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Maximum “Effective” Shooting Distance by PSE’s Jared Bloomgren


By Jared Bloomgren

www.facebook.com/jaredbloomgren

This is another one of those touchy subjects with many. It often turns into “I can shoot farther than you” conversation that turns to arguments at times.  Even worse when you start throwing in the talk about animal distances!

This is what it comes down to and it is as simple as this. Your maximum effective shooting distance is that distance in which you are comfortable and can consistently put  your arrows in a group one after another repeatedly.  For some this is 40 yards and for others it may be 90. Keep in mind this is not shooting at live targets during hunting conditions per say!!

Shooting from various positions is important....

Shooting from various positions is important….

“So what do you need to do to increase your maximum effective range?”  It all comes down to one word…….PRACTICE! And then more practice, practice, and practice! Try not to use an excuse that it is too hot or cold out, it is too windy, it is too wet, it is raining, etc…you get the picture. Sure there has to be limits but by shooting in as many adverse weather conditions as you can will also increase your shooting capability and confidence. Having confidence in your shooting and your equipment is very important and this can only be gained by shooting as often as possible.

When I first started shooting over 25+ years ago I started shooting at 10 yards and over time my range increased to 20, 30, 40, 50, etc…As I became more confident in my equipment and myself I began to stretch that distance to 110, 120, etc…Granted this didn’t happen overnight or over a year or two. I am still brushing up on my shooting today and I feel as if I can never be as good of a archer as I want to be!

A practice that I like to do at times is shoot an arrow at my target and run to that target, grab my arrow and run back immediately picking up my bow and shooting another arrow. Sometimes I do this while shooting up or down a hill as well to mimic the effects of being short of breathe as if I had to get up a hill quick to make a shot. As I get better I start to move the target farther away.

I am to the point today that I usually practice at ranges greater than 80 yards. This makes those 50 yard shots feel like chip shots and those 30 yard shots a slam dunk! So what is my maximum effective shooting range? Right now I would say that it is 120 yards but can stretch that out to 140 yards but I lose a bit of confidence after 120 yards. I can assure you that I will continue to improve on that! Remember, this is while target shooting.

Light levels can change....

Light levels can change….

Another thing that makes this type of shooting possible is by having a flat shooting, fast performing bow. That makes the Omen Pro and Max my favorite bows to date because of their raw performance. The shorter brace height has never been an issue for me either. Having great form makes these longer shots possible and longer shooting will actually improve your form. Why? Because a minor flaw in form at 30 yards may mean a 2” change in point of impact. A minor flaw in form at 100 yards can mean a foot or more! Longer shots force you to improve and keep your form consistent. Longer shots compound minor flaws in form and this makes you become a better shot and archer. Shooting from various positions is also important. Standing (even and uneven ground), sitting in various positions, with various types of clothing, different angles, etc…again, you get the point. Mimic as many various shooting positions and situations you can.

Now to what everyone is wondering. You wouldn’t dare shoot at an animal at 120 yards would you?! Well that all depends…..More than likely not but I will shoot at and kill animals at longer yardages than most archers would even think about shooting.  Again, why? Because of my practice that I have done and the confidence I have in myself and my gear!  120 yards is not a shot I have ever done and do not plan to because I like the challenge of getting in close as I can for a shot!  With that being said the animal’s behavior, body position, and weather conditions do come into play for each shot. An animal that has no idea I am there and is completely relaxed will allow a farther shot than an animal that is alert and nervous. Every condition has its place and many do not have a place for a shot at all. Keep in mind that I will never loosen an arrow on an animal that I know will not make a good clean ethical kill shot! We should all have that same belief in our mind at all times.

Elevated shots are important....

Elevated shots are important….

The greatest archer of all is the one who knows his limitations.

Only you can answer what your maximum shooting range is. It will depend directly on your level of confidence and capability directly related to practice and the shooting you make yourself take part in. Maximum shooting distance on a live animal in a hunting situation takes on many variables that also, only you can decide on.

So what are you waiting for?! Get out there and practice and brush up on your skills! I challenge you to start practicing at longer distances. You will be happy you did! It will increase your maximum shooting range guaranteed!

Jared “J-Rod” Bloomgren is a hardcore Do-It-Yourself bowhunter who strives to better himself each year in the outdoor community. As a professional hunter, freelance writer and photographer, he likes to relive his outdoor adventures through written expression and photography making the reader feel as if they were along on the hunt. He attributes much of his success to the vital education he has learned from the various big game animals that he hunts. He is quoted as saying, “In each and every hunt, success or defeat, I learn something from every outing and that I can put in my arsenal of knowledge to use at a later date, a later date that will again put my wits against that of my prey.”

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


My Bow Choice by PSE’s Jared Bloomgren


By Jared Bloomgren

I am often asked what makes me decide which bow is best for me. Ever since I began shooting my first PSE nearly 25 years ago I always looked forward to the next year when the new bows were introduced. It was always like Christmas in October when PSE would introduce the new bows and that hasn’t changed one bit today! I always look forward to what PSE will bring out for new bows and technology. This last October was no different! It has came a long ways since I was shooting my PSE Deer Hunter.

I decided to give the DNA a try and I have finally gotten my hands on my own. I have only shot the DNA at 20 yards in an indoor range so I cannot say for sure how I feel about the bow at longer distances. But when I have shot it, it has felt and shot like a dream bow. Smooth draw, vibe free, and very fast. Accuracy and forgiveness will have to be determined after I get it back. I have stripped my DNA down and sent it off to Hydro-Dip in Utah to have it dipped in the new Kryptek Highlander pattern! Once I have it back in my hands and get it put back together you can expect I will be out there shooting this bow out past 100 yards to determine if it will take the place of my Omen.

DNA fresh out of the box!

DNA fresh out of the box!

Okay, I got a bit sidetracked; back to it….what makes me decide which bow is best for me? I am a spot and stalk hunter as you know if you have been following my blogs. I hunt in the west in open country often and having a bow that is fast and forgiving is what I prefer. There are times when a 70 yard shot may present itself and having a flatter, faster shooting bow can make a huge difference. Granted speed doesn’t kill but it does sure help with these circumstances! Having a faster and flatter shooting bow will make judging yardage not as critical. This also increases my maximum effective shooting range. (Watch for a future blog on Maximum Shooting Range)

Ever since the introduction of the X Force HF in 2007 I was very excited! The speed and shoot-ability of this bow was better than ever in the PSE line. Since then the X Force line has continued with new bows over the years and there is an X Force for every style of archer. The speeds are phenomenal and yes, the shoot ability is top notch!

That brings me into the year 2012. I acquired an Omen Pro, black riser with skullworks limbs and accessories. The thing looks saweet! The black and skullworks combination just pops! I was pulling 74# and shooting a 390 grain arrow around 330 feet per second. I was drilling the bulls-eye out to 120 yards and very confident in my shooting and in the bow! I have never shot another bow as good as I am shooting this bow. The thing is a dream for me to shoot!

Omen Pro

Omen Pro

So that leads me back to the DNA. Will the DNA stack up to my Omen Pro? Time and testing will soon tell and I will keep everybody up to speed on my findings. Granted, what bow shoots best for me and what I prefer will not be the case for others. Each person needs to find the bow that compliments them. The Omen Pro has worked great for me and I look forward to trying out other bows as well. I hope to get my hands on an Omen Max too and I assume that will be just like the Omen Pro with a few refinements that I am sure will shoot just as great!

Another all time favorite bow of mine has been my 2012 Revenge. This thing is short and shoots incredibly well. I used it to hunt turkeys last spring and it will likely let the air out of a few more thunder chickens this spring! I would have to put my Revenge right behind my Omen Pro as far as shoot ability and accuracy. The Omen Pro had the edge over the Revenge as the Revenge just doesn’t have the speed and accuracy of the Omen Pro out to farther distances.

2012 Revenge

2012 Revenge

I will do another blog in the future about the DNA and what I think of it. I am pretty confident that it will be what I like in a bow as it is lighter and that would really help in my backcountry hunts. Saving every bit of weight on these hard to do hunts will help out a great deal. As a backcountry hunter I am always looking to shave weight somewhere. But the biggest question remains. Will I be able to shoot the DNA as well as the Omen? Time will tell and I will share my finding with you in the near future! Watch for a one of a kind DNA coming your way!

Jared “J-Rod” Bloomgren is a hardcore Do-It-Yourself bowhunter who strives to better himself each year in the outdoor community. As a professional hunter, freelance writer and photographer, he likes to relive his outdoor adventures through written expression and photography making the reader feel as if they were along on the hunt. He attributes much of his success to the vital education he has learned from the various big game animals that he hunts. He is quoted as saying, “In each and every hunt, success or defeat, I learn something from every outing and that I can put in my arsenal of knowledge to use at a later date, a later date that will again put my wits against that of my prey.”

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


What the Future Holds for PSE’s Christopher Perkins


PSE's Christopher Perkins

PSE’s Christopher Perkins

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. How did he do it, and what has he learned that can help you become a target archer and bowhunter? (Perkins enjoys both sports.)

Question: What’s in the future for you?

Perkins: I’ve got the World Championships next year in Germany. I won it last year, and I’ll go back to try to defend the title. That tournament pays right around $11,000 if you win it. I’ve got to go to Ogden, Utah, in a couple of weeks to shoot Stage Three for the World Cup.

Question: How long do you think you can stay this proficient in target archery?

Perkins: Hopefully a few years. I want to shoot as long as I can. I’m certainly not going to be giving it up in the next little bit. I want to try to perfect my shooting skills. I’m not perfect, that’s for sure. I think I’ve got a long way to go, and I’m going to continue to try to get better.

Question: What do you think would be required for you to become a perfect archer?

Perkins: There’s a lot more tournaments that I need to win. I’m not the best archer I can be yet, and I know that, and it’s going to take some years and some experience for me to continue to get better.

Question: When will you decide that you’re the best archer you can be?

Perkins: I know I’ve got some years ahead of me in shooting. I know I’ve got to compete in more international events and more big tournaments, and I know that I’ve got to win more than what I’ve won in the past.

Question: How will you know when you’ve become a perfect archer?

Perkins: I don’t think archery is a sport that you can be perfect at, although you strive for perfection every time you shoot. You can be a good archer, but you can’t be perfect at it. There’s always going to be mistakes, and there always will be room for improvement. But for me, I don’t have a goal of becoming the perfect archer. My goal is to strive to become the perfect archer, and I think that’s what all the competitive archers do. We’re all running the race to try to reach a finish line that we know we never can reach, but it’s in the striving, the trying, the working and continuing to try to improve and reduce the number of mistakes we make that we have a chance to become the best archers we ever can be.

Question: How does target archery fit into your bowhunting?

Perkins: Target archery fits perfectly into my bowhunting, because archery competitions are primarily held in the spring and summer, and our hunting season in Canada doesn’t start until October. All the competitive shooting is basically over by then, at least for me, so after the tournament archery season is over, I’m tuned up, my bows are tuned up, and I’m ready to go hunting. And, remember, I started shooting target archery so that I could become a better bowhunter, and I think that these sports complement each other. If you want to be a better bowhunter, become a better target archer.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Christopher Perkins Wins the Gold Cup


PSE's Christopher Perkins

PSE’s Christopher Perkins

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. How did he do it, and what has he learned that can help you become a target archer and bowhunter? (Perkins enjoys both sports.)

Question: Christopher, where was the Gold Cup held?

Perkins: Bloomingfield, New Jersey.

Question: How many contestants were in your division?

Perkins: There were only 10 or 12 of us, so it wasn’t a very big shoot.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.

Question: How far were you shooting?

Perkins: We were shooting at 70 meters. Normally we shoot at 50 meters, and I don’t understand why they had us at 70. The shoot has gotten to be a smaller shoot, not nearly as big as it has been in the past.

Question: How many times did you miss the center of the target?

Perkins: I missed the dot 5 times out of 72 arrows.

Question: Christopher, what causes you to miss?

Perkins: I just made some bad shots. When you’re shooting at that distance there are a lot of variables. At that distance, the wind can have an effect on your accuracy. You can make a good shot, but the wind can blow your arrow off the target. I think basically I didn’t make as clean a shot as I should have made.

Question: How do you correct a bad shot on the next shot?

Perkins: Often you’ll basically know what you did wrong, so you go back through your shot procedure and correct that mistake. Most of the time it’s only a little tiny correction that you have to make.

Question: What caused you to miss at the Gold Cup shoot?

Perkins: I probably was a little weak on the shot, and the arrow didn’t come off the string as fast as it should have. So, on the next shot, I made sure I had the bow all the way back to the wall.

Question: Christopher, how many tournaments do you shoot each year?

Perkins: I’ll probably shoot 10 or 12 during the course of a season.

Question: How much are you practicing to get ready for each of those tournaments?

Perkins: I practice every day, and I try to shoot 300 or 400 arrows in a day. I shoot in the morning and then shoot in the afternoon and take a mid-day break. But when you’re shooting that many arrows, your practice session is more or less an all-day event.

Question: So, you’re shooting between 150 and 200 arrows in the morning and the same number of arrows in the afternoon. How many shots do you make before you go pull arrows, and who’s pulling the arrows for you?

Perkins: I shoot 6 arrows before I pull the arrows, and I’m the one who goes to get them and bring them back. I spend most of the day shooting and pulling arrows.

Question: Do you have an archery coach?

Perkins: Yeah, kinda. Greg Nielsen was my first archery coach, and my last coach was Kathy Millar.

Question: What’s the advantage of having an archery coach?

Perkins: When I first started shooting target archery, the archery coach could say, “Okay, you’re doing this wrong, here’s what you need to do to fix it.” I’ve been shooting so much for so long now that I now know what I do wrong when I’m not shooting right, and I know what I need to do to fix the problem.

Tomorrow: What the Future Holds for PSE’s Christopher Perkins

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Christopher Perkins Discusses the Other 50 Percent of Target Archery – The Mental Aspect


PSE's Christopher Perkins

PSE’s Christopher Perkins

Question: Christopher, how do you handle the mental aspect of archery?

Perkins: I think the classic example occurred at the Redding Shoot. I was in the shoot off in day 2 and day 3. I think the real secret when you’ve got that much pressure on you at a tournament is to forget all about the tournament, the other competitor, the crowd behind you, where you are in the standings, what a win can mean to you, and what a loss will mean to you. Instead, focus on shooting that one arrow the best you possibly can. In the shoot off, the lad I was competing against missed the dot, so I told myself, “Okay, he missed the dot. All you’ve got to do is to hit the dot. Whether you hit the center, the edge, the top or the bottom, if you hit the dot, the tournament’s over. So just shoot your normal shot at the center of the dot.” Next, I forgot all about just having to hit the dot and focused on shooting for the center of the dot as I always do, and I focused on trying to make the best shot I could make.

Question: What yardage were you shooting?

Perkins: We were shooting at 88 yards. One of the advantages I had was that I’d been in this position previously. Every tournament you enter and every contest that you come close to winning, you feel the same pressure that you’ll feel in a big contest, and that’s the reason that building experience and shooting a lot of different tournaments can help you handle the mental side of the game. You can say to yourself, “I’ve been here before, I’ve performed well before, and I’ve got every reason to believe that I’ll perform that well again.” You also know that you’ve shot consistently all the way through the tournament, and you expect this last shot to be as good as the rest of them have been, if you execute the shot the same way that you’ve executed it before. The real secret to shooting well in a big tournament is to make sure you shoot exactly like you shoot in practice, exactly like you shoot in little tournaments and exactly like you shoot in big tournaments. Then when you get to a major tournament, you reasonably can expect yourself to shoot like you’ve always shot.

Question: How far out do you think you’re accurate with your PSE bow?

Perkins: The dot at 88 yards is 5 cm, which is about 2.5 inches. In target competition, we shoot that same dot at 90 meters, which is 103 yards, and I can hit the dot at that distance.

Question: How do you hold steady shooting at that range? If you breathe wrong, your shot may be off.

Perkins: Breathing is a part of practice. We use a stabilizer, and if your stabilizer is weighted up properly, when you put the pin on the dot at that yardage, the bow should be steady in your hand. You should be able to make the shot, if you follow your shot routine.

Question: What weight of bow are you pulling?

Perkins: I pull 59.5 to 59.9 pounds. You can’t be over 60 pounds, so I want to crowd my poundage as much as I can without going over.

Question: What sight system are you using?

Perkins: I shoot the Axcel AX3000.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Christopher Perkins Wins the Gold Cup

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Why PSE’s Christopher Perkins Decided to Shoot the Western Classic Trail Shoot in Redding This Year


PSE's Christopher Perkins

PSE’s Christopher Perkins

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. How did he do it, and what has he learned that can help you become a target archer and bowhunter? (Perkins enjoys both sports.)

Question: Christopher, why did you decide to go to the Redding Trail Shoot?

Perkins: I was in Kentucky, and I heard a lot of people talking about this shoot. Everyone at the tournament in Kentucky said that Redding was a lot of fun to shoot and that it was a must for tournament archers. So I booked a plane ticket, and my girlfriend, Katie Roth, went with me.

Question: What was it like going to a tournament and shooting targets that you’d never shot before?

Perkins: I thought it was a very neat experience. The main reason I went was to see what all the shoot involved. I like to go to new tournaments, because I meet new people, and I can try different aspects of archery. I knew a little bit about shooting 3D targets, because that’s the way I started shooting tournament archery. But I’d never shot 3D archery with so many uphill and downhill angles.

Question: How do you handle competing against so many other archers?

Perkins: The number of people in an archery tournament doesn’t really bother me. I never look at the standings at a tournament. Usually the only time I ever look at the standings is after the tournament is over. At home, I only shoot against two or three people, so I had to stay on my feet quite a bit to compete with that many people.

PSE's Christopher Perkins

PSE’s Christopher Perkins

Question: Why don’t you keep up with the standings in a big tournament like this?

Perkins: I’ve seen archers get very anxious before, either because they’re behind or ahead, and then they think they’ve got a chance to win, or they’re afraid they’ll lose. I’ve seen archers get all nervous and excited when they’re in the lead, and that pressure may cause them to not perform as well. So, I’ve never really paid that much attention to the standings. All I really concentrate on at a tournament is the next arrow I have to shoot. When I come to the line to take my shot, I don’t really want to know where I am in the standings. I just want to concentrate on my shot routine and making this next shot the very best I can make it. When I’m at a tournament, I try to focus only on what I’m doing and not think about what anyone else is doing. What the other competitors are doing doesn’t really matter. The whole tournament is about how well I shoot, and that’s the only thing I can control. I try to make sure every aspect of my shot is the same as every aspect of my shot when I’m practicing at home.

Question: How do you go through your shot routine?

Perkins: First, I make sure that I’m standing on the line correctly. Then, I make sure I put the arrow on the string correctly, and I want to concentrate my shot on the middle of the dot. I want to make sure my draw is smooth and that it feels the same way it does when I shoot at home. I want to anchor the shot at the same spot I always do, and I want to rely heavily on the muscle memory that I’ve built up. I make sure I feel my hand on my face, I’m conscious of looking through the peep sight and I want to look at the dot on the target and put my pin sight in the center. Once I execute the shot, I keep my eyes on the target and make sure I have a clean follow through. I never shoot at the dot. I always shoot at the center of the dot. Many people just try and shoot the dot, but I try to make a dead center shot in the dot every time I release the arrow. I’m trying to make the best shot I’ve ever made, each time I step to the line to shoot. If I’ve followed my shot routine exactly and relied on my muscle memory, then every shot should be in the center of the dot.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Christopher Perkins Discusses the Other 50 Percent of Target Archery…Mental

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Christopher Perkins Wins Redding Trail Shoot and Gold Cup


Chris Perkins Takes the World Record!!

PSE’s Christopher Perkins

PSE’s Christopher Perkins Wins Redding Trail Shoot and Gold Cup

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. How did he do it, and what has he learned that can help you become a target archer and bowhunter? (Perkins enjoys both sports.)

Question: Christopher, what bow are you shooting now in tournament archery?

Perkins: I shoot the PSE Dominator Pro.

Question: Why are you shooting that bow?

Perkins: I fell in love with this bow in 2011 when it was first introduced. This year (2012), PSE optimized the cams and made the bow even better than last year’s model. I like the bow, and it shoots well.

Question: In three weeks in May of 2012, you made $18,000 in tournament archery. What tournaments did you shoot?

Perkins: The first week in May I went to the Western Classic Trail Shoot in Redding, California. The tournament is often called the Redding Trail Shoot. I won the male pro division competing against more than 150 or 200 people. I made about $16,000 at that shoot. Then I shot the Gold Cup in New Jersey and placed first in that tournament, and that tournament paid about $2,000.

Question: Christopher, how long have you been shooting tournament archery?

Perkins: About 9 years, but I didn’t start out to be a tournament archery shooter. My dad was a bowhunter, and he bought me a bow. I started shooting targets, so that I could get ready to go bowhunting when I was old enough. My dad heard of some 3D archery tournaments that were being conducted in our area, and he took me to the shoots. When I learned that there was a target aspect of shooting the bow, I tried that type of competition and really liked it.

PSE's 2012 Dominator Pro

PSE’s 2012 Dominator Pro

Question: What do you like about shooting target archery?

Perkins: I get to travel and meet a lot of new people – even from different countries. Archery is a very friendly sport, when you’re on the line competing, and when you come off the line to talk with the other archers you meet at a tournament. And, shooting archery is fun for me.

Question: Okay, the first tournament you won money in this year was the Redding tournament. What kind of tournament is that?

Perkins: This tournament is an NFAA Marked 3D championship. 3D targets are set up at different distances at known distances. For instance, when you go up to the line, they’ll tell you the target is at 35 yards, but you don’t know the yardage cut or how you have to estimate aiming, because the targets are set on an incline or a decline. So, even though you know the distance to the target, you don’t know how much the angle of the target increases or decreases or how you have to sight in on that target. Each target has an orange dot on it. If you center the dot with your arrow, you get 11 points. Each one of the targets is set up at a different yardage, and you are permitted to use a range finder. Some of the range finders will calculate the cut for you. The one I was using gave me the cut.

Question: What range finder were you using?

Perkins: I was using a Leupold RX 1000 with DNA (Digitally eNhanced Accuracy). This range finder belonged to one of my buddies. I didn’t really have a rangefinder that I felt comfortable going to this tournament with, so I asked my buddy if I could borrow his. I liked this range finder so much that after the tournament I bought one. It costs about $400 or $500. This was my first time to ever go to Redding, so I wanted to go with a very reliable range finder. I wanted a range finder that would calculate the true distance to the target, whether it was uphill or downhill. I don’t know how it works. I guess it has some kind of ballistic table, but I found that this range finder was dead on. Whatever it determined the range was, that’s what I dialed in my sights to shoot. We shot 70 targets during the weekend, and I only missed 7 dots.

Tomorrow: Why PSE’s Christopher Perkins Decided to Shoot the Western Classic Trail Shoot in Redding This Year

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


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