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Five More Secrets to Scouting for Deer Before the Season with PSE’s Mark Drury


PSE’s Mark Drury

Editor’s Note: Mark Drury of Saint Peters, Missouri, the founder of M.A.D. Calls, co-owner of Drury Outdoor Productions with his brother Terry and a long-time avid bowhunter also is a member of PSE’s Pro Hunt team. This season Mark will be shooting the new PSE Dream Season EVO.

Secret No. 6: You’ve got to have good glass to scout for bucks. I want to stay at least 400-yards away from the fields that I’m scouting. For this reason, I’ll usually use 10X binoculars when I’m scouting and/or use a spotting scope. Eastern hunters don’t take advantage of spotting scopes nearly as much as western hunters do, and you’ll rarely see an eastern hunter scout with a spotting scope or 10X binoculars. However, remember, the further you stay away from the deer, the less human odor you’ll introduce to your hunting site, and the better your odds are for taking an older-age-class buck. Too, by using quality binoculars and spotting scopes, you can spend more time scouting from your truck, which keeps your human odor in your vehicle. I use a window-mount device for my spotting scope to mount the scope on the window.

Secret No. 7: I’ll begin to move tree stands or set-up new tree stands, as I learn more about the deer from my scouting program. I hang many tree stands on the farm I hunt during January and February, after deer season. Then, during July and August, I go check these tree stands to make sure they’re still safe and secure. I hang new tree stands, so that I will have stands in the location where the deer will be traveling in the beginning of bow season. The two factors that determine the day I will hang a tree stand are weather conditions and time of day. In the summer months, I try to hang my tree stand in the middle of the day when the weather is hottest, and when I’m almost certain rain will come in the afternoon. Because hot weather helps evaporate human odor, and a rain washes it away, I know that my human odor won’t linger long, and the rain will wash away what human odor I do leave. I wear long pants and long-sleeved shirts made of breathable material when I’m going through the woods. I want all of the stands I’m going to hunt from during the upcoming deer season to be in place by the middle of August or the first of September. This way when I start bowhunting in October and November, I’ll have fresh stands to hunt from that don’t have any human odor associated with them.

Secret No. 8: My brother Terry and I have several farms we hunt. Before the season comes in, we try to have 80- to 100-tree stands in place and ready to hunt from on these farms. With that many stand sites, there’s no way we can remember or find all of them. We plot out every tree-stand site with GPS. We log each stand site into the GPS and give each one a name. We also record all of our stand site names, location and every wind direction that the stand can be hunted from on paper. By using this method, we can turn on our computer in the morning and go to www.weather.com to learn what wind direction we will have that day in our area. Then we check our list of stand sites and see which stands we can hunt with a favorable wind. Once we have decided the stand sites we can hunt from, we pick-out the stand where we believe our chances are best for taking a buck that day. Then, we pull that stand site up in our hand-held GPS, go straight to it in the dark, get into the tree and are ready to hunt before daylight.

Secret No. 9: I begin to pick the bucks I want to hunt from the motion-sensor-camera information and from observing the deer in the field. The bucks I’ll try to hunt aren’t always going to be the biggest bucks I see. The secret is determining from the bucks you have identified which bucks appear on the trails the most often during daylight hours. Some bucks have a tendency not to move until after dark. If you attempt to hunt these bucks, you can hunt several days and not see those bucks during daylight hours. However, if you hunt for the bucks that have a tendency to move-down trails and be in the green fields during daylight hours, you drastically increase your odds for taking a buck during the first week of bow season. Once I identify these bucks, I may move some of the cameras and my tree stand to learn all I can about these individual bucks I’ve decided to hunt. Knowing which bucks move during daylight hours gives me a tremendous advantage when hunting season opens. I can learn which bucks move the most during daylight hours by scouting during the summer using binoculars, spotting scopes and motion-sensor cameras without spending much time in the woods and alerting or spooking the deer.

Secret No. 10: I want to find the best spot to take the buck I want to hunt and know where he is living and moving during bow season. If I try to take him over the green field or the agricultural crop, I may spook him and the other deer that are coming to that food source. I’ve learned from my motion-sensor cameras that most bucks will move to water before they’ll go to feed. My brother Terry and I have learned that often the most-productive place to have a tree stand site for older-age-class bucks in the early season is along the trail that the bucks use when they’re going to water.

To learn more about Mark and Terry Drury and Drury Outdoors, visit http://www.druryoutdoors.com/.

For more bowhunting tips, check-out “Bowhunting Deer: The Secrets of the PSE Pros,” a new eBook for Amazon Kindle by John E. Phillips. You also can go to http://www.amazon.com/kindle-ebooks and type-in the name of the book to find it. Too, you can download a free Kindle app that enables you to read the book on your iPad, computer or SmartPhone.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Five Secrets to Scouting for Deer Before the Season with PSE’s Mark Drury


Mark Drury

PSE’s Mark Drury

Editor’s Note: Mark Drury of Saint Peters, Missouri, the founder of M.A.D. Calls, co-owner of Drury Outdoor Productions with his brother Terry and a long-time avid bowhunter also is a member of PSE’s Pro Hunt team. This season Mark will be shooting the new PSE Dream Season EVO.

Secret No. 1: I plant green fields with Mossy Oak’s BioLogic in areas where I have easy access with my truck to study the green fields, but I don’t plan to hunt them. I plant long narrow strips that are invisible from a public road but very visible from a woods road. During the summer months, the wind direction in our section of the country often is a south wind. I want these long fields to be where I can either walk-in or drive-in and scout these fields with a south wind, so the deer won’t be able to smell me. I plant two different types of green fields. One is what I call an observation field, which allows me to see the deer on the property during the summer months that I have to hunt. The other field is what I call my hidey-holes. I plan to actually take the bucks from these green fields that are planted in or near thick cover. The way you plant your green fields determines whether you’ll be able to scout successfully for deer season or not.

Secret No. 2: I start hunting a buck in July when the buck’s antlers are just beginning to develop. One of the secrets to consistently taking bucks is knowing which green fields bucks are coming to, and which green fields does prefer. I plant BioLogic in the spring, so I’ll have summer green fields where the deer can feed. I go to these fields in July to identify the trails the deer are using to come into those green fields and put RECONYX motion-sensor cameras along these trails to get pictures of the bucks coming to the green fields. Then I know which green fields each buck is utilizing. Trail-monitoring cameras enable a hunter to find big bucks, and to know where they’re moving quickly and easily and what time of the day or night they’re moving and how big the deer are. Even when I’m scouting, I wear camouflage.

Secret No. 3: Deer change their nutritional needs from green fields to soybean fields, as the summer progresses in Missouri, my home state. One of the keys to scouting is noticing when the deer switch their feeding patterns and then moving your motion-sensor cameras to new trails to keep-up with deer movement. When the Missouri deer leave my green fields and go to soybean fields in August, I change my cameras from the green fields and put them on trails leading to soybean fields and other agricultural crops to learn which bucks are going to these fields. For trail cameras to be effective, you have to move the cameras as the deer change food sources. If you do, you can keep-up with the location of the bucks on the property and watch these bucks’ antlers grow and develop. Another advantage to using the trail cameras is that you disturb the area where you plan to hunt very little. All I have to do to scout efficiently is go to the trail camera and change-out the film, which means I have little human impact on the deer.

Secret No. 4: You must know when to go to the cameras. During the summer months, as I’ve said earlier, the deer will move very little. I’ve learned I usually won’t get more than four or five pictures of deer per day on a good trail during July and August. So, I don’t spend nearly as much time in my hunting area getting the pictures. Another big advantage this method of scouting gives me is that I’m scouting every day from 10- or 20-different locations and not leaving any human scent in those regions. I’m not pressuring the deer that I plan to hunt in the fall during the summer months. In addition to wearing camouflage clothing, I usually wear a head net and gloves when visiting my cameras. I want to get to the cameras as quickly and as quietly as possible, leave as little human odor I can and be invisible to the deer.

Secret No. 5: I like to actually see the deer, especially the bucks I’ll be hunting in the fall, besides using the trail-timer camera. But once again, I want to see the buck from a distance and not disturb him by getting too close. I’ve learned from my motion-sensor cameras that the first 10 days of a full moon is when I’ll see the most big bucks coming to a green field late in the afternoon. I’ll take advantage of the deer’s reaction to the phases of the moon during the summer months, just as much as I do during the fall and winter months. I want to see the bucks on the green field to try and determine their personalities and their temperaments. Some bucks will be very bold, while other bucks will be very skittish. Some bucks will walk right out in the middle of a green field, while other bucks will hold on the edge. By being able to study the bucks through binoculars or spotting scopes from a long distance, I can learn the personality of each buck. If you’re going to go to a green field and study the bucks, you’ll want to go to that field when the most bucks will be on it. I’ve learned that not only most of the bucks, but more importantly most of the big bucks that are using a green field will be out in that green field early in the afternoon for 10 days after a full moon.

To learn more about Mark and Terry Drury and Drury Outdoors, visit http://www.druryoutdoors.com/.

For more bowhunting tips, check-out “Bowhunting Deer: The Secrets of the PSE Pros,” a new eBook for Amazon Kindle by John E. Phillips. You also can go to http://www.amazon.com/kindle-ebooks and type-in the name of the book to find it. Too, you can download a free Kindle app that enables you to read the book on your iPad, computer or SmartPhone.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Introducing the 2013 PSE X-FORCE™ DREAM SEASON® DNA™


2013 PSE Dream Season DNA

2013 PSE Dream Season DNA

Pre-Order Now From Your Local PSE Dealer!

When the Drurys challenged the engineers at PSE to design a lightweight, high performance hunting bow, it seemed impossible. Stripping down a current model or creating a bow that was too expensive for most hunters was not an option. Instead, PSE’s engineers set out to design a bow that was entirely different, all the way down to its DNA™. Introducing the Dream Season® DNA™ by PSE. Created by using a riser forged out of state-of-the-art, ultra-light and ultra-strong aluminum alloy, the new DNA™ weighs in at only 3.7 lbs. It features PSE’s new Center Pull technology that places the arrow in the exact center of the bow for unparalleled tuneability and exceptional performance. The amazing new Core™ cam produces speeds of up to 352 fps, has 5 inches of draw length adjustment on the inner-cam, and is incredibly smooth. The DNA™ also features the new Centerlock 2™ Limb Pockets, FleX™ Cable Slide, Backstop 2™ and all the other features you expect from PSE. The new Dream Season® DNA™ is not only the best hunting bow we’ve ever made…It’s the best hunting bow EVER made!

To find your local PSE Dealer, click here!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


2012 Dream Season EVO Bow Give Away!


Go to Facebook at www.facebook.com/OfficialPSEArchery and CLICK on the enter to win tab! Sweepstakes ends August 31st, 2012. Good luck! Sweepstakes rules apply. See the app page for more details at http://bit.ly/NmqjHf.

Come and visit us at www.pse-archery.com


Bow Madness premieres PrimeTime tonight at 9pm CST on Outdoor Channel!


Bow Madness premieres PrimeTime tonight at 9pm CST on Outdoor Channel

Bow Madness premieres PrimeTime tonight at 9pm CST on Outdoor Channel!

With mean PSE rigs, guts and every ounce of skill they have, the Drury Outdoors Team makes a mad dash across the continent to put a Rage in the cage and a buck in the back of the truck. These episodes hit hard and fast as the arrows we sling, and you get to sling some too. One of our fans’ hunts per week will air during the I Shot It With My PSE segment. At the end of the season, all of America will vote on their favorite, and the winner takes home a new Dream Season Edition HuntVe 4×4 electric UTV. It’s archery-only, adrenaline-always. With some of the best bowhunters on the planet.

Outdoor Channel Monday 5 p.m. CST, Wednesday 12:30 a.m. CST, Thursday 9 p.m. CST

 


PSE’s Terry Drury Says to Make Sure You Have Time to Set Up on Turkeys


Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note: PSE has asked nationally known outdoorsman Terry Drury to give us his tips and tactics for taking a wild turkeys with his PSE bow.

The only way you can know for sure where to set up your ground blind and your decoys is to locate the turkey ahead of time. You can do this by either finding his roost site before you hunt or see him out in a field or some type of open area before you hunt him. Once you see where the turkey should be, look for a spot where you can set up your ground blind and your decoys on the morning you want to hunt. Give yourself time to reach that place, get the blind set out and brushed in, the decoys set out and then be in the blind long before the turkey can see you. I believe that having the proper set up is 90 percent of what’s required to take a turkey with a bow. Be careful to not set up your decoy and blind, so that as soon as a turkey comes up out of a valley or a ditch he sees the decoy and the blind. Because then he’ll think, “What’s that? I’ve never seen it before. I’m out of here.” If possible, I prefer for a turkey to see the decoy and the blind when he’s out at 100 to 200 yards away. Then he won’t be startled. That’s why I like to set up around field edges, logging roads and young clear cuts, where the turkey can see the set up from a long way off. If the turkeys are close and gobbling really well, but we know we can pick up our blind and decoys and move 50 or 100 yards away without spooking the turkeys, we’ll often do that to get better video footage of turkeys coming in from a long ways off. If a turkey’s gobbling well, and we feel we have time to back up and make a better set up for a bow shot, we may move from 50 to 150 yards away from the turkey to make sure that bird has plenty of time to see the decoys and plenty of time for us to see him.

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Terry Drury’s Funniest Turkey Hunt:
One of the funniest turkey hunts that Mark and I have ever had, was when we were hunting turkeys in timber without a ground blind. I was sitting against a tree, and Mark was sitting against another – about 5 feet from me. Mark was the shooter, and I was running the video camera. But the way the gobbler came in, Mark was unable to get to full draw on the turkey. The turkey kept coming and walked right between Mark and I. We were so well camouflaged in our Mossy Oak, that the turkey never saw us, although he was only 2 feet from me and about 2 feet from Mark. This gobbler was really big, and we had to let him walk off. That bird just out turkeyed Mark, and me too.

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Terry Drury Says Don’t Forget to Check that Your Arrow Will Clear the Window


Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note:PSE has asked nationally known outdoorsman Terry Drury to give us his tips and tactics for taking a wild turkeys with his PSE bow.

Because I shoot from a chair when I’m hunting out of a ground blind, I want to make sure that when I aim at a turkey and release the arrow that the arrow won’t hit any of the sides of the window from which I’m shooting, if I’m shooting through a vertical window. If I’m shooting through a horizontal window, I need to look through my pin sight, aim at the decoy and see if the arrow will hit the bottom of the window. I may have to move my decoys to make sure I can get arrow clearance once I shoot. You also can put your turkey vest, your boots and/or your daypack in your seat and then sit on them. That should make you high enough to get arrow clearance.

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Terry Drury’s Calling Tactics:
Yesterday I told you how to call in a gobbler that had a flock of hens with him. But, sometimes, you’ll call in a flock of turkeys that has more than one gobbler in the flock, and all the gobblers may be longbeards. For instance one of the gobblers may be a dominant gobbler, and the other two birds will be subordinate gobblers. So, when Mark and I see there’s more than one gobbler in a flock, we change our calling strategy. Instead of trying to call in the dominant hen like we do when only one gobbler is in a flock, we start calling aggressively to the gobblers to attempt to pull one of those three longbeards out of the flock. So, knowing which turkeys in the flock you want to call to and to talk to when a flock of birds is coming to your decoy is very important to your success.

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

When the turkeys come in, you’ve got to look for a place to put the arrow. One of the worst shots to make is when a gobbler’s facing you, and you try and shoot him through the breast. A better shot is to wait for that gobbler to turn broadside to you and place the arrow about 3 inches back from the crease in the turkey’s wing. Or, if the turkey’s in full strut, wait for him to turn away from you. Put the arrow right at the base of his tail feathers in the anus area. That way, you can make the draw without the turkey seeing you, and your arrow will go through the vitals. But, Mark and I both prefer to take broadside shots, if we can get them.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Terry Drury Says to Make Sure You Have Time to Set Up on Turkeys

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Terry Drury Says to Always Have a Ground Blind When You Bowhunt Turkeys


Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note:PSE has asked nationally known outdoorsman Terry Drury to give us his tips and tactics for taking a wild turkeys with his PSE bow.

A ground blind gives you so much more opportunity to move your bow, without being seen, than if you don’t use a ground blind. When you get ready to come to full draw, you can make that move much easier, and the turkey’s much less likely to see you, when you’re in a ground blind. I like a total concealment ground blind, and Big Game Treestands just has come out with a new total concealment blind that I’m really like. Too, Mark and I have five new prototype blinds that we’re testing this turkey season. These new blinds have blackout on one side of the window curtains, which means you can leave the blackout side down for several days or weeks. Then the turkeys get accustomed to seeing those black spots in the blind.

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

When you roll the windows up, the inside of the blind is black, so the turkeys don’t see any difference in the way the blind appears with the windows down or the windows up. But, the windows are also reversible, so that if you prefer, you can have the camouflage side of the curtains facing out. These blinds from Big Game Treestands have vertical windows, which is much better for archers than horizontal windows are. I also like a total concealment blind, which enables you to stay out of the weather and breaks the wind. Too, you can move around in a ground blind, without the turkey seeing you. The blinds I hunt out of are big enough for a video camera and a cameraman, besides me. Another element I believe is important when you’re using a total concealment ground blind is to brush up the outside of the blind. We’ll put limbs, bushes and brush all around the blind, so the turkeys don’t just see a flat piece of material. When we go to a spot where we know there’s a turkey, we try to get there an extra 30 to 45 minutes early, so that we not only have time to set up the ground blind but also have time to brush up around the outside of the blind. You don’t have to spend a whole lot of time brushing up your blind, since once the turkey sees and focuses on the decoy, he’s really not that interested in the blind. This is one of the reasons you can use a pop up ground blind on a turkey, with a little bit of brush around it, and be ready to take that turkey. But, when you’re hunting a deer from a ground blind, you may have to leave that ground blind set up for a week or more and really brush up good around it.

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Terry Drury’s Calling Tip:
One of the toughest turkeys to take with a gun or a bow is a gobbler with hens. Often instead of trying to call the gobbler, we’ll forget about him and start calling to the boss hen in the flock. If she starts yelping and yelping aggressively, we’ll yelp even louder and more aggressively than she is. We’ll start calling on top of her calls, before she finishes those calls much like when a lady’s talking to a group of other ladies, and another lady in the group starts talking, while the first lady’s talking. That tactic usually makes both the ladies and the hens mad. We’re trying to make that hen so mad, that she wants to come over and scold us. If she starts coming toward us, we pour on the heat, calling louder and more aggressively than she’s calling. Then we can get her really mad by doing plenty of cutting and cackling. Wherever that boss hen goes, the rest of the flock, including the gobbler, will go. So, we allow that boss hen to drag the gobbler and the rest of the turkeys right in to our decoys and into bow range.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Terry Drury Says Don’t Forget to Check that Your Arrow Will Clear the Window

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Terry Drury Says to Check Your Range of Motion When Bowhunting Turkeys


Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note: PSE has asked nationally known outdoorsman Terry Drury to give us his tips and tactics for taking a wild turkeys with his PSE bow.

One of the things you always have to remember, when you’re using archery tackle to take turkeys, is that the turkeys don’t read the same books, articles, webpages and blogs that we hunters do. Many times, a tom turkey will do just the opposite of what he’s supposed to do. If you’re a left handed shooter, you’ll want to swing the bow to your right to aim at the turkey, and you’ll have a difficult time swinging your bow to your left, if a turkey comes in on that side to where you are. A right handed shooter easily can swing his bow to the left, but oftentimes has trouble swinging it to the right. So, when you’re sitting in your blind in a chair, you want to line up your butt and your feet, so that you can make that swing, easily and comfortably. Hopefully, you can set up to be in the right position to take the best shot when the gobbler arrives. I like to have my feet planted toward the left. Then I can swing my bow toward the right and be lined up perfectly to take the shot. Always practice drawing and shooting, before the turkey gets to the decoys. Then you’ll know you can get in the proper position to make the right shot, when the gobbler comes in, because turkeys rarely do what they’re supposed to do when they’re supposed to do it.

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Terry Drury’s Calling Tip:

I’m often asked how I call to a turkey, after I’ve set up my blind and set my decoys out. Mark and I believe in taking a turkey’s temperature right off the bat. Our technique of calling is best illustrated with a ladder. We like to start calling on the lower rungs of the ladder, with soft calling, low calling, soft yelps and some clucking and purring. If that turkey’s ready to breed, he’ll fire back immediately with a gobble. If he’s got hens or another gobbler with him, he usually won’t gobble back immediately. If the turkey is really gobbling well and starts coming toward us, we’ll probably call a little bit louder and somewhat more aggressively. We want to get that gobbler excited, so that he doesn’t get distracted or become uninterested. When that turkey is at 30 to 50 yards from the decoy, we start soft calling, purring on our M.A.D. calls and scratching the leaves. Or, perhaps we’ll give the sound of a turkey’s wing beating the ground. However, we mostly use soft clucking and purring to bring the gobbler within bow range.

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Also, remember to be patient. Don’t try and call too much. Watch the bird’s body language, and don’t rush the shot. If that turkey comes running in and is really locked in to your decoy, don’t call any more. Instead prepare to draw, and shoot, because that bird has bought what you’re selling. When he gets to your decoys, you need to be ready to collect him.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Terry Drury Says to Always Have a Ground Blind When You Bowhunt Turkeys

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Where to Put Your Turkey Decoy to Bowhunt with PSE’s Terry Drury


Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note: PSE has asked nationally known outdoorsman Terry Drury to give us his tips and tactics for taking a wild turkeys with his PSE bow.

One of the most critical elements for successfully harvesting a gobbler with a bow is decoy placement. I like to have the decoy 12 to 18 yards from my stand site. Depending on the time of the year, and whether you’re using a strutting gobbler decoy, a half strutting decoy, a jake or a hen decoy, I believe that the decoy either can help you or hurt you. But, the decoy always has to be really close to your blind when you’re bowhunting for turkeys. You have to take the turkey’s temperature to determine his emotional level at the time you’re hunting him to decide which decoy seems the best for hunting that particular turkey, that day. For instance, if you put a big strutting decoy out early in the season, and you call a gobbler in to where he can see that decoy, and that gobbler comes running in, then you’ve got the right decoy for that gobbler that day. However, if you put that big strutting decoy out in front of your blind, and you see that gobblers are shying away from him, then you may want to change decoys and use a decoy in half strut or use a jake decoy. Also, the heads of those two decoys generally aren’t as brightly colored as the head of a strutting decoy is. These more subordinate looking decoys often will lure in a gobbler that the full strut decoy may run off. During the peak of the breeding season, you may want to just use a hen decoy, perhaps one that’s squatted. Just make sure a gobbler can see that squatted hen decoy. So, learning to use your turkey decoys to match the time of the breeding season and the mood of the turkey you’re trying to take is very important to your success when you’re bowhunting toms.

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Hunting Turkeys with Drury Outdoors

Although you may be able to shoot accurately out to 40 yards, you still want that decoy to bring that wild turkey in as close as you can get him to your blind. That turkey gobbler may look as big as a lion, when he’s in full strut coming across the field. But remember that the vitals on a turkey are very small. The gobbler’s breast may look large, however, if you don’t put that broadhead in the vital area, there’s a really good chance that you will lose that turkey. Remember, if a turkey will come in within 30 yards of a decoy, then more than likely, he’ll come within 18 or 20 yards of the decoy, if you’ll just be patient. If you’re using a hen decoy, the gobbler may move in from behind her. But, if you’re using a jake, a half strutting or a full strut gobbler decoy, the turkey may come in side stepping toward the tom’s head. On a calm day with very little wind, the gobbler may circle the decoy and then try and flog the decoy.

Really, I don’t worry too much about which decoys to use, because I’m usually either hunting with Tad Brown or my brother, Mark, and I just use their decoys. We use the Flambeau decoys that are flocked. Often we’ll use a full strut decoy the first week and put the fan of a turkey we’ve harvested before in the back of that decoy, to make the decoy look more realistic. Then, after that first week of turkey season, I may use a half strut decoy, a jake decoy or a gobbler decoy that has a head that isn’t brightly painted and therefore looks more submissive. During the peak of the season, I’ll use a mounted hen decoy made by Hazel Creek. I bowhunt turkeys with my Dream Season EVO, a Rage turkey broadhead and PSE Bow Madness arrow shafts.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Terry Drury Says to Check Your Range of Motion When Bowhunting Turkeys

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Tracy Drury talks about the bond between Mark and his daughter Taylor


Mark and Taylor Drury are a father and daughter team from Drury Outdoors. Tracy Drury is Mark’s wife and Taylor’s mother. Tracy talks about the bond between Mark and his daughter Taylor.


Terry Drury: Why he shoots a PSE bow


Terry Drury with Drury Outdoors explains why he shoots PSE.

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Terry Drury Talks About Persistence



Terry Drury with Drury Outdoors Talks About Persistence

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Terry Drury – The deer that got away


Terry Drury with Drury Outdoors speaks about the deer that got away!

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


No Matter What Taylor Drury’s Future Holds, She’ll Still Be Outdoors


Taylor & Mark Drury - Drury Outdoors

Taylor & Mark Drury - Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note: Taylor Drury is the 16 year old daughter of Mark Drury of Drury Outdoors and the creator of M.A.D. Calls. Taylor can’t remember when she first started shooting a bow, but the family likes to joke that she was born with a bow in her hand. Taylor explains that, “I really like watching animals and enjoy shooting my bow and taking deer. Most of all, I enjoy the quality time I spend with my dad in the outdoors when we scout, put out cameras, plant green fields, and hunt together.” This week, we’ll learn more about Taylor, what hunting means to her, and why hunting is such a strong thread that’s woven through the fabric of the Drury family.

Taylor Drury: I’m often asked, “Taylor, what are you going to do when you grow up?” I guess that’s a question older people always ask teenagers, but honestly, I really don’t know. I do know that I’d like to work with my dad and my family in Drury Outdoors. Drury Outdoors is a family business, and I would really like to help carry on the family tradition that my dad and my uncle have created. I think a lot of how much I’ll be involved in the family business depends on where my dad is at in his life when I get out of college. I do have another interest though, because ever since I was a little kid, I’ve had an interest in going to medical school. If my career turns out to be something other than hunting and being in the outdoors, I know I will continue hunting and helping my dad as a hobby. I believe I’ll always hunt with my bow and want to be with my dad. However, I’m not really ready to make any plans as to what my career will be, until I get to the appropriate time to make a decision.

I think being in the woods and seeing a wide variety of animals is so much fun, and especially animals you don’t normally see in the city. If you don’t live on a farm, then you’ll rarely see a deer. But I think sitting in a blind or tree stand and seeing how deer react to different changes in the environment is cool. To be completely honest, the thing I love most about bowhunting and hunting in general is the time I get to spend with my dad. My dad is gone a lot because of work, but he’s doing what he loves to do. Unfortunately, he has to be away from our family quite a bit. Normally when he’s home, Dad and I hunt together. Hunting provides such a great time for fathers and daughters to bond. We’ve always had an interest in hunting together, and my dad has always found a way to make hunting fun for me. Usually, the most one on one time dad and I have together is when we hunt. Often my dad will be at the farm, and I’ll be at home going to school. So, when we do have time together in the outdoors, our adventures aren’t only about hunting, but also about our being together.

One of the great things about hunting with my dad is that when we go hunting, he’s always in a good mood. Dad isn’t into shopping, and he doesn’t really enjoy going out to eat either. My dad is an outdoorsman. The outdoors is where he works, and where he’s the happiest. When we’re hunting, my dad’s really happy, and it’s the time when we have the most fun together. So, to go back to the original question of how to get kids interested in hunting, why I’ve become a bowhunter and will I stay in hunting, the simple answer is that hunting gives me an opportunity to have fun with my dad, and for me, there’s nothing more important than that.

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Taylor Drury Talks about Her School, Friends and Bowhunting


Taylor Drury - Drury Outdoors

Taylor Drury - Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note: Taylor Drury is the 16 year old daughter of Mark Drury of Drury Outdoors and the creator of M.A.D. Calls. Taylor can’t remember when she first started shooting a bow, but the family likes to joke that she was born with a bow in her hand. Taylor explains that, “I really like watching animals and enjoy shooting my bow and taking deer. Most of all, I enjoy the quality time I spend with my dad in the outdoors when we scout, put out cameras, plant green fields, and hunt together.” This week, we’ll learn more about Taylor, what hunting means to her, and why hunting is such a strong thread that’s woven through the fabric of the Drury family.

Taylor Drury: Yesterday, I spoke about how my boyfriend and my dad spent two afternoons together in a tree stand. Sometimes people ask me if I’m going to teach Zac how to shoot a bow, but honestly, I don’t know. I think Zac may want to continue learning about hunting from behind a camera, before he tries to master a bow. He can learn much more about how and why we hunt from behind a camera than he can while shooting a bow. From behind the camera, he can better understand the effort and reasoning in planting green fields, scouting, putting out trail cameras, studying pictures and trying to determine which bucks we should or shouldn’t take in the coming season. And, after that, if he wants to learn to shoot a bow, we can start teaching him.

I know how to shoot a bow, and I feel like I can shoot a bow with a lot of confidence. I may be able to teach Zac, but if he wants to learn to shoot a bow, I’d prefer for my dad to teach him. My dad’s the best bowhunting instructor I’ve ever known. My dad is patient and knows exactly what and how to teach. I think my boyfriend will learn far more from my dad than he will from me. I’m not sure I have the patience to be a good teacher, but I know my dad has that patience. Zac has told me that after being in a tree stand with my dad, at some point he may like to harvest a deer.

Many of my friends don’t even know that I’m a bowhunter, or that I’m on television and in videos. We live in the city, where there seems to be two types of people, either hunters or PETA advocates. I don’t share with a lot of people at school that I hunt and am on television and in videos. A few boys at my school who have grown up hunting and watching our TV shows think I’m cool, because I know how to shoot a bow and take a deer. The guys interested in hunting are really interested in talking to me about how I hunt, and what I do on hunts. Most of my friends think it’s really cool that I’m an outdoors person and a bowhunter and get to hunt with my dad, especially since not many girls at my school hunt. But the subject of my hunting doesn’t come up much at school.

Tomorrow: No Matter What Taylor Drury’s Future Holds, She’ll Still Be Outdoors

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Bowhunting – The Way that Taylor Drury’s Dad, Mark Drury, and Boyfriend Got to Know Each Other


Taylor Drury & Zac

Taylor Drury & Zac

Editor’s Note: Taylor Drury is the 16 year old daughter of Mark Drury of Drury Outdoors and the creator of M.A.D. Calls. Taylor can’t remember when she first started shooting a bow, but the family likes to joke that she was born with a bow in her hand. Taylor explains that, “I really like watching animals and enjoy shooting my bow and taking deer. Most of all, I enjoy the quality time I spend with my dad in the outdoors when we scout, put out cameras, plant green fields, and hunt together.” This week, we’ll learn more about Taylor, what hunting means to her, and why hunting is such a strong thread that’s woven through the fabric of the Drury family.

Taylor Drury: I have one problem that I think other teenage girls probably have, and that is how to get a dad and a boyfriend to get along. My boyfriend Zac isn’t a hunter, and as everyone knows, my dad certainly is a hunter. My boyfriend doesn’t shoot a bow or a gun, and my dad does both. You can see how I would be worried about whether these two were going to get along or not. I wasn’t sure, but hoped that the fact that they were so different wasn’t going to be a major problem.

I took Zac up to the farm for the first time, so he could experience hunting, which of course is a major part of my life and my family’s life. At the time, I didn’t know it, but my dad wanted to get me on film taking a deer. My dad asked his cameraman, Joe, to film me, and then asked my boyfriend, Zac, if he’d be willing to go with him on a hunt. My dad wanted Zac to film him if he came across an opportunity to take a deer. This meant that my dad and my boyfriend, who didn’t really know each other, would be spending quite a few hours together in a tree. What was worse was that I wouldn’t be there to act as a buffer between them, and that was a scary thought. Before the hunt, my dad took Zac out in the woods, showed him how to run the camera, gave him an opportunity to practice running the camera and attempted to prepare him for what an afternoon in the tree stand would be like. I found out later that after spending two afternoons in the tree stand filming my dad, Zac really enjoyed seeing all the deer and had a great time with my dad. Although Zac didn’t grow up in a hunting family and had had no previous exposure to being out in the woods and around wildlife, he got a good taste of what I’ve always had the privilege to enjoy.

Zac and I had only been dating for about 7 months at that time, and to be honest, having my dad ask my boyfriend to help out felt somewhat awkward. That was the first time that Zac and my dad had spent any time together without my mom or me being present. I was really nervous about how things might turn out. My dad can be a real jokester, and he can come across as very sarcastic, but he’s only kidding. I was wondering to myself, “What if my dad says something very rude, and Zac doesn’t figure out that he’s just joking. Or, what if my dad says something that totally embarrasses me?” While I couldn’t help but worry about what might happen, I could rely on the fact that I knew my dad would introduce Zac to the experience of hunting. This was Zac’s first time in the woods, and I knew my dad would help him, since it was his first time out. I knew dad would explain a lot about hunting to Zac to help him understand what hunting and especially bowhunting involved. I was pretty relieved after the first hunt when Zac told me that he had had a really good time, and that he had learned a lot from my dad. I knew that during their time together, things could have turned out badly between my dad and Zac, but I also realize that whoever I date has to be okay with my parents.

After Zac and my dad spending two afternoon hunts together and getting along well, Zac and I now can make more trips to the farm during hunting season. Too, if I’m hunting and being filmed, now I know that Zac will have a really good time running the camera for dad. From this experience, I’ve learned that my dad’s idea of his taking my boyfriend hunting wasn’t a bad idea. I also think that the relationship Zac and dad have built from two afternoons in a tree stand together have helped each of them get to know each other better, and also makes things better for me.

Tomorrow: Taylor Drury Talks about Her School, Friends and Bowhunting

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


A Dad and a Buck for Taylor Drury to Remember


 Taylor & Mark Drury - Drury Outdoors

Taylor & Mark Drury - Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note: Taylor Drury is the 16 year old daughter of Mark Drury of Drury Outdoors and the creator of M.A.D. Calls. Taylor can’t remember when she first started shooting a bow, but the family likes to joke that she was born with a bow in her hand. Taylor explains that, “I really like watching animals and enjoy shooting my bow and taking deer. Most of all, I enjoy the quality time I spend with my dad in the outdoors when we scout, put out cameras, plant green fields, and hunt together.” This week, we’ll learn more about Taylor, what hunting means to her, and why hunting is such a strong thread that’s woven through the fabric of the Drury family.

Taylor Drury: Last year, I took the best bow buck I’ve ever taken. However, this wasn’t the first time I’d drawn my bow on this deer. We named the buck, Chief Tricks, because every time I’d get a shot, just before I could release the arrow, he’d run away. My dad had taken me to one of the favorite fields we’ve planted and named, Hourglass. Relatively early in the day, there still was plenty of daylight. We saw two other deer, and then we saw Chief Tricks, coming out from the side, 10 yards from my stand. One thing I’ve learned is that settling in to take a shot at a deer is much harder than settling in to take a shot at target archery in the backyard. My nerves immediately go crazy when I see a deer to shoot. My heart starts pumping fast, and when I start to make my draw, I feel like I’m pulling a 100 pound bow. But I’m always able to pull my Chaos to full draw, and I always remember what my dad has taught me about how to follow through after the release. I’ve had so much practice with the Chaos that I have a tremendous amount of confidence in my bow. I’ve learned that with my Chaos, I don’t have to think about my bow. All I have to do is keep my form and go through my shooting sequence, and the bow will do its job. This time when Chief Tricks came in, I made my draw, went through my shooting sequence, released the arrow and knew I had a good hit.

After seeing Chief Tricks stand still for a moment and then run off, we climbed down out of the tree stand and started tracking the buck. We had a good blood trail on Chief Tricks, so I knew I had double lunged him. We found him about 50  or 60 yards away. Seeing that buck with those horns gave me an amazing feeling. I was almost surprised that my Chaos at low poundage could take down this monster buck. Chief Tricks scored 140 on the Pope & Young scale. Every time I take a deer with my bow, when I finally get to that deer, there’s a level of excitement that makes me want to do it all over again to find that same joy.

I also enjoy the effort my dad and I put in together when we prepare green fields, put out cameras, and study the pictures of the wildlife. Before the season opens, we like to watch deer from a blind. And all of our hard work comes together when either of us gets to take a buck with our PSE bows. For me, taking that buck with my Chaos was one of the major accomplishments in my life, especially at 16 years old. I also feel really special to have a dad who invests so much time in teaching me how to shoot accurately. Knowing that my dad has confidence in my ability to shoot, and then finally taking a deer with my bow, is one of my favorite things.

Tomorrow: Bowhunting – The Way That Taylor Drury’s Dad, Mark Drury, and Boyfriend Got to Know Each Other

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Building a Relationship and a Sport for a Lifetime with PSE Bows – Taylor Drury


Taylor Drury - Drury Outdoors

Taylor Drury - Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note: Taylor Drury is the 16 year old daughter of Mark Drury of Drury Outdoors and the creator of M.A.D. Calls. Taylor can’t remember when she first started shooting a bow, but the family likes to joke that she was born with a bow in her hand. Taylor explains that, “I really like watching animals and enjoy shooting my bow and taking deer. Most of all, I enjoy the quality time I spend with my dad in the outdoors when we scout, put out cameras, plant green fields, and hunt together.” This week, we’ll learn more about Taylor, what hunting means to her, and why hunting is such a strong thread that’s woven through the fabric of the Drury family.

Taylor Drury: I’ve been shooting a PSE bow for about 3 years and I really love the PSE Chaos, because it’s comfortable, it fits me really well, and the bow isn’t too heavy to handle with ease. The Chaos is quiet, crazy fast and is easy for me to draw and shoot. My Chaos is so fast that I don’t have to shoot a heavy draw length to be at the legal limit for the arrow to pass all the way through a deer.

The first deer I took with my PSE Chaos was a doe, and since then I’ve taken two bucks. In my opinion, the Chaos is one of the best bows for young archers available on the market today. I’m not a weight lifter, so my arms aren’t overly strong. I shoot at a light weight, but there’s still enough weight to get a total pass through a deer, especially at close ranges. The Chaos is just right for the range I shoot.

I can’t remember when I first started going into the outdoors with my dad. But, I think my first memory is of my dad scouting and carrying me on his back when I was 3  or 4 years old. I guess it was before turkey season started, because Dad would stop, make some turkey calls and listen for turkeys. My dad would let me use his calls to try and call the turkeys. When deer season was about to come in, we’d go out riding in our vehicle at night looking for deer. Dad taught me to use his binoculars and also what to look for when scouting for deer. When I got a little older, my dad would let me go with him, and we’d sit in a blind and look for deer together. Although I was interested in looking at deer when we first started going, pretty soon into our adventure, I’d get disinterested. Dad brought plenty of snacks and portable games for me to play with in the blind, while he was watching for deer. Dad also would bring a blanket to keep me warm and allow me to go to sleep if I wanted. Dad made sure I didn’t get bored and brought along enough items to keep me interested. If I did get bored or tired, I could go to sleep, until the time came to go home.

I’m asked a lot, “What’s the secret to getting a young person to want to go hunting?” I think the first key is to make sure that your daughter or son will enjoy the time you spend together. Don’t have unrealistic expectations of what the child is capable of doing. Most children aren’t going to be able to sit quietly for long periods of time in a blind. Remember that the child will want to do things that are fun for them and will hold their attention. If you’ll give your child the opportunity to try things they can be successful at, then they’ll want to keep trying new things. Many girls want to be with their dads anyway, so if they can be together and have fun, the child will want to go another time as well.

I think one of the big mistakes that dads often make with their children is they make their children go hunting whether they want to or not. Since I’ve grown up in a hunting family, I’ve always been interested in what my family does when they go out in the woods. I’ve always wanted to go with my dad, and I’ve never turned down an opportunity for us to be together. But we haven’t just spent time sitting in the blind. We’ve played games, and he has made hunting fun. For instance, when we’d go out scouting when I was younger, he would say, “Taylor, let’s make a bet on how many deer we’re going to see this afternoon.” When we would look at the pictures taken from the camera, he’d ask me how big I thought the deer were, and that too became a game. Dad really built my interest, not only in hunting, but in everything to do with the wild. Dad created as many games as he could that he and I could play together that related to hunting, archery, wildlife management and nature in general. I think that’s the real secret of starting a young person out hunting. Make it fun for them, have plenty of snacks and always have such a good time that they’ll want to go back out again with you.

Tomorrow: A Dad and a Buck for Taylor Drury to Remember

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


What’s in the Future for PSE’s Mark Drury?


Taylor & Mark Drury - Drury Outdoors

Taylor & Mark Drury - Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note: Why would a daddy teach his daughter to hunt, and what are the benefits? This week, we’ll learn the answers to these questions and more from PSE’s Mark Drury of Drury Outdoors, a nationally known turkey caller and deer and turkey hunter. You’ll be surprised what you’ll learn about why every father should get his daughter into hunting.

Question: Mark, what’s hunting with Taylor like now that she’s a teenager?

Drury: Taylor’s much more fun to hunt with now than when she was a little girl. She really wants to succeed as a bowhunter. Taylor gets so much more excited now than she did when she was little, and she cries with excitement when she takes a deer.

Question: Mark, yesterday you told us about taking Taylor’s boyfriend, Zac, hunting with you. Why would you advise other dads who hunt to take their daughters’ boyfriends hunting with them?

Drury: You never know what you’ll learn. By taking Zac hunting, everything I found out was all good. I’m very pleased with Taylor dating Zac, because I’ve learned he’s a really good man. I feel like Zac and I have begun to bond a little.

Question: What did Taylor ask about when you took Zac hunting?

Drury: She asked me 50 million questions, “What did he say to you? What did you say to him?” But, at the end of the day, I really believe that she felt the experience was good for her, for Zac and for me. After getting to know Zac on the hunt, I’m really proud of this young man she’s decided to date.

Question: Mark, what’s in the future for you and Taylor?

Drury: Hopefully, a lot more hunting together. However, Taylor has college staring her in the face in one year, and I’m worried about how much time we’ll have to hunt together. When girls go to college, other things become more important than hunting with dad. But, I still believe that Taylor will carve out a few weekends for us to hunt together. I believe Taylor and I will always spend time in the outdoors together, but I feel sure that once she starts to college, we’ll have less time than in the past to hunt together.

Question: What do you think about the possibility of Taylor coming into the family business and becoming a bigger part of Drury Outdoors?

Drury: We’ll have to see when that time comes, and when Taylor decides what she wants to do. If that’s what she wants to do, we’ll try to find a place for her in Drury Outdoors. I feel like hunting and especially bowhunting have created a strong bond between us. I don’t think that bond ever will go away as long as we live, and I look forward to many hunting seasons in our future. One thing that has always been 100 percent with Taylor is that when she squeezes a trigger on a mechanical release or on a rifle, she’s dead on. I’ve never seen Taylor miss with a rifle, and she only has missed one deer with her bow and never missed a turkey. She’s an incredible shot.

Question: What are you the most proud of about Taylor as a hunter?

Drury: Her ability to close the deal when she’s got the shot.

Question: Since Taylor was brave enough to bring Zac to meet and hunt with you, if she has other boyfriends, do you think she will be brave enough to bring them to hunt with you too?

Drury: I think she will, because I believe it’s important to Taylor to know what I think about them.

Question: What’s in the future for Drury Outdoors?

Drury: Well, Terry and I aren’t getting any younger. But Terry’s son, Matt, is doing a fantastic job managing the business. So, we’re going to continue to entertain the outdoor public with good DVDs, Internet content and TV shows, and we want to continue to expand our business. We’re finishing up the best year our company ever has had in a tough economy, and we plan to continue to grow the business.

Question: How did you and Terry develop Drury Outdoors as a family business?

Drury: The business just kind of happened. We believe in family, and Terry and I both know that we can always trust our family. Terry and I both believe it’s the best family business there is, but we may be a little partial.

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.

Next week: Hunting from Taylor’s perspective.


PSE’s Mark Drury on Getting to Know His Daughter’s Boyfriend through Hunting


Taylor & Mark Drury - Drury Outdoors

Taylor & Mark Drury - Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note: Why would a daddy teach his daughter to hunt, and what are the benefits? This week, we’ll learn the answers to these questions and more from PSE’s Mark Drury of Drury Outdoors, a nationally known turkey caller and deer and turkey hunter. You’ll be surprised what you’ll learn about why every father should get his daughter into hunting.

Question: Mark, what happened when boys started coming around to see Taylor?
Drury: Taylor is dating a young man named Zac. When Taylor brought Zac to the farm to go hunting for the first time, I told her, “We’re way down in the number of deer we’ve taken on video for Drury Outdoors. We’ve got to take more deer, so I need at least two people hunting and two people videoing. I’ll take a nice buck, and you can take a nice buck. I’ll send you out with Joe Foster, (who has been my cameraman for 3 years), and I’ll take Zac with me. I’ll teach Zac how to run a camera. Zac can sit in a tree and film me hunting. We really need to hunt this way this weekend.” Taylor didn’t act like she minded having her boyfriend hunt with me, and I think she knew that I’d spend enough time with him, so he’d feel comfortable running a camera.

Question: What was spending an afternoon with your daughter’s boyfriend like?
Drury: I had a lot of fun with Zac. At first, he didn’t know the difference between a camera and a rabbit.

Question: What did you learn about Zac when you two were in the tree together?
Drury: I learned that he got very nervous every time we saw a deer. I also learned that he was a good forward thinker, and that he had a good eye for the camera. Zac did really well, and I think he is a sharp young man. But, I need to clear something up. When Zac and I went on our first deer hunt, we didn’t get in a tree stand, we went to a box blind.

Question: What was going on in the blind when you weren’t seeing deer?
Drury: We were both texting Taylor and aggravating her. Zac would text her, “Your dad told me some things I never knew about you.” Then, I would text her and say, “You won’t believe what Zac just said.” Zac and I were both driving Taylor crazy, because we wouldn’t explain what we were texting to her. We aggravated the tar out of her, and she took all the kidding hook, line and sinker.

Question: What did Taylor think when you decided to take him out the second day with you?
Drury: By then, she thought it was all good, but I’ve got to tell you what I did. As I mentioned earlier, Taylor’s not a morning person, so I let both her and Zac sleep late. The next morning when Joe and I went out to hunt, Taylor was in her room, and Zac was in the lower sleeping quarters. Before daylight, I took one of my trail cameras, hid it on the banister and pointed it straight at Taylor’s room. When I came back and checked the camera, I had a picture of Taylor coming out of her room and headed to the bathroom. She got up again at 8:20 am and went to the bathroom. At 10:15 am, I got a picture of Zac peeking in her room to see if she was awake. She finally woke up and came out of her room at 10:30 am. So Dads, I want you to know that you can use trail cameras to monitor teenagers, just like you use trail cameras to monitor deer. I showed Zac and Taylor the pictures and said, “You two never know where I’m going to hang a trail camera.”

Tomorrow: What’s in the Future for PSE’s Mark Drury?

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Deer Hunting and Deer Management – A Family Activity for PSE’s Mark Drury and His Daughter Taylor


Taylor Drury - Drury Outdoors

Taylor Drury - Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note: Why would a daddy teach his daughter to hunt, and what are the benefits? This week, we’ll learn the answers to these questions and more from PSE’s Mark Drury of Drury Outdoors, a nationally known turkey caller and deer and turkey hunter. You’ll be surprised what you’ll learn about why every father should get his daughter into hunting.

Question: Mark, what do the other hunters think when you bring your daughter to hunting camp?
Drury: They love having Taylor in hunting camp. Anywhere we’ve ever hunted, she has always been welcomed. One of the things I’m most proud of about Taylor is that she always fits in great with everyone.

Question: What’s the worst problem you’ve had with Taylor about hunting?
Drury: Taylor is hard to wake up in the morning, and she doesn’t like to get up early for the morning hunt. That’s really the only problem that Taylor and I have had with hunting, and I have overcome the problem. Now, I usually hunt in the mornings by myself or with others, and Taylor and I hunt together in the afternoons. We seldom, if ever, hunt in the mornings together. I quit fighting that battle of trying to get her up. If she wants to sleep in, it’s no longer a big deal. I take my own advice in that when you take your daughter hunting, the hunting needs to be fun for her. Let her hunt the way she wants to hunt, instead of trying to force her to hunt the way you want to hunt.

Question: What PSE bow does Taylor shoot, and why?
Drury: Taylor shoots a PSE Chaos bow and pulls 36 pounds at a draw length of 24 inches. The Chaos delivers the most kinetic energy that she can get in a youth bow. More importantly, she loves that bow.

Question: What arrow and broadhead is she shooting, and why?
Drury: Taylor shoots a Carbon Force 100 Shaft arrow with a Magnus Stinger broadhead and the Rage 40KE broadhead.

Question: Mark, does Taylor scout with you before the season?
Drury: She sure does. Taylor likes to get all the cameras out, get them organized, and make sure they all have batteries and are working properly. When we go to put the cameras out, she likes to drive the 4 wheeler and drop me off, so I can hang the cameras. After the season, Taylor loves to go shed hunting. Taylor and I participate in many deer management activities besides just hunting. However, when the time comes to plow and plant the food plots, Taylor disappears. But, the rest of the year, she’s ready to go with me anytime I want to go. When she was little, Taylor loved to ride the tractor with me when I would plant the green fields, but I’m afraid she’s outgrown that. Her life is changing, she’s got her friends and her boyfriend, and I’m not the only man her life anymore.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Mark Drury on Getting to Know His Daughter’s Boyfriend through Hunting

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Mark Drury on His Daughter Taylor’s First Deer


Taylor Drury - Drury Outdoors

Taylor Drury - Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note: Why would a daddy teach his daughter to hunt, and what are the benefits? This week, we’ll learn the answers to these questions and more from PSE’s Mark Drury of Drury Outdoors, nationally known turkey caller and deer and turkey hunter. You’ll be surprised what you’ll learn about why every father should get his daughter into hunting.

Question: Mark, how old was Taylor when she graduated from target shooting to actual hunting in the woods?

Drury: Taylor took her first deer with a gun when she was 8 years old, but she didn’t take a deer with a bow until she was 12 years old. Taylor’s first bow kill was a 3 year old buck with a 105 inch rack. We practiced all summer until Taylor could pull and shoot 30 pounds on her bow. I attached a cut on contact Magnus Stinger broadhead on the front of her arrow shaft, and I told her that she couldn’t take a shot unless the deer came within 15 yards. When the buck came within 9 yards, Taylor smoked that shot and that buck. She was so excited and started crying, and I got excited and started crying. We got the whole hunt on video. That was one of my greatest hunts ever. Taylor has taken a deer every year with her bow since she was 12 years old, and this past year (2011) she took a really nice buck.

Question: Mark, what do you tell other dads about teaching their daughters how to bowhunt?

Drury: The number one question I get through emails and that people at consumer shows ask is, “How do I get my daughter into bowhunting?” Here are the three keys:

* Start her target shooting when she’s really young.

* Never push her. Don’t force your daughter to go shoot when she doesn’t want to do that.

* Always make shooting the bow fun. Make it fun for her age, not for your age. If she wants to take an iPod and play games, let her do it. If she wants to shoot pumpkins, let her shoot pumpkins. If she wants to shoot balloons, let her shoot balloons. Just make it a game. But then when she wants to take a deer, make sure she understands how to do that.

Question: Mark, what did Taylor say when she walked up to that first buck she took with her bow?

Drury: Taylor was so excited and also surprised that the deer was as big as it was. When Taylor took her first deer with a gun, she was taking dance classes at the time. She was so excited that she started doing cartwheels. I was just as excited, and I did a cartwheel too. I wanted Taylor to know that I was just as excited as she was about her taking her first deer. I believe that Taylor and I are as close as a father and daughter can be, because of all the fun we’ve had in the outdoors together. Each year, Taylor and I probably hunt around 30 or 40 days together.

Question: When you and Taylor are on the stand together, what do y’all discuss?

Drury: Lately, we talk about boyfriends more than anything else.

Tomorrow: Deer Hunting and Deer Management – A Family Activity for PSE’s Mark Drury and His Daughter Taylor 

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Mark Drury Tells How He’s Taught His Daughter Taylor to Love Bowhunting


 Taylor Drury - Drury Outdoors

Taylor Drury - Drury Outdoors

Editor’s Note: Why would a daddy teach his daughter to hunt, and what are the benefits? This week, we’ll learn the answers to these questions and more from PSE’s Mark Drury of Drury Outdoors, a nationally known turkey caller and deer and turkey hunter. You’ll be surprised what you’ll learn about why every father should get his daughter into hunting.

Question: Mark, why did you teach Taylor to hunt?

Drury: From the day Taylor was born, I looked forward to taking her hunting with me. I wanted to introduce Taylor to my world, because most little girls are involved in their mothers’ worlds while the dad is gone. I wanted to know Taylor better and her to know my world. My brother Terry and I put Taylor in a tree stand with me when she was about 5 years old. Before we left the house, Tracy, my wife, told us, “Whatever you do, don’t put Taylor up a tree.” Knowing we were lying, we promised, “Oh, we won’t.” Terry helped me get Taylor up the tree, and she climbed the tree pretty well with my help; then she sat in my lap all afternoon. But, late in the evening when the time came to climb down out of the tree, Taylor was having a little bit of a problem. Terry was in the tree with us filming, and I told him, “I’ll go down the tree first, then you just drop her down to me, and I’ll catch her.” So, I got out of the tree, and Terry leaned over and dropped Taylor down to me. She only dropped about 5 feet. As soon as I caught her, Taylor said, “Daddy I want to do it again; let me climb up the tree.” But, I told her that we’d better go home. Our plan was to keep everything a secret from my wife Tracy, but when she found out what we had done, Tracy wouldn’t talk to me. However, she didn’t stay mad very long, she never does. The first time Taylor ever called in turkeys, she was wearing her red Sunday Easter dress with a white bow in her hair. We were on our family farm, and she was using a pushbutton call. When she started calling, three gobblers came storming in, and Taylor loved that excitement. Taylor has been in the outdoors with me a lot. Every chance I get to take Taylor with me, I load her up and take her to the woods.

Question: When did you start Taylor shooting a bow?

Drury: When she was about 5 years old. I think one of the reasons that Taylor likes to bowhunt now is that I’ve always made shooting the bow fun for her. Although I let Taylor shoot at a lot of different items, balloons were always her favorite. If she could hit a balloon and see and hear it pop, she would really get excited. I’ve blown up so many balloons for her, that sometimes I would feel like I was practically hyperventilating. The more accurately she shot, the smaller the size of balloons I would blow up. Before long, at 20 yards, Taylor could bust a balloon about the size of a softball with her bow.

Question: When Taylor was first shooting her bow, how long would each session last?

Drury: She’d shoot until I got tired of blowing up balloons. I never had to twist her arm to go shoot balloons.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Mark Drury on His Daughter Taylor’s First Bow Deer

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


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