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PSE’s Christopher Perkins Gives Tips to Make You a More Productive bowhunter


Christopher Perkins - Target Archery Champion

Christopher Perkins – Target Archery Champion

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks of 2012, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. But, Perkins never really set out to be a tournament archer winning championships and money and gaining sponsors. Like many tournament pros, Perkins just wanted to shoot better, so he could become a more proficient bowhunter. However, Perkin’s love of bowhunting and the desire to become a better bowhunter lead him to participate in archery competitions and world championships. He discovered like many of us have that the marriage between target archery and bowhunting produces a much better target archer and bowhunter than just choosing one of these two archery sports.

Question: What is your opinion on using deer scents and deer lures for bowhunting?

I didn’t use deer scents and lures until last year when two of my buddies and I went to Illinois for a deer hunt. Up here in Canada, I primarily hunt funnels and pinch points where a large block of woods is necked down going to a feeding site. But, I found when deer are cruising in open woods that lures can be effective.

Question: Chris, give us five tips that will make anyone a better bowhunter.

* Participate in target archery to become a better bowhunter. Target archery teaches you not to just aim at the deer and not to just aim at the vital area but to aim at the center of the vital area or the spot you want to hit. In target archery, you learn to narrow your focus to a very small spot that you want to hit, which causes you to shoot more accurately at least that’s what happened to me. Learning that principle of target archery drastically has increased my accuracy as a bowhunter.  Target archery also has made me set up my hunting bow to be just as accurate as my target bow. To make a good shot as a professional archer, I need to be able to shoot and have the arrow hit in the center of a 2  or a 3 inch dot from 50 yards and at every distance for 50 yards to 5 yards. By learning to shoot that accurately, I am much more confident, I shoot better in the woods, and I spend less time trailing deer.

* Practice. Once again even if you don’t get to the point where you can shoot the center of a 2 inch dot at 50 yards, practice shooting archery in the off season to make you a better bowhunter than if you don’t practice.

* Keep your bow tuned up all year long. One of the big mistakes I see when hunters are shooting before the season, and for instance, they know that their strings have some wear on them, they’ll often think, “I can probably get one more season out of this string.” If you think that you can get one more season out of your bowstring, then the day you think that, go, and get a new string. Start shooting that string to get ready for bow season. Maybe you don’t think your sight or your rest or another piece of equipment bad enough or worn enough to justify replacing it. When you think that thought, that’s your brain telling you to replace that piece of equipment now. You never know when that trophy animal of a lifetime will be standing in front of you within bow range. When that opportunity comes along, you want to have the best equipment you can afford to do the best job it can possibly do.

* Make a friend of the people at your local bow shop. When you buy new equipment or new accessories, get them to set up your bow to make sure everything’s put on properly. Bow maintenance year round and practice shooting year round are the most critical elements in becoming a successful bowhunter. Developing your deer hunting skills is a given. You have to do that whether you bowhunt or gun hunt. What we are talking about is specifically being a better bowhunter.

* Develop patience   probably one of the most difficult skills. Remember that bowhunting is a game of waiting. Waiting also includes waiting for the animal to get within the distance that you feel confident that you can make an effective shot. For instance here in Canada where I hunt, I feel that I can make an effective shot at 50 yards IF there’s no wind, and the deer is calm and relaxed and either feeding or looking away from me. I can shoot accurately at distances greater than 50 yards. But in the places where I hunt and under the conditions that I hunt in, I choose not to take a shot of more than 50 yards. If the deer doesn’t come into that range, I don’t shoot  even though there’s a good chance that I can take the deer. You must have patience to wait long enough in the woods sitting in your tree stand or ground blind to finally see a deer and then to wait for that deer to get within the range for you to take a shot.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Dress for Success with PSE’s Christopher Perkins


Christopher Perkins - Target Archery Champion

Christopher Perkins – Target Archery Champion

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks of 2012, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. But, Perkins never really set out to be a tournament archer winning championships and money and gaining sponsors. Like many tournament pros, Perkins just wanted to shoot better, so he could become a more proficient bowhunter. However, Perkin’s love of bowhunting and the desire to become a better bowhunter lead him to participate in archery competitions and world championships. He discovered like many of us have that the marriage between target archery and bowhunting produces a much better target archer and bowhunter than just choosing one of these two archery sports.

Question: Christopher, what are the differences in shooting target archery and bowhunting as to the clothes you wear when in many target archery contests, you wear shorts and a tee shirt, but when you’re hunting at -27 degrees F at the end of a rut in Canada, and you have to sit in the cold for 6 hours to take a buck and must dress differently?

Since I live in Canada, I’m more accustomed to this type of weather than someone from Alabama maybe. The real secret to being able to shoot well in cold weather is to dress in layers and practice shooting the bow with all the clothes on that you’ll need to wear to hunt in cold weather. Or, that’s how I do it here in Canada. Another secret is not to bulk up too much. We have such good quality new high tech clothing that you really don’t have to get bulked up to stay warm and shoot accurately in extremely cold weather. I think your base layer (underwear) is the most important part of your cold weather clothing. I start off with tight layers of Under Armour underwear that fits very tight to my skin. That small zone between your skin and your clothing is where moisture first builds up. Moisture on your skin is a major factor in being cold. One misconception that some hunters have about constrictive type of underwear is that it can inhibit the shot. However, this Under Armour is the same type of underwear that many professional football players wear when they’re playing in extremely cold weather. And, they have to be far more mobile than a bowhunter does. So, I wear that type of base layer to keep moisture away from my skin and keep me warmer. Then I wear a little heavier layer on top of that to add an insulating layer that also helps to keep me warm. On top of that, I put my outer layer, which is usually windproof and waterproof bib coveralls and a heavier jacket.

Question: One of the big advantages that we have now that archers haven’t had in the past is that much of the hunting clothing we’re wearing today is being designed and engineered with more wicking and insulation properties, wind blocking and waterproofing than ever before. The hunting garment industry has become very aware of creating layering systems that are lightweight, very flexible and extremely warm. One of the big advantages that the bowhunter of today has is that much of today’s outdoor clothing is being designed for and created by garment makers who are bowhunters. Therefore, in today’s marketplace if you do a little bit of research and study, you can find lighter weight clothing that’s extremely warm that makes bowhunting in extreme temperatures much better and easier without having to put on clothes that are too bulky.

I don’t want to layer up with so much clothing that I can’t get off an accurate shot. One of the garments that I wear that I’ve found is extremely useful in cold weather is a bowhunter’s vest is made by Primos that allows me to keep everything packed in and tight on my chest and helps to keep my clothing away from my bowstring.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Christopher Perkins Gives Tips to Make You a More Productive bowhunter


PSE’s Christopher Perkins Says to Marry Tournament Archery to Bowhunting to Improve at Both Sports


Christopher Perkins - Target Archery Champion

Christopher Perkins – Target Archery Champion

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks of 2012, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. But, Perkins never really set out to be a tournament archer winning championships and money and gaining sponsors. Like many tournament pros, Perkins just wanted to shoot better, so he could become a more proficient bowhunter. However, Perkin’s love of bowhunting and the desire to become a better bowhunter lead him to participate in archery competitions and world championships. He discovered like many of us have that the marriage between target archery and bowhunting produces a much better target archer and bowhunter than just choosing one of these two archery sports.

Question: Tell us about some other deer you’ve taken with your PSE bow.

I took another buck in 2008 the same year I took my first buck. I took this 9 point buck in October. I never got a trail camera picture of this buck. He just showed up on the property. I had a box full of trail camera pictures of other bucks, but I didn’t have a single picture of this buck that weighed 180 pounds dressed. He was a small basket rack buck that came to within 20 yards, and I took the shot. He went only about 30 yards before he piled up

Christopher Perkins, like many other bowhunters who also shoot tournament archery, knows that one of the biggest advantages of shooting tournament archery during the off season is that you drastically can reduce the amount of time required to trail and find your deer when bowhunting, because you’ll shoot accurately. When you’re able to place the arrow exactly where it needs to go and either get a double lung shot or a heart shot, then most of the time you’ll only have to travel a short distance from where you’ve arrowed the buck to where you find him. Another factor that plays a major role in recovering your animals is the size of the entry hole and the size of the exit wound. The bigger the hole, the better the blood trail. The speed at which the arrow is traveling when it makes impact also helps ensure that you get a clean pass through   just one of the many reasons why people enjoy hunting with PSE bows, since PSE produces some of the fastest bows in the archery industry. In the past, the weight of the bow determined speed. Many years ago archers had to shoot heavy bows to get fast speeds. However, because of the cam systems and the intensive engineering designed in the PSE bows we have today, you can get that good speed with a lighter weight bow. Too, because of the let off system on today’s bows, you don’t have to hold that heavy poundage so long, while waiting for a buck to step out to the spot where you can take the shot. All of us who go afield to take game with our bows want to know that when we draw our bows back and put our sights on the spots we want the arrows to enter the animals that when we release these arrows, they it will fly true to the targets.

One of the best ways to shoot with confidence during hunting season is to build that confidence by shooting target archery in the off season. You not only learn the mechanical and physical skills required to make an accurate shot when an animal presents itself by shooting target archery, but just as importantly, you learn to control your emotions and be able to shoot accurately under pressure. When you’re in the woods, no one is watching when you make the shot. However, a buck of a lifetime standing in front of you impacts your shot with a tremendous amount of pressure, anxiety and adrenaline. When you are shooting target archery, everyone is watching the flight (other competitors you are shooting against) and the final rounds where observers also may include the press and possibly TV crews. In that situation, you have to face and overcome the same mental and emotional problems that you must face and overcome when you have the big game animal of a lifetime standing in front of you. So, shooting target archery in the off season not only will better prepare you mechanically to take game during the hunting season, but it will also better prepare you emotionally for the moment of truth when the big game animal of your dreams presents the shot.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

Tomorrow: Dress for Success with PSE’s Christopher Perkins


PSE’s Christopher Perkins Tells about His Invisible Buck and How He Took Him


Christopher Perkins - Bowhunter

Christopher Perkins – Bowhunter

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks of 2012, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. But, Perkins never really set out to be a tournament archer winning championships and money and gaining sponsors. Like many tournament pros, Perkins just wanted to shoot better, so he could become a more proficient bowhunter. However, Perkin’s love of bowhunting and the desire to become a better bowhunter lead him to participate in archery competitions and world championships. He discovered like many of us have that the marriage between target archery and bowhunting produces a much better target archer and bowhunter than just choosing one of these two archery sports.

Question: Tell us about another deer you took.

I took a deer in 2010 on December 26 with which I had quite a history. I’d been after this older buck for about 3 years. Once I took him, we aged him at about 6 1/2 years old.

Question: Christopher, how did you find this deer?

In 2008, I found where he was holding. The second year I never had an encounter with him, but I had plenty of trail camera pictures of the buck. I knew he was still on the property and hadn’t been harvested by anyone else. I used Moultrie and Bushnell trail cameras on our 243 acre farm. Only two of us hunt the property. So, I loaded up with trail cameras to locate the bucks I wanted to take during hunting season. I think using trail cameras is important, because, since I didn’t have an encounter with this buck, I easily could have given up hunting him. I could have assumed that someone else had taken him, or that he had left the property, if I hadn’t had his pictures on my trail camera the second year I hunted him. This 8 point buck had 5 3/4 inch bases on his antlers and weighed 225 pounds field dressed. I believe that many times there may be big bucks on the properties we hunt that only move at night or just before daylight. Without using trail cameras, we’ll never see or know that we have a trophy buck on the lands we’re hunting. This particular buck was moving when I wasn’t on the property, or he was coming in to feed after I had left.

This buck was one of those really hard deer to hunt   probably the toughest deer I’d ever hunted. He was a very smart buck. He knew where to be when I was in the woods, and he understood where he could be when I left the woods. He would come to feed either late at night or early, early, early in the morning. Therefore I couldn’t go to my stand early in the morning, because I’d spook him off his feed. Then late in the evening, I’d stay in the stand until black dark, and after I left the stand, he would show up. This buck knew what was going on, and he had patterned me to know when and where I would be hunting him. That third year I caught up to him at the end of the rut in really, really cold weather. I sat in my stand for 6 hours on December 26, when the weather  was -27 degrees F. I’ve learned that deer will be on their feet when an area has a hard cold snap and looking for food close to their bedding region. To put the odds even more in my favor, I knew the time was the end of the rut in our section of the country, and he would be chasing does. When I spotted him, he was chasing does. Then I saw the buck coming in behind a doe he was so focused on that he wasn’t aware of anything else around him. When the doe stopped, he stopped, and I was already at full draw. Once he took the arrow, he only went 30 yards before he piled up. I took that buck with my PSE Vendetta bow   the same bow I’d taken the buck with earlier that year. This buck had come in to the same food source. I’m convinced that when you’re hunting older age class bucks you need to have as many elements in your favor as you possibly can. With this buck, the cold snap got the buck up and moving and looking for food, and the time was at the end of the rut, which meant he would be looking for those last does that were ready to breed before the rut ended.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Christopher Perkins Says to Marry Tournament Archery to bowhunting to Improve at Both Sports


PSE’s Christopher Perkins – Bowhunter Who Became a World Class Target Archer


Christopher Perkins - Bowhunter

Christopher Perkins – Bowhunter

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks of 2012, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. But, Perkins never really set out to be a tournament archer winning championships and money and gaining sponsors. Like many tournament pros, Perkins just wanted to shoot better, so he could become a more proficient bowhunter. However, Perkin’s love of bowhunting and the desire to become a better bowhunter lead him to participate in archery competitions and world championships. He discovered like many of us have that the marriage between target archery and bowhunting produces a much better target archer and bowhunter than just choosing one of these two archery sports.

Question: Christopher, when did you start bowhunting for deer?

I went on my first deer hunt when I was 12 years old. I had to be 12 to get a license, and in Canada, you had to take a test before the government would issue you your license. I’d been shooting the bow for a year before hunting season began. I started bowhunting with my dad as soon as I got a license. That first year, I took my first deer, and it was a doe. I shot her at 4 yards. She came across the field and walked right past me. I drew my bow and took the shot. After she took the arrow, she ran about 50 yards and piled up.

Question: What did you feel like when you took your first deer with your bow?

I had a huge adrenaline rush. It’s a feeling that’s hard to describe. I thought I could take a deer out to 20 or 30 yards, but I’d only been shooting for a year. I couldn’t believe that I’d gotten within 4 yards of that deer before turning my arrow loose. I guess that first deer is what really fueled the fires of my archery career. I knew that target archery, at least for me, was a necessity to be a good bowhunter. Since I’ve had my PSE Vendetta, I’ve taken three other bucks with it. The first buck I took with a PSE bow on October 4, 2010, was an 8 point and I took him with my PSE Omen. The buck was 16 or 17 yards away, when I released my arrow. He only went 10 yards before he tipped over. I shoot a Rage Two Blade Broadhead, a mechanical broadhead that makes a big entry hole and a big exit hole. When you hit a deer with this broadhead, you don’t have to do much tracking. I was hunting on the edge of a food plot at a pinch point, where the deer funneled into the food plot. This buck was the only deer I saw that day. If you’ll aim behind the deer’s shoulder at mid body, you’ll have a pretty good hit. But, I try and aim at the center of what I consider a 2 inch target on each deer. Target archery has taught me to not look at the entire target, even though it may be 2 inches in diameter. So, when I’m at full draw on a buck and have picked out the spot I want the arrow to hit, I try and aim in the center of that spot. I concentrate on exactly where I want the arrow to go and forget about the deer, and keep my total focus on the spot I want to hit. Whether I’m shooting target archery or bowhunting, I want to make the spot I’m aiming at as small as possible. Every time I put my pin on a specific spot, I want to make a shot of a lifetime. I want to shoot the best arrow I’ve ever shot. Again, this philosophy comes from target archery.

Question: What type of sight are you using?

I use a multi pin sight for bowhunting called the Axcel Armortech Pro. My pins are set from 20 to 60 yards. So, when this buck came in, I put my 20 yard pin just a little bit low on the spot I wanted to hit, and the arrow went right into the buck’s heart.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Christopher Perkins Tells about His Invisible Buck and How He Took Him


PSE’s Christopher Perkins Wins the Gold Cup


PSE's Christopher Perkins

PSE’s Christopher Perkins

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. How did he do it, and what has he learned that can help you become a target archer and bowhunter? (Perkins enjoys both sports.)

Question: Christopher, where was the Gold Cup held?

Perkins: Bloomingfield, New Jersey.

Question: How many contestants were in your division?

Perkins: There were only 10 or 12 of us, so it wasn’t a very big shoot.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.

Question: How far were you shooting?

Perkins: We were shooting at 70 meters. Normally we shoot at 50 meters, and I don’t understand why they had us at 70. The shoot has gotten to be a smaller shoot, not nearly as big as it has been in the past.

Question: How many times did you miss the center of the target?

Perkins: I missed the dot 5 times out of 72 arrows.

Question: Christopher, what causes you to miss?

Perkins: I just made some bad shots. When you’re shooting at that distance there are a lot of variables. At that distance, the wind can have an effect on your accuracy. You can make a good shot, but the wind can blow your arrow off the target. I think basically I didn’t make as clean a shot as I should have made.

Question: How do you correct a bad shot on the next shot?

Perkins: Often you’ll basically know what you did wrong, so you go back through your shot procedure and correct that mistake. Most of the time it’s only a little tiny correction that you have to make.

Question: What caused you to miss at the Gold Cup shoot?

Perkins: I probably was a little weak on the shot, and the arrow didn’t come off the string as fast as it should have. So, on the next shot, I made sure I had the bow all the way back to the wall.

Question: Christopher, how many tournaments do you shoot each year?

Perkins: I’ll probably shoot 10 or 12 during the course of a season.

Question: How much are you practicing to get ready for each of those tournaments?

Perkins: I practice every day, and I try to shoot 300 or 400 arrows in a day. I shoot in the morning and then shoot in the afternoon and take a mid-day break. But when you’re shooting that many arrows, your practice session is more or less an all-day event.

Question: So, you’re shooting between 150 and 200 arrows in the morning and the same number of arrows in the afternoon. How many shots do you make before you go pull arrows, and who’s pulling the arrows for you?

Perkins: I shoot 6 arrows before I pull the arrows, and I’m the one who goes to get them and bring them back. I spend most of the day shooting and pulling arrows.

Question: Do you have an archery coach?

Perkins: Yeah, kinda. Greg Nielsen was my first archery coach, and my last coach was Kathy Millar.

Question: What’s the advantage of having an archery coach?

Perkins: When I first started shooting target archery, the archery coach could say, “Okay, you’re doing this wrong, here’s what you need to do to fix it.” I’ve been shooting so much for so long now that I now know what I do wrong when I’m not shooting right, and I know what I need to do to fix the problem.

Tomorrow: What the Future Holds for PSE’s Christopher Perkins

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Why PSE’s Christopher Perkins Decided to Shoot the Western Classic Trail Shoot in Redding This Year


PSE's Christopher Perkins

PSE’s Christopher Perkins

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. How did he do it, and what has he learned that can help you become a target archer and bowhunter? (Perkins enjoys both sports.)

Question: Christopher, why did you decide to go to the Redding Trail Shoot?

Perkins: I was in Kentucky, and I heard a lot of people talking about this shoot. Everyone at the tournament in Kentucky said that Redding was a lot of fun to shoot and that it was a must for tournament archers. So I booked a plane ticket, and my girlfriend, Katie Roth, went with me.

Question: What was it like going to a tournament and shooting targets that you’d never shot before?

Perkins: I thought it was a very neat experience. The main reason I went was to see what all the shoot involved. I like to go to new tournaments, because I meet new people, and I can try different aspects of archery. I knew a little bit about shooting 3D targets, because that’s the way I started shooting tournament archery. But I’d never shot 3D archery with so many uphill and downhill angles.

Question: How do you handle competing against so many other archers?

Perkins: The number of people in an archery tournament doesn’t really bother me. I never look at the standings at a tournament. Usually the only time I ever look at the standings is after the tournament is over. At home, I only shoot against two or three people, so I had to stay on my feet quite a bit to compete with that many people.

PSE's Christopher Perkins

PSE’s Christopher Perkins

Question: Why don’t you keep up with the standings in a big tournament like this?

Perkins: I’ve seen archers get very anxious before, either because they’re behind or ahead, and then they think they’ve got a chance to win, or they’re afraid they’ll lose. I’ve seen archers get all nervous and excited when they’re in the lead, and that pressure may cause them to not perform as well. So, I’ve never really paid that much attention to the standings. All I really concentrate on at a tournament is the next arrow I have to shoot. When I come to the line to take my shot, I don’t really want to know where I am in the standings. I just want to concentrate on my shot routine and making this next shot the very best I can make it. When I’m at a tournament, I try to focus only on what I’m doing and not think about what anyone else is doing. What the other competitors are doing doesn’t really matter. The whole tournament is about how well I shoot, and that’s the only thing I can control. I try to make sure every aspect of my shot is the same as every aspect of my shot when I’m practicing at home.

Question: How do you go through your shot routine?

Perkins: First, I make sure that I’m standing on the line correctly. Then, I make sure I put the arrow on the string correctly, and I want to concentrate my shot on the middle of the dot. I want to make sure my draw is smooth and that it feels the same way it does when I shoot at home. I want to anchor the shot at the same spot I always do, and I want to rely heavily on the muscle memory that I’ve built up. I make sure I feel my hand on my face, I’m conscious of looking through the peep sight and I want to look at the dot on the target and put my pin sight in the center. Once I execute the shot, I keep my eyes on the target and make sure I have a clean follow through. I never shoot at the dot. I always shoot at the center of the dot. Many people just try and shoot the dot, but I try to make a dead center shot in the dot every time I release the arrow. I’m trying to make the best shot I’ve ever made, each time I step to the line to shoot. If I’ve followed my shot routine exactly and relied on my muscle memory, then every shot should be in the center of the dot.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Christopher Perkins Discusses the Other 50 Percent of Target Archery…Mental

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Christopher Perkins Wins Redding Trail Shoot and Gold Cup


Chris Perkins Takes the World Record!!

PSE’s Christopher Perkins

PSE’s Christopher Perkins Wins Redding Trail Shoot and Gold Cup

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. How did he do it, and what has he learned that can help you become a target archer and bowhunter? (Perkins enjoys both sports.)

Question: Christopher, what bow are you shooting now in tournament archery?

Perkins: I shoot the PSE Dominator Pro.

Question: Why are you shooting that bow?

Perkins: I fell in love with this bow in 2011 when it was first introduced. This year (2012), PSE optimized the cams and made the bow even better than last year’s model. I like the bow, and it shoots well.

Question: In three weeks in May of 2012, you made $18,000 in tournament archery. What tournaments did you shoot?

Perkins: The first week in May I went to the Western Classic Trail Shoot in Redding, California. The tournament is often called the Redding Trail Shoot. I won the male pro division competing against more than 150 or 200 people. I made about $16,000 at that shoot. Then I shot the Gold Cup in New Jersey and placed first in that tournament, and that tournament paid about $2,000.

Question: Christopher, how long have you been shooting tournament archery?

Perkins: About 9 years, but I didn’t start out to be a tournament archery shooter. My dad was a bowhunter, and he bought me a bow. I started shooting targets, so that I could get ready to go bowhunting when I was old enough. My dad heard of some 3D archery tournaments that were being conducted in our area, and he took me to the shoots. When I learned that there was a target aspect of shooting the bow, I tried that type of competition and really liked it.

PSE's 2012 Dominator Pro

PSE’s 2012 Dominator Pro

Question: What do you like about shooting target archery?

Perkins: I get to travel and meet a lot of new people – even from different countries. Archery is a very friendly sport, when you’re on the line competing, and when you come off the line to talk with the other archers you meet at a tournament. And, shooting archery is fun for me.

Question: Okay, the first tournament you won money in this year was the Redding tournament. What kind of tournament is that?

Perkins: This tournament is an NFAA Marked 3D championship. 3D targets are set up at different distances at known distances. For instance, when you go up to the line, they’ll tell you the target is at 35 yards, but you don’t know the yardage cut or how you have to estimate aiming, because the targets are set on an incline or a decline. So, even though you know the distance to the target, you don’t know how much the angle of the target increases or decreases or how you have to sight in on that target. Each target has an orange dot on it. If you center the dot with your arrow, you get 11 points. Each one of the targets is set up at a different yardage, and you are permitted to use a range finder. Some of the range finders will calculate the cut for you. The one I was using gave me the cut.

Question: What range finder were you using?

Perkins: I was using a Leupold RX 1000 with DNA (Digitally eNhanced Accuracy). This range finder belonged to one of my buddies. I didn’t really have a rangefinder that I felt comfortable going to this tournament with, so I asked my buddy if I could borrow his. I liked this range finder so much that after the tournament I bought one. It costs about $400 or $500. This was my first time to ever go to Redding, so I wanted to go with a very reliable range finder. I wanted a range finder that would calculate the true distance to the target, whether it was uphill or downhill. I don’t know how it works. I guess it has some kind of ballistic table, but I found that this range finder was dead on. Whatever it determined the range was, that’s what I dialed in my sights to shoot. We shot 70 targets during the weekend, and I only missed 7 dots.

Tomorrow: Why PSE’s Christopher Perkins Decided to Shoot the Western Classic Trail Shoot in Redding This Year

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Christopher Perkins Takes the World Record!


Chris Perkins Takes the  World Record!!

Chris Perkins Takes the World Record!!

Christopher Perkins shot the new 70 meter world record at the Gold Cup in New Jersey over Memorial Day weekend. Besides setting the world record, he won the event with a 715, which makes it two in a row, after winning the Redding Trail Shoot a couple weeks ago. Congrats Chris!!

Read the article on Outdoorhub.com!


Chance Beaubouef takes 1st Runner up in the 2012 World Archery Festival in Las Vegas, NV


Congratulations to Team PSE’s Chance Beaubouef! He was the 1st Runner up in the 2012 World Archery Festival in Las Vegas, NV. With 205 competitors in the Compound Unlimited Male Championship division there were only 19 that made it to the shoot-off with a perfect score of 900 for the weekend. Of those 19, 4 of them were shooting a PSE bow – Chance Beaubouef, Chris Hacker, Christopher Perkins and Nshan Thompson. After the 2nd round of regular scoring, only the X counted as a 10 and it narrowed down the field very quickly. By the 6th round it was down to two – PSE’s Chance Beaubouef and Hoyt’s Jesse Broadwater. Both shot a great final round but Chance missed an X by only a fraction of an inch to take the runner-up position.


PSE’s Christopher Perkins Wins the 2011 FITA World Archery Championship in Compound Men’s Individual


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Editor’s Note: Nineteen year old Christopher Perkins of Athens, Ontario, Canada, is a PSE pro staffer. Just a few weeks ago, Christopher won the 2011 FITA World Archery Championship in Compound Men’s Individual after he and his dad traveled to Turin (Torino), Italy. He shot against 836 archers from 84 different countries. Christopher was one of only two shooters in the competition who was 19 years old or younger. He trusted his fate to his PSE Dominator Pro Hybrid bow.

How PSE’s Christopher Perkins Qualified to Shoot in the 2011 FITA World Archery Championship

Christopher, why did you take the PSE Dominator Pro Hybrid bow with you to this world competition, which is the biggest tournament in which you’ve ever competed?
This was a brand new bow that I’d only been shooting for about 3 months. The most important reason I took it to the world competition was that I really felt comfortable shooting this bow. Also, I wanted to prove that PSE built bows that could compete in the highest form of target archery.

Christopher, most archers would have probably have taken their bows with them to a worldwide competition that they’d been shooting 6 months to a year or longer.
I felt like I’d been shooting this bow much longer than I had.

What is it about the bow that you like?
The cam system, and the way the bow felt to me. The cams on this bow open nicely, and I fell in love with the riser, a bridge type riser that was very stable. This kind of riser is also called a shoot through riser, so that there’s no real riser flex after the shot. I feel that this bridge riser is more stable than a deflex riser.

How did you qualify to go to this world shoot?
We had a national championship in Caledon near Toronto, Canada. To qualify, we had 3 days of trials. The first day was a 1440 round. We shot 144 arrows at 50 meters, and I qualified first in the trials. I shot 1415 arrows the first day out of 1440, so I was first in the first round. After the second day of competition, I moved to second place. After the third day, I qualified first in the trials. That competition win qualified me to shoot for Canada in the World Archery Championship. My dad was really excited, since he and I use to shoot 3D archery together. But other than an occasional 3D archery tournament, he doesn’t shoot any other type of target archery.

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PSE’s Christopher Perkins’ Goals and the Equipment He Shot to Win the 2011 FITA World Archery Championship in Compound Men’s Individual

Christopher, who is your coach?
Kathy Milner is my coach. Someone recommended her to me when I first got started shooting target archery. Today, Kathy reassures and supports me when I get ready to go to tournaments. Kathy had told me that I needed to get more experience in competing at bigger shoots. And, so when I won the opportunity to compete in the world shoot, Kathy explained that regardless of how I finished, I needed to go to the world shoot to get experience in the highest level of competition in the world. I didn’t really think I would do as well as I did in this competition, but I thought that this world shoot would prepare me for the next world shoot, if I were fortunate enough to qualify for it. My goal for this shoot was to try and finish in the top 20 of these world class shooters. I’d be happy with that finish. I was going primarily to learn what a world shoot looked like. Since I had no experience in a tournament this big or this prestigious, I didn’t know what to expect. My dad was really thrilled that I was going to be able to go, and we were both really excited about it, not only seeing a world shoot but actually being able to participate in it. I’d only been shooting competitively for 4 or 5 years. I had learned that once my coach helped me get my form right, then she could continue to make sure that I shot the form I’d learned. If I picked up a bad habit, she would help me correct it. Too, she helped me to start working on my mental game, which is a critical ingredient in successful tournament archery shooting.

How did you prepare mentally for this world shoot?
I think the way you prepare mentally is to try and go to as many competitions as you can and shoot against as many world class shooters as you can before you arrive at the world championship. Then, when you’re at the world shoot, you’ve already shot against some of the best archers there are, and you have the confidence that you can perform on that level.

When you arrived at Torino, what did you do?
The first day we settled into the hotel and tried to get accustomed to the time change. Then we went out to the venue to see what the range looked like to get a better idea of what this tournament would be like. Once we arrived, I saw that this tournament would be very different from anything I’d done previously. This shooting venue was held at a castle. The archers had a view different from any others I’d had, because when we stepped to the line to compete, behind the targets stood the castle. We would be shooting toward the castle. Every time I stepped to the line, I could see the castle. The first day we didn’t shoot, we just sort of picked out the landscape.

What did you think when you saw over 800 archers out there practicing?
I didn’t know what to think. This tournament was the biggest world competition that ever had been held with archers participating from all over the world. Luckily some archers were there that I’d competed against in other tourneys, so we were able to talk a little bit. But most of the archers I couldn’t talk to, because they spoke a different language. The next day we had an official practice, and I knew that during the official practice I was shooting really well. Since I knew that the first day of competition, we’d have to shoot 72 arrows, the first day of practice I shot 72 arrows.

What arrows and what release are you using?
I shoot the Carbon Express Nano Pro arrow, and my release is a TRU Ball BT Gold Release. I like this release, because it’s fairly heavy and feels right in my hand. Also it shoots really well. Although I take two releases with me, I shot with the same release all the way through the competition. I like this release too, because I can concentrate on the target, since I never know when my bow will fire.

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PSE’s Christopher Perkins Explains about Qualification Day at the 2011 FITA World Archery Championship in Compound Men’s Individual

What was qualification day like at the FITA World Archery Championship?
We had to shoot 72 arrows at 50 meters. After qualifying, I was in fifth place, shooting a 706 out of 720. First place was Reo Wilde (USA), second was Jessie Broadwater (USA), third was Martin Amspo (Denmark) and fourth was Braden Gellenthien (USA). I felt I’d shot a really-good qualification score, and I was pleased at finishing fifth. Then we had a day off, so I went and shot at the practice range to keep up my level of shooting and competing. I shot about 100 arrows on the off day. The next day we started the elimination round. Because I had placed in the top eight archers, I had two bys. Then I competed in the 116th elimination round, where I beat a lad from Great Britain. Next, I competed against a fellow from Korea, and I defeated him. Those wins took me to the quarterfinals where I competed against Braden Gellenthien from the USA. We both shot 149, and then we went to a single shoot off arrow. He shot a high right pin, and my arrow was 1/8 inch from the dead center of the X. I’d shot 45 arrows before that last arrow shoot-off. In the elimination round, we both shot 14 arrows inside the 10 ring. And even in the shoot off, we both shot the X ring, but I was closest to the center of the X.  So after my competition in the quarterfinals, I was in the top four archers in the competition. After the quarterfinals, we had another day off, and then we shot the semifinals. In the semifinals, I had to face Reo Wilde from the USA. I had shot against him in previous tournaments. We were to shoot 15-arrows each. I defeated Wilde by shooting a 148 out of a possible 150, and Wilde shot a 147. If I had lost in the semifinals, I still would have had an opportunity to shoot for the bronze medal. However, by winning the semifinals, I had an opportunity for the gold medal.

PSE’s Christopher Perkins Tells about the Final Competition for the World Archery Championship in the Compound Men’s Individual

How did the finals for the 2011 Compound Men’s Individual World Archery Championship go?
The finals were between Jessie Broadwater of the USA and me. This was his first World Archery Championship, as well as mine. I’ve competed against Jessie before, and he’s beat me. We shot alternating targets; he would shoot, and then I would shoot. Our first end, we both scored a perfect 30, shooting 3-arrows apiece. The second end, he shot a 29, and I shot a 30. At the third end, he shot a 29, and I shot a 30. At the fourth end, Broadwater shot a 30, and I shot a 28. Going into the very last end, we were tied. Each end consisted of shooting three arrows, and the round was comprised of shooting five ends or 15 arrows. Going into the fifth end, Broadwater had 118, and I had 118. On his first arrow, he scored a 10. On my first arrow, I scored a 10. Broadwater shot his second arrow and scored a 10, and I did too. So, this whole competition was to be decided by the last arrow we shot. Broadwater shot first, and he shot a 9. On my last arrow, I scored a dead-center X, and that’s the arrow that won the competition for me. I won a trophy bow and a watch valued at $1000. The money I earned came from my sponsors.

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What’s Next for PSE’s Christopher Perkins after Winning the World Archery Championship

What does winning the World Archery Championship mean to you?
The whole event, and winning the title, is overwhelming.

What did your friends and your dad think about you winning the World Archery Championship?
They were all excited and really proud for me. I’m only 19 years old, and now I’m a world champion archer. So, where do I go from here?

What do you plan to do now that you’ve won the World Archery Championship?
Keep shooting.

What type of tournaments will you enter now?
At the end of the month, I’m competing in Stage 3 of the World Cup, and I’ll just basically try and shoot World Cup events and some international shoots. Hopefully 2 years from now, I’ll have an opportunity to return to the World Archery Championship, if I qualify, because it’s only held every 2 years.

Chris, do you hunt as well as shoot?
Yes, I do. But my hunting is basically for white tailed deer.

Do you shoot 3D archery?
I once did, but I don’t anymore. I do shoot some 3D competitions just for fun.

Where do you think winning the World Archery Championship will take you?
As far as possible in the world of archery. I want to keep competing and see how far I can go. I want to compete as a professional archer as long as I can. I don’t know what I’ll do after I quit competing in archery; I can’t see that far down the road. I’m really living my dream and am excited about staying in the sport and competing as long as possible. I went to the competition for the World Archery Championship with hopes of qualifying in the top 20, and when I won the event, I was really excited. Right now, I’m just trying to process what I’ve done and see what happens next.

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


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