clothes, bows, etc. The list is never ending.
2. Unwanted Coaching. My husband will admit this one. He is pretty tough on me, but I know his intentions are good. When I first started shooting, he critiqued me pretty hard. My form, anchor point, stance, etc., were all subject to review. Honestly, Ladies, I would suggest having a friend or someone at the local archery shop give you pointers when you first start out. I had to and from time-to-time still find myself getting a second opinion from someone other than my husband.
3. Disagreements. There may be times where you have different opinions on where to hunt, or even how often. Communication is key!
4. Vacation Drain. Be prepared to spend all of your vacation time on hunting trips. While I don’t think this necessarily a bad thing, be forewarned that you may start finding yourself investigating what you can hunt even on vacations to tropical locations!

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.
 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson Prepares Hunting Camp Meals


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

PSE's Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson

In my last post, I talked about preparing your body and gear prior to a hunt. In this post I’d like to talk a little bit about food. Who doesn’t like to talk about food, right?One of the last things I do prior to a hunt is prepare all the food for the trip. I like to do as much food prep ahead of time which makes meal time upon returning to base camp after a hunt easy. I don’t want to be fussing with putting something together after I’ve come back from a long hike, it’s dark and I’m tired. Therefore, I do a lot of thinking and planning ahead of time to make sure that my meals are ready to go and all I need to do is heat them up. I usually prepare them a couple days prior to our hunt and then freeze them solid so they are good to pull out of the cooler whenever we want a meal during our hunting week. (Hint: Use a disposable casserole pan so there are no dishes to be done either)

Here are some meal ideas that I return to year after year because they are non-fuss, plus my hunting friends threaten to harm me if I don’t show up at camp with…

ELK LASAGNA
Cook lasagna noodles (el dente)
Prepare sauce – brown 1 lb. ground meat (elk or whatever game meat is in your freezer). Sauté in with the meat, two minced cloves of garlic. Add one can tomato sauce and one can diced tomatoes. Add 1-2 tablespoons of oregano or Italian seasoning. Cover and let simmer for 20 minutes.
Build lasagna – butter the bottom of the pan, and then layer with noodles, then mozzarella cheese, cottage cheese, meat sauce and parmesan cheese. Continue with layers, ending with meat and parmesan cheese until pan is full. Cover with tin foil and freeze.

CHICKEN ENCHILADAS
Cook several chicken breasts, shred and mix in taco seasoning. Prepare a box or two of Spanish rice. Butter the bottom of a 9×13 disposable pan. Build enchiladas with the following ingredients… Black beans, taco chicken, cheese, rice, Pico de Gallo sauce. Roll each enchilada tightly. (I usually fit 6-8 in a pan depending on how big I make them). Cover the top of the enchiladas with a can of cream of chicken soup (Helps to keep them from drying out), and a layer of shredded cheese. Cover and freeze.

PSE's Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Camp Fire

Both of these meals can be heated up either on a grill or oven in a camper (if you have one).

I have lots more hunting meal ideas, so stay tuned for future posts!

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson Hunting Alone


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Hunting Alone

Once and a while the question comes up as to whether or not I hunt alone. The short answer is usually, “no.” Mostly I hunt with my husband. Although, there have been a few times where I have ventured out on my own. These hunts have taken place in familiar areas, where cell service signals are not rare, and with my sidearm securely attached to my belt.

Ladies, if you are pondering the question of whether or not to hunt alone, there are few things you should consider…

The first thing to think about is the type of hunt you are preparing for, and the second factor is the location of your hunt. The type of hunting you prefer, e.g., tree-stand, blind, or spot and stalk, most likely will play a factor into whether or not as a female hunter you feel comfortable with solo hunting. The location in my opinion is a bigger factor. For example, I would not want to venture off on a 10 day back country wilderness hunt by myself. I think I could keep myself from getting lost since I’m usually not directionally challenged; however, I wouldn’t trust myself enough to stay safe. It would also not be an easy task getting the meat out. I am up for a lot of things, but not that type of challenge. I know there are options like drop camps and packing a satellite phone to call your coordinates in for someone to come pack out the meat, but it is still not something that interests me… at least doing it by myself. On the other hand, if I’m hunting deer and had a tree-stand hung and ready to go, I would have no qualms about sitting solo waiting for a white-tailed deer to walk by.

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson’s Hunt

In addition to the type and location of your hunt, here are a few other thoughts to consider prior to venturing off into the woods by yourself…

1. Do you have means to take care of the meat? Make sure you are prepared to gut your animal, or at least have a very good plan for getting a hold of someone quickly that can help. Is there cell service in your area? Remember, the meat is the trophy!

2. Since you are most likely either entering or leaving your hunting area in the dark, be aware of your surroundings. Even though you are armed with a bow, there is still potential for a bad situation to occur, e.g, other individuals with ill intentions, or even other predators in the woods. Be prepared!

3. Lastly, something that a lot of hunters don’t consider is the loneliness factor. This shouldn’t be a problem if you are doing a quick day trip, but if you are planning on spending several days by yourself in the wilderness, be prepared to start talking to yourself. Seriously. It is something that a lot of hunters may not admit, but being by yourself in the woods is not something easy to do. I’ve recently heard several hunters, who have experience in the back country, admit to this. Be prepared to deal with the loneliness factor, e.g., bring a journal or good book to help pass the hours.

PSE's Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson

The urge to venture off into the woods and tag an animal by myself frequently tries to convince me I should. The romance of it all temps me. My “I can do it” attitude threatens to override my common sense, but this urge is quickly replaced by reality and I’m brought back quickly to my senses. In my opinion, hunting with a friend or spouse somehow increases the joy in the hunt. When someone fills a tag, there are friends for high-fiving and helping with the skin, gut and pack out job. Everyone pitches in to take care of the meat. Usually, my part of the team-work is in loading an animal on pack frames and carrying it off the mountain (after the skinning and gutting). It is the part of the process I enjoy the most. The burn in your legs and lungs somehow doesn’t matter or slow me down. The momentary pain can’t stop the smile from creeping over my face due to the knowledge of all the future meals that are loaded on my pack frame. The thought of backstraps and tenderloins is all the motivation I need to take that next step.

Yes, I think I’ll continue to hunt with family and friends… it makes the experience more enjoyable! What about you? Do you prefer solo hunts or group hunts? Why?

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson Preparing For Your Hunt


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com

PSE's Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson on a Hunt

Prior to a hunt, there is always plenty of planning to do. While some are managing land, planting food plots and setting up tree stands, my hunts typically take place on public land in the mountains. Therefore, I can’t speak towards the former type of hunt preparation. However, I can tell you about the latter and how we plan for our hunts out west.

In my opinion, the first thing to do if planning a hunt in the mountains is to make sure you are physically prepared. While I don’t think it is absolutely necessary to be able to run marathons, but anything you do to increase your lung capacity and strength will definitely help, especially if you are not used to the altitude. Plus, ladies, it is always fun to be able to out hike the guys!

PSE's Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Hunting Necessities

Second, make sure that you have all the gear needed. Start making lists! If you are planning a backcountry hunt where you pack in all your gear on your back or on horses, it is extremely important to make sure you have all you need. And then, pack your backpack ahead of time. However, if you are bringing a camper that changes things a bit. When hunting elk, we typically bring everything including the kitchen sink if we our hunting out of a camper… including the grill, which makes it nice for grilling fresh backstraps! I still carry around a backpack each day, even though we have camper for sleeping in each night. This allows us to easily stay out all day if necessary.

Here is a breakdown of what is included in my pack on elk hunts. I don’t think there is much difference for girls and guys in what is included, but you be the judge…

Backpack contents for day trips (usually elk hunting):
1. Heat packs
2. Snacks
3. Elk pee (scent wafers) & safety pin to hang on a tree
4. Extra layer of clothes – usually long johns and extra t-shirt for pack out trips
5. Matches
6. Game bag
7. Green cat eyes for walking out in the dark
8. Water
9. Toilet paper
10. Hunting license
11. Camera
NOTE: Since I wear cargo pants, a lot of my other supplies are safely tucked in all the pockets, which also makes things easy when getting ready for an early morning hunt. (Pockets contain: chapstick, range finder, elk calls, wind check and gloves)

Of course, there are a few obvious things missing, but they are safely tucked in my husband’s pack… knives, rope and gps

So…. do you have any special ritual or planning you do in advance of a hunt?

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson- So Ladies… Bow Selection for Female Archers


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson A woman Archer

As a female archer, there are plenty of options now available that previously were not for women. As more and more women enter the sport of archery, bows are being developed to fit specifically for a woman’s frame. Typically, women have shorter draw lengths, smaller grips, and usually pull less weight. I’m thrilled to see bows that now take these things into consideration for female shooters.

It is critical to make sure that the bow you select fits you correctly. I know that I am guilty of initially wanting to make a bow selection purely based on cosmetic features. And now that bows also have slick names and color choices designed to entice the female buyer, it makes it hard to pay attention to the truly non-aesthetic details.

When considering which bow to buy, keep the following in mind…

1. Grip – How does the bow feel in your hand? Is the grip too big? Too small?

2. Draw Length – If you aren’t sure what your draw length is, visit a local archery shop where they can measure it for you. You want to make sure you find this out prior to purchasing your bow because bows are specifically made for different draw lengths. There is usually an adjustment option available, but there is only so much leeway.

3. Draw Weight – How many pounds can you pull? The draw weight can also be adjusted on bows, but only so much. Make sure that you are buying a bow that you are able to pull back consistently. When the moment of truth occurs and an animal is closing the distance, the last thing you want to happen is to have a bow you are not comfortable pulling back – and being able to HOLD at full draw.

4. Carrying weight – This is one factor that could easily be overlooked. Yes, a bow may feel manageable at the store, but once you start adding on a stabilizer, quiver with arrows, etc., it can all of the sudden feel pretty heavy carrying through the woods. This is especially important if you are planning on hiking through the mountains for extended periods of time.

Emily Anderson - Carrying the Weight of an Elk

Emily Anderson – Carrying the Weight of an Elk

So, ladies, my question to you is… what was the deciding factor when purchasing your bow? Or are you still shopping?

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson- Tucked in a Ditch


By Emily Anderson
www.FromTheDraw.com 

PSE Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Hunting

If you’ve ever experienced hunting antelope with a bow, spot and stalk style, then you know what a challenge it can be. The most common method for hunting antelope, is sitting in a blind next to a water hole, and waiting. When you think you’ve waited long enough, then you wait some more. It can be exhausting sitting in a blind, which feels more like some type of sauna torture device in extremely hot weather, while you wait for a thirsty antelope to come by. Typically those with the most patience win out. If you can sit in a hot blind all day, your chances seem to increase.

If hanging out in a blind for long periods of time doesn’t interest you, or if you are like me and think it feels more like torture than hunting, you’ll be happy to know there are other options for hunting antelope. The trick is to not get spotted by an antelope. They have extremely good vision, which makes sense for their survival on the prairie. But before you start thinking you have good ninja skills and stalking an antelope shouldn’t be that hard, let me remind you… keeping yourself hidden on an open prairie is not an easy task!

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Hunting Antelope

Last weekend, I spent the morning tucked into a ditch next to a water hole. After spying a nice buck on the horizon, Al and I watched and waited to see which direction he would feed to. He eventually dipped down out of sight and we assumed he made his way to the north of where we were sitting. After not seeing him appear where we expected, we figured he headed another direction. Here is a tip… the plains where antelope play are not flat even though the land can easily trick you in to thinking they are. For this reason, these animals can seem to appear from out of nowhere. But it can also play to your advantage. If you can work the drainage ditches that often run from waterhole to waterhole, it provides an opportunity to stalk these prairie ghosts. I had that very opportunity last weekend. I was able to get within 65 yards of a shooter buck and even pulled my bow back, hoping he would close the distance a few yards. However, it didn’t happen. Upon telling my brother of my close encounter, he promptly told me that I needed to practice my ninja skills. Maybe so. Or maybe I just need to try a call next time. (Did you know that antelope can be called in during the rut?)

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson – The Count Down to ELK!


By Emily Anderson
www.FromTheDraw.com 

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson

If you ask me what hunt, I count down the days for each year, I’ll respond without hesitation… Elk!  For this reason, September has a special place in my heart.  Ever since I first heard a bugle echo across a ridge top, I’ve been unable to get the sound out of my head.  The sound is haunting, frightening, and glorious all wrapped up together. However, I don’t mind having it stuck in my head.  On the contrary, I look forward to the chance each year to sneak into a bull’s backyard and have him bark a warning call announcing that I am now in HIS territory.  The bugles in the recesses of my memory are easily recalled when I think of these close encounters.  I’m reminded of moments when a bugling elk was so close that every hair on the back of my neck stood at attention.  And there’s the time when I caught a bull dead in his tracks five yards away from where I sat, and I got to enjoy another bugle and snot blowing demonstration.  And still another memory floods back of the time I slept above timberline and listened to two bulls fight in the meadow nearby while the cows mewed and walked all around my tent.

Allen Fader

Allen Fader

As the aspen leaves begin to show hints of gold each year, you can be guaranteed that my husband and I will be heading out on public land in the wilderness of Colorado.  That is the style of hunting we prefer in our home state… do-it-yourself on public lands.  In my opinion, DIY hunting feels as if the reward is just a little bit greater when you head out on a hunt, unguided and tearing up the tread on your hiking boots.  I want to plant my feet on high places and travel through thick forested lands in my quest to arrow whatever animal I have a tag in my pocket for… and most likely, it will be elk!

Yes, September feels a little bit like Christmas to me.  I get to spend several weeks up in the mountains of Colorado enjoying God’s creation all around me, and if I’m lucky, I’ll release an arrow and come home with meat to fill my freezer.

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson – Allure of the Bow


By Emily Anderson
www.FromTheDraw.com

Emily A

PSE’s Emily Anderson

I can still vividly remember the first time I held a bow.  I was with my husband, Troy, in a local sporting goods store.  He was admiring the row of bows, picked one up and announced, “I want to start hunting with a bow.”  I knew where this was going.  A new hobby, or passion as some call it, was about to be formed – a new addiction that came with an expensive price tag.  Old passions had recently been laid to rest.  The dirt on a bull rope and smell of rosin hanging in the air, gave proof of a recent ride.  Leather chaps were now draped over the bannister, and the adrenaline and rush of an 8 second ride now had a need to be replaced.  And as my husband stood there holding a bow, I knew I couldn’t say, “No.”  Little did I know that I was about to step into this new arena with him… hand in hand.

But I’m getting ahead of myself; let me back up a little…

Autumn has always been one of my favorite seasons of the year.  As days slowly begin to decrease the allotted time for the sun’s rays to shine, the leaves begin to turn shades of gold as if kissed by the sun.  A crisp breeze with a hint of Jack Frost’s breath disrupts their golden display.  They surrender and take turns falling to the forest floor which is now taking on the form of a yellow brick road for deer and woodland creatures to travel on.  As more golden leaves tumble down in a natural confetti fashion, the forest appears as if a parade is about to begin.  In a way it is.  We call it opening day.

As summer was coming to a close the first year Troy and I were married, he asked if I was okay with him hunting that fall.  Hunting was not unfamiliar to me.  I understood what this entailed and was excited about the thought of our freezer filled with game meat.  I had no objections to him wanting to shoot an animal for the purpose of adding lean meat to our table.  I can remember the annual ritual where my dad and brother would venture off into the woods in search of wild game when autumn would roll around.  However, it never occurred to me that this adventure would be something I would be interested in.  When presented with Troy’s question of whether or not he could go hunting, for some reason I found myself responding to my new husband with a question instead of an answer.  The question was simply, “Can I come with?”  I think he was a little taken back at first, but then a smile crept over his face and we’ve been hunting together ever since.

Emily

PSE’s Emily Anderson

For our first couple years hunting together, we would arm ourselves with rifles, and don bright orange.  Our clothes consisted of heavy camouflage jackets and winter boots.  During rifle season, it wasn’t uncommon to be hunting with a blanket of snow on the ground and frozen toes in my boots.  Sleeping arrangements consisted of a GP medium tent and breakfast was usually an attempt to cook frozen eggs over a campfire.  After a couple years of hunting elk this way (and without punching a tag), we found ourselves once again preparing for opening day.  While in the hunting section of the sporting goods store, purchasing ammunition and admiring numerous elk mounts on the wall, Troy could no longer stand the allure of the bows. Like a chorus line beckoning to come take a look, they were all lined up hanging neatly on the racks.  He gave in.  Picked one up.  And, I was forced to answer the underlining question of “Can I buy one?” as he stated, “I want to start hunting with a bow.”

As still fairly newlyweds with limited funds, I glanced at the price tag and thought it might be smart to delay the inevitable just a bit.  I struck a deal with my husband. He could have the bow as soon as he brought home some elk meat during rifle season.  Now, mind you, Troy was quick to point out that he had shot plenty of elk before he met me.  But somehow my deal stuck, and not long after I was eating elk meat for dinner and Troy was shopping for a new bow.

I quickly realized that bow hunting was a whole new world, and if I wanted to continue hunting with my husband, I would need to look into archery as well. The question was how I would present this idea in a way that he couldn’t say no.  I was now the one holding the bow and pleading with my brown eyes. Before the words even escaped my mouth, I was presented with the same challenge I had given Troy several months ago – Shoot an elk with your rifle first.  That fall, while Troy was at work, I fulfilled the challenge by shooting my first elk and packing it off the mountain.  I called him as soon as I got cell service, and proudly announced, “Let’s go bow shopping.”

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


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