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Better Bowfishing by PSE’s Dustin Jones


By Dustin Jones

http://www.highcountrybowhunter.com/

Throughout the summer months it can be difficult for hunters. There is the anticipation for the upcoming archery season with the lull of nothing to hunt. This time of year is well spent scouting for a new hunting spot or making sure the old stand will still be a reliable spot. Between scouting and practicing the excitement starts to build and the anticipation of the upcoming season becomes, well almost unbearable at times. One thing that I have found that is a great summer activity that scratches the hunting itch a little is bowfishing.

Curt Coates Bowfishing on Bear Lake

Bowfishing here in Idaho is a blast and there are several lakes and rivers that have an abundance of carp to chase. If you look online about bowfishing, you’ll see a lot of videos that shows people going out on a boat both in the daylight and the evening. While this is one of the most popular ways, I have had just as much luck shooting from the banks of the river or lake.

Melissa Coates Bowfishing on Bear Lake

One of the hardest things to remember about bowfishing is the aiming. The majority of people (myself included) who go out bowfishing for the first time end up missing the fish because they shoot too high. The reason is because of refraction. The fish looks like it is in one spot but because of the light reflecting off the water, the fish is actually lower than what it really is. A good rule of thumb would be to aim at the bottom of the fish, and then aim down about 6 inches or more. It takes some getting used to but just like any type of shooting, practice makes you better. Obviously if the fish are right on the surface of the water you wouldn’t aim low, but if they are down a little deeper you typically want to drop about 6 inches for every foot they are in the water. Just remember to aim lower than you think.

Carp on the Surface (photo by Kevin Jones)

Another important thing to pack is a good set of polarized sunglasses. Wearing a pair of polarized sunglasses helps take the glare off the water and you will be able to see more fish. Especially when fishing from the bank the glare off the water can be pretty extreme. The best time that I have found to bowfish for carp has been early morning or late afternoon and the glare on the water is very intense. I haven’t been out at night yet but I have heard that it is just as good if not better at night.

Curt Coates with his Carp

Lastly one thing to remember that you’ll be glad you have if you shoot one of those 30 pound carp is a glove. If you are shooting a bow without a reel and are pulling the line in by hand, you’ll be glad you are fighting the carp with a good leather glove on. I have the PSE Kingfisher set up and I just pull the arrow in by hand and I usually keep one in my back pocket just in case I shoot a big one. The last thing you want to do is shoot a monster carp and grab hold of the string just to get your finger or hand sliced open. These fish can fight like no other.

Bowfishing is a great way to get out and hunt throughout the spring and summer months. Be sure to look up the regulations in your state and get out there and enjoy some summer time bowfishing!

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.

Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Better Optics Make for Better Hunting by PSE’s Dustin Jones


By Dustin Jones

http://www.highcountrybowhunter.com/

Out here in the west, my style of hunting is mainly spot and stalk, and just like any style of hunting, it requires a lot of scouting to pattern the animal and ensure that you will be hunting in the right area. Once you think you’re in the right area, you still have to find the animals before you can put a stalk on them. One of the most important pieces of equipment that you will find with me every time I hunt are my binoculars. A good quality pair of optics will go a long way in almost any hunting situation.

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The best way to spot and stalk is to spend a good amount of time spotting the hillsides and drainage areas. Finding where the animal is and watching what it is doing helps you to set up a game plan to put the sneak on. One thing to do is get to a high vantage point where you can sit and glass a large area. Spend the time scanning over the area, taking your time and looking for different shapes: ears, antlers, or any part of what could be a deer, elk, bear, or moose. You can see in the pictures below a nice bull moose that we were able to sit and glass in order to get a good look at him.

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I always pack my binoculars with me on every hunt, but when I am headed out on an elk hunt I make sure to pack my spotting scope as well. Being able to set up a spotting scope and just glass mountainsides gives me the advantage on locating the elk to construct a game plan. I use the Minox MD 50 W when I go elk hunting.  It is lightweight enough that I can throw it in my pack and not take up room while providing high magnification to allow me to get a good look at the animals I am chasing. When you are hunting spot and stalk elk, you definitely don’t want to be packing a lot of weight in your pack as you go up and down deep canyons while you are putting on the sneak. The size and weight of the MD 50 W is just right to take along with a nice lightweight tripod to set it up on.

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Once you spot the elk and you are putting the sneak on, pack up your spotting scope and rely on your binoculars moving forward. A durable and lightweight set of binoculars is vital when spot and stalk hunting. Again, trekking up and down steep canyons is difficult as it is and having a heavy pair of binoculars will just slow you down. The BL 10 x 44 binoculars from Minox provides just what you need. They are lightweight and quick to focus on the object, which is exactly the kind of performance you want as you’re putting the stalk on a herd of elk.

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When moving in closer to the elk, you need to stop and take a break every once in a while in order to make sure you are headed in the right direction and the elk haven’t decided to move in another direction. You always need to check on your progress as you move in to get a shot. You don’t want to just pick a spot and head that direction without stopping to check if the elk is still there. So always make sure that you can stay hidden but be able to check on the elk every now and then.

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The key point is to take the time to glass and make sure you have some quality glass. It will surprise you how much you are missing if you just take the time to slowly scan a mountain side. It takes a lot of patients to just sit and glass but in the end you will see more animals. Best of luck and enjoy this time of year as you get out and scout for the upcoming season. Be safe and enjoy!

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.

Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Benefits of 3-D Archery by PSE’s Dustin Jones


By Dustin Jones

http://www.highcountrybowhunter.com/

Spring is here which means that I am getting closer to chasing antelope and elk. Predator hunting is the only season that I’m hunting right now but there is one more season that I look forward to this time of year. I am taking advantage of practicing and participating in the many upcoming 3-D archery shoots.

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There is so much you can learn and grow from as a bowhunter by shooting 3-D targets. I’m not saying that shooting a block target is bad or that you should only shoot 3-D targets. When you get the chance to shoot at a life-sized deer, elk, turkey, or any animal you are pursuing, you gain that experience that you otherwise can’t from just a block target. I wanted to share some of the benefits that I have gained.

Shot Placement

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Sure the vitals on a deer are all in the same place, just as every elk has their vitals in the same place. But what happens when you get an animal just slightly quartering towards you or away from you? What about if they are bedded down? There are so many different possible situations that you could encounter while hunting that you couldn’t possibly prepare for everyone, but you can prepare for a lot of them by shooting at life-size targets. Being able to set up a quartering shot, long distance shot, or even a kneeling shot will help prepare you for those situations better. You can also quickly walk up and analyze the shot placement, make any adjustments and try again.

Realistic Situations

You can see different situations and scenarios in this picture

You can see different situations and scenarios in this picture

You spot your animal and you notice that there will be just this one little opening for a possible shot, should you take it or let it pass? Setting up a realistic situation is very easy to do and great practice. Set up your target with some brush in the way so you have to adjust a little, or even set it up at odd distances instead of at the regular 20, 30, or 40 yards. Sometimes those shots that are 36 or 43 are just enough to get you to over-think your shot. The two shoots I mentioned in the beginning are great examples of this as they are set up on a mountain and you scale the mountain to take your shot on different animals in different situations.

Pure Enjoyment

Teaching my son Fynch while he's young

Teaching my son Fynch while he’s young

When I shoot either at the 3-D range or at a local shoot, I am usually with friends or family when I go. Being able to have great company and friendly competition always adds to the level of enjoyment. Let’s be honest, it is much more fun to shoot at something that resembles the animal you will be pursuing rather than a cube. Having friends or family share in the archery experience is priceless. My wife actually owns a bow but has made it very clear she does not want to shoot a live animal, but she loves getting out and shooting 3-D targets.

Fynch and his Bear

Fynch and his Bear

These are just some of the many benefits of shooting 3-D. There are plenty of opportunities to get out and experience shooting 3-D. What are some of the benefits that you have encountered?

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.

Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Consistent Practice by PSE’s Dustin Jones


By Dustin Jones

http://www.highcountrybowhunter.com/

Here in Idaho it gets more and more difficult to practice during the winter months due to the snow and the cold. I practice outside so when it starts getting snowy and cold it makes it harder to get out and shoot. Sure there are a few places around that have indoor shooting areas but the longest shot is about 25 yards and I have to pay. While this is great for practice sake, I like to shoot longer distances to make the shorter ones easier and I like to shoot for free. But all in all it is best to practice between the seasons.

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Consistency is what every bowhunter wants to achieve. Many people think that it is just simple to pick up a bow and shoot bull’s eye after bull’s eye. While there are some that can do this; I for one need constant practice. I don’t consider myself a professional by no means so there is always room for improvement.

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One of the most common ways to improve your accuracy is eliminating your bow toque. As you are shooting and you notice your arrows are consistent up and down but off left and right, you are experiencing some bow torque. The main reason that causes bow torque is your grip and PSE’s Emily Anderson wrote a great article on Loosening Your Grip.

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I actually have been trying to focus on this as well for my own form. I did find a useful tool that actually helps you attain the proper grip. I used the True Shot Coach and it helped tighten my groups. Like I mentioned I don’t consider myself to be a professional but I felt confident in shooting my bow. I did notice that I had the occasional stray arrow that would be off to the left or right. This meant that I had some bow torque that I needed to correct and this actually helped.

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The key is to practice and strive to find ways to improve. I am out there as often as I can, hauling my target out through the snow and braving the freezing temperatures just to get a few rounds in when I can. So make sure you get out and keep practicing because the 2013 season is slowly approaching!

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Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.

Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

 

 


How I Cope With the Offseason by PSE’s Dustin Jones


By Dustin Jones

http://www.highcountrybowhunter.com/

Sunset On The Last Day

Sunset on the Last Day of the Season

There is that moment that comes around every year that every hunter dreads, the last day of the season. You dread the fact that you no longer are able to get out and enjoy the thrill of the hunt. When the sun finally sets on that day you come home, kick off your boots, and think about the long wait that you are going to have until the next season. You ponder about the close encounters, missed opportunities, and start planning on how you can change to seal the deal next season. That is if you had a season like mine. If you were successful you think about the things you did right and why the worked. But even if you were successful there is always room for improvement.

Big Ole Coyote

Big Ole Coyote

During the off season there are several things that I do to keep honing my skills. One of my favorites is to hunt coyotes. This is not only a great way to keep hunting but it also helps the deer population. Now hunting coyotes is a challenge with a rifle, so being successful with a bow is even more of a challenge. A challenge which I have yet to accomplish so far but definitely something I have been shooting for.

Beautiful Fox

Beautiful Fox

Throughout the hunting season I have seen several pictures of coyotes and foxes all along the same trail that the deer frequently use. This is why I continue to hunt in my same general area for deer, but now I change the game of thinking and hunt fox and coyotes. I still set out trail cameras because I am able to get pictures of some predators and still get to keep an eye on the deer that continue through the same pathway.

Coyote Hunting From a Blind

Coyote Hunting From a Blind

I still do hunt them from a tree stand but I also enjoy hunting predators from the ground in a ground blind. This is just because during the colder months while the deer season is closed, I can keep warmer sitting in a ground blind than in my tree stand. Also I have been busted way too many times by predators sitting in a tree stand so I have decided to try more ground blind hunting for predators.

Coyote Track

Coyote Track

All I know is that my EVO and I are itching to send an arrow through a large coyote or fox during this downtime. This helps me cope with the break of the big game hunting season. I am still hunting and honing my skills, but it is a completely different animal and a new challenge. So get out there and keep shooting.

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.

Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Taking a Good Picture by PSE’s Dustin Jones


By Dustin Jones

http://www.highcountrybowhunter.com/

Nothing is more exciting than taking an animal with your bow. All of the time that you have put into scouting, preparing, and finally taking that shot has finally paid off. After all of the celebration of recovering your animal has taken place, the next step that most anyone will want to do is take a picture to remember the hunt. Something that I like to take into account is showing respect to that animal. Now I am not saying that the way I take pictures is the way that you should take your pictures, because trust me I still need some work in this area, but there are some tips that will help you capture a good trophy picture.

My first antelope.

My first antelope.

First of all, do your best to remove any blood from the animal. If you are near water it makes it pretty easy to clean up some of the blood using a rag or something to wipe down the bloody area. If cleaning off the blood isn’t possible, usually there is one side that is less bloody than the other. Try and roll the animal or even position the animal in a way that hides most of the blood.

This is an antelope that I had taken and I was so excited to have shot my first antelope with a bow that I hurried to take the picture. You can see there is some blood that I could have washed off and I could have gotten in a better position to see the horns.

My first deer with archery equipment.

My first deer with archery equipment.

Secondly, take care of the tongue. Shove the tongue back in the mouth, hold the bottom jaw, sew it shut, or just cut it off but either way do something to get the tongue out of the picture. That has been one of the biggest things that I have learned to help make a photo look more presentable. I tend to get in a rush after I kill an animal that I forget to take the time to check for the tongue. As you can see in my picture that I could have stuck the tongue back in his mouth and it would have made the photo look a little better.

Dustin Goose 2008
Lastly, show it off. Get down so you are able to show off the antlers (if you were blessed enough to shoot one with them) or just the animal itself. Pictures tend to look better if you are down on the same level as the animal versus you standing over top of the animal. This allows you to truly show off the animal and it just looks better.

 

My dad's elk.

My dad’s elk.

This is one of my favorite pictures of my dad. As you can see, he got down at the same level of his elk and you are able to see the size of the antlers, there isn’t any blood, and the elk’s tongue is not hanging out of his mouth. I’m not saying this is the perfect picture but you can tell the difference between the previous photos and this photo. This is a larger animal with a bigger rack but there were plenty of things that I could have done in my photos to be a better photo to show off.

So when that moment arrives that you get to take some pictures of your kill, take the time to prepare for a great photo that you’ll be proud to show off. You put forth a lot of effort to hunt the animal, so put forth the effort to take a great picture to show off the animal.

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.

Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Dustin Jones on Release Aides


By Dustin Jones
http://www.highcountrybowhunter.com/

TRU Ball Release

TRU Ball Release

When I purchased my first compound bow, I purchased the ready-to-shoot option which included a release aid. I thought to myself that I would probably need to upgrade at some point thinking that the release that came with the bow must not be a very reliable one if they were just giving it away in an archery package. I am still using that same T.R.U. Ball Cyclone release that I got 5 years ago to this day. I have always told myself that when this one starts acting up or fails on me then I’ll upgrade, but it has yet to do so.

There are many different styles of release aids to choose from and my biggest suggestion is if you can, try some different ones out and pick the one that best fits your needs. There is the wrist/caliper release, handheld or finger release, back tension release, and an automatic or hydraulic release. I personally use the wrist/caliper index finger release with the double jaw or caliper which is probably one of the most common releases used among bowhunters. Here are some of the reasons why I still shoot this style of release and probably will for quite some time.

Trigger On My Release

Trigger On My Release

1. The release uses a trigger that is similar to a trigger on a firearm. Even if you have never fired a firearm, there is something familiar to us all that by pulling a trigger results in an action. This is why I have felt the most comfortable with this style of release. I initially started hunting with a firearm before I started archery hunting and have been very comfortable shooting something with a trigger using my index finger.

2. The draw weight of the bow is supported by the wrist. This is a huge reason why I enjoy using this style of release. I am able to draw my bow and hold it as it is drawn much easier and longer because it is supported by my wrist. This allows me to keep my hand and fingers relaxed which helps reduce any extra tension or torque on the bow while I am drawing or shooting.

Calipers

Calipers

3. It’s quick and easy to attach to my bowstring. The calipers, or jaws, quickly and easily attach to the d-loop allowing for a quick draw and release when needed. When that moment comes and I am not completely ready I know that my release can easily be attached and I can quickly draw my bow.

Caliper Release

Caliper Release

Will I upgrade? Yes I more than likely will upgrade to a new release at some point but I will definitely be using the same style of release. I know that there are many hunters out there who use some of the other styles and it works for them. When you are searching for that piece of archery equipment that is one of the biggest factors when looking around, find what works for you. Get out there and try out some of the different release aids and find out which one you are the most comfortable shooting with. For me I will definitely stick with a wrist/caliper release.

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.

>Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Dustin Jones on Trail Cameras


By Dustin Jones
http://www.highcountrybowhunter.com/

Trail Camera

Trail Camera

Setting out trail cameras is a way to keep hunting even when the season comes to a close. To me it is just as exciting setting one out and coming back a couple weeks later to see what it has captured. I’m like a kid on Christmas as I sit and wait in anticipation. I wanted to share with you some tips to help make sure you are getting decent pictures.

The first thing is finding a spot to put the camera. Find a well-used trail, a food plot, water hole, or just a spot that looks like it has lots of activity. There are sometimes that I have set up a trail camera on what I thought to be an awesome spot and came to find out that it was used very seldom. Look for fresh sign with lots of recent activity.

Trail Cam Shot

Trail Cam Shot

Don’t point the camera at 90° angle to the trail unless you are using a mineral lick, scrape, or bait. Majority of hunters setting out their trail camera place it on the nearest tree to the trail and set it perpendicular to the trail. This causes frustration when you go and pick up your camera because more than likely you are going to get blank pictures or partial pictures of animals. When you point the camera at a 45° angle down the trail you increase your odds of getting a shot of the entire animal versus a partial shot.

Remove any obstructions. I know that you want to hide your camera but if there are any obstructions in the way there are several things that can happen. First you will get pictures of nothing because that obstruction may be moving in the wind causing the camera to be set off. Second, whatever is obstructing the camera will be lit up by the flash whether it is an LED or white flash. The best thing to do if you don’t want people to mess with your trail camera is to invest in a security case for the camera. The last thing you want to do is spend money on the camera just to have it stolen a couple weeks later.

Early Season Buck

Early Season Buck

Lastly, pay attention to the sun. When at all possible make sure that when you set up the trail camera not to have it be pointing in the sun. Whether it is in the morning or the evening, try to make sure that the sun rises and sets behind your trail camera. This will help reduce blank images as well as wash out images. When the trail camera is facing the sun and it takes a picture, you will have an extremely white washed out image. The best thing to remember is to have your camera point to the north. The sun’s path will be slightly to the south of the trail camera if you do so and this will greatly reduce washed out images.

One thing that is always promising yet frustrating at the same time is setting up trail cameras. The promising thing is that you are able to see if there is anything moving through that area while you hunt. The frustrating part about it as well is you get to see some of the animals that come by and with my luck I’m either there a day late or a day early. But all in all it is a great way to monitor where you are hunting and it helps you try and pattern the animals. So get out there and have some fun setting up your trail camera.

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.
 
Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.
 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Dustin Jones Explains the Benefits of a Tree Stand


By Dustin Jones
http://www.highcountrybowhunter.com/

View From 2 5Feet

View From 2 5Feet

Hunting can be done in many different ways. You can set up and do a spot and stalk hunt, set up a ground blind, or even set up a tree stand. Whichever way you choose to hunt the key is to stay out of view. There are many instances where one set up would be preferred over the other but I want to focus on a couple of the benefits of sitting in a tree stand.

One of the major benefits of sitting in a tree stand is obviously being above the animal you are hunting. When you are up in a tree you are able to see further which can help you prepare for your shot. As you watch that animal make its way towards you, you can prepare yourself mentally as well as physically. When I see that deer or elk moving in closer, I start to determine where he will come walking by and where my shot will be. Then as quietly as possible I start to position myself while watching the animal so that I am not getting busted. They still look up in the trees so it is important to make very subtle movements as you are preparing for the shot.

Deadly View From TreeStand

Deadly View From TreeStand

Also being above the ground you are carrying your scent up the tree with you. I know that your scent will be dispersed as you are sitting in the tree, but you are up off the ground instead of on the same level as their nose. I’m not saying that you do not need to worry about scent control. Scent control should be a ritual no matter what style of hunting you are doing. While I am sitting in my stand I like to carry a scent wafer that I can set on a limb next to me to help cover my scent because let’s be honest, according to deer we stink.

The most important thing to remember about sitting in a tree stand is safety. Always wear a safety harness while in your stand, there is no animal worth the chance of sitting your stand and seriously injuring yourself or worse. When you are setting up your stand be sure to set it up at a distance that you are comfortable with. If you are uneasy with heights then set up your stand at a height that you are able to sit in comfortably. With this being said, I like to set my stand anywhere from 20 – 25 feet off the ground. This height for me is comfortable and it gives me a great view of the surrounding area.

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.
Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Dustin Jones Hunting- A Positive Influence


By Dustin Jones
Dustin Jones and Son Fynch

PSE’s Dustin Jones and Son Fynch

There are numerous reasons why I enjoy bowhunting. I love being outdoors and taking in all that nature has to offer. There is something about walking through the woods with a bow in your hand in search of an animal that cannot be described. For me hunting in general has much deeper meaning.

When I was younger and just starting to hunt, my dad taught me not only about hunting but values that would carry over into my everyday life. There have been countless times when my dad and I would sit and talk about life and what’s on our mind while we would glass the hillside or eat lunch under a big pine tree. I was able to tell my dad anything and know that I had his full attention; well unless we heard an elk bugle off in the distance then we both would get distracted. Some of the greatest memories that I have with my dad are while we have been out hunting.

Keegan and Brock

As a family, we love sharing our passion for the outdoors with those around us. I remember when we started introducing one of my cousins to hunting because he had asked my dad to take him. He was pretty quiet and at times timid but you could tell that he was excited to be out there. As we began teaching him about being persistent, determined, and patient you could tell he was just a sponge soaking it all in. Soon he was breaking out of his shell and being more open with us after several trips.

Keegan and his Ducks and Goose

It didn’t take him long to get hooked. He loves to hunt and has just as strong of a passion for it as we do. He would talk about it and want to go as often as he could, in fact he would hurry home after school and sit in his tree stand for a couple hours before diner. After a while his dad started to show interest in getting back into hunting. He had not been hunting in years but wanted to spend that time with his son. As they started going hunting together, his two younger boys started showing interest in going hunting with him as well. It is great to see them all get out and enjoy hunting together. All I can think about is those times that I spent with my dad out in the woods and think how neat it was to see them do the same.

PSE’s Dusin Jones Father and Weston

The memories that I have with my dad are some that I will never forget. I am grateful for the lessons that I have learned and for the bond that it has formed within our family. Introducing a child to hunting is a rewarding experience and you never know the impact it may have on their lives. As I take my kids hunting I hope to create memories with them that they will never forget.

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.

Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


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