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Gear Review-PSE Phantom Micro Adjustable Drop Away Rest by PSE’s Al Quackenbush


By Albert Quackenbush

www.SoCalBowhunter.com

Having been a fan of drop away rests for years, I have tested many with decent results. Some are cable driven and others are limb driven. The PSE Phantom™ Micro Adjustable Drop Away Rest is a cable driven drop away rest that offers much more than your everyday drop away. Reviewing the Phantom Micro was very enjoyable and enlightening.

Phantom mounted at rest and ready to shoot

Phantom mounted at rest and ready to shoot

The PSE Phantom Micro Adjust is our finest drop away arrow rest and features a full capture platform for the arrow. The rest falls out of the way for complete arrow clearance. The oversize screws make adjustments and tuning very easy.

Installation of the Phantom Micro is simple, but there were no instructions in or on the packaging, so you have to get them online. This would have been better if they were in the package in my opinion. Follow the directions found here and you’ll be headed in the right direction.

My favorite part is the fact that the rest itself never touches the riser. Unlike most drop away rests, the Phantom sits slightly behind the riser thus allowing it to swivel and function quietly and more efficiently. One of the best features is no aggravating slapping sound when the rest drops. I can’t tell you how much time I have spent trying to quiet down other drop away rests. When the Phantom Micro drops it is ultra-quiet and super smooth.

The curved supports on either side have a rubberized coating providing more sound-dampening when your arrow makes contact. It contains the arrow and is quiet. No more needs to be said.

I did not like that there is no glue or sticky bottom to the rubber piece that sits on your riser. This is the piece that your arrow makes contact with to keep it from making noise. In order to utilize it, you must purchase an adhesive and glue the rubber rest to the riser. If you don’t, the arrow makes constant contact with the riser and metal-on-metal makes noise.

Nice grouping after tuning the Phantom Rest

Nice grouping after tuning the Phantom Rest

I spent two days at the range after I installed the Phantom where I shot a minimum of fifty shots. During that time I had a good friend listen to the bow while I shot. Specifically, I had him focus on the arrow rest. He said he heard no noise and was also impressed at how fast it dropped. The Phantom Micro is the quietest rest I have ever used. I plan on using this rest in 2013 as it boosts my confidence in knowing I have less chance of spooking game.

Overall, I have to say that the Phantom Micro Adjustable drop away rest is one of the best I have put to the test. I like it better than any of the other drop aways I have used and it’s a great buy at $99.99. I have and will continue to recommend this rest to my fellow archers looking for the quietest, most highly functional drop away arrow rest on the market.

Albert Quackenbush has been bowhunting for more than 28 years. He shares his adventures on his blog, www.SoCalBowhunter.com, and also writes for Bow Adventures e-magazine. He is a Pro Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com, Piranha Custom Bowstrings and Field Logic. He is a member of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, California Deer Association, and is a Life Member of the North American Hunting Club.

Albert was born and raised in New York State where he learned to hunt everything from squirrels to whitetail deer. He currently resides in Southern California with his wife and daughter and hunts year round.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.



By Pedro Ampuero

http://www.adventurousbowhunter.com/

Its being a coooold winter, but that has never been an excuse to get out and try our best.

Here are some pics of the last two months of hunting with a total of 21 days out.

chonacoI ahve been after chamois, ibex, deer, boars, duck, partridges,… Had a lot of fun.

Finallly got a huge boar which was awesome!! Hope you like them.

This past weekend I have been filming a TV show, got a two deer and a wildboar, i will send you pics later.

capraLuck is back again! Take care,

Pedro

Pedro Ampuero was raised in Spain, a country full of hunting opportunities in which the hunting season goes year round. He spends many days each year in the field and traveling the world in search of new adventures. You will always find him outdoors scouting, hunting, filming or tracking with his Bavarian bloodhound.

Pedro is a mechanical engineer by trade and a bowhunter by heart. He is the co-founder of the blog AdventurousBowhunter.com and Cazandoconarco.es and has written many articles for the hunting industry and currently collaborates with the most prestigious companies on the industry.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


My Bow Choice by PSE’s Jared Bloomgren


By Jared Bloomgren

I am often asked what makes me decide which bow is best for me. Ever since I began shooting my first PSE nearly 25 years ago I always looked forward to the next year when the new bows were introduced. It was always like Christmas in October when PSE would introduce the new bows and that hasn’t changed one bit today! I always look forward to what PSE will bring out for new bows and technology. This last October was no different! It has came a long ways since I was shooting my PSE Deer Hunter.

I decided to give the DNA a try and I have finally gotten my hands on my own. I have only shot the DNA at 20 yards in an indoor range so I cannot say for sure how I feel about the bow at longer distances. But when I have shot it, it has felt and shot like a dream bow. Smooth draw, vibe free, and very fast. Accuracy and forgiveness will have to be determined after I get it back. I have stripped my DNA down and sent it off to Hydro-Dip in Utah to have it dipped in the new Kryptek Highlander pattern! Once I have it back in my hands and get it put back together you can expect I will be out there shooting this bow out past 100 yards to determine if it will take the place of my Omen.

DNA fresh out of the box!

DNA fresh out of the box!

Okay, I got a bit sidetracked; back to it….what makes me decide which bow is best for me? I am a spot and stalk hunter as you know if you have been following my blogs. I hunt in the west in open country often and having a bow that is fast and forgiving is what I prefer. There are times when a 70 yard shot may present itself and having a flatter, faster shooting bow can make a huge difference. Granted speed doesn’t kill but it does sure help with these circumstances! Having a faster and flatter shooting bow will make judging yardage not as critical. This also increases my maximum effective shooting range. (Watch for a future blog on Maximum Shooting Range)

Ever since the introduction of the X Force HF in 2007 I was very excited! The speed and shoot-ability of this bow was better than ever in the PSE line. Since then the X Force line has continued with new bows over the years and there is an X Force for every style of archer. The speeds are phenomenal and yes, the shoot ability is top notch!

That brings me into the year 2012. I acquired an Omen Pro, black riser with skullworks limbs and accessories. The thing looks saweet! The black and skullworks combination just pops! I was pulling 74# and shooting a 390 grain arrow around 330 feet per second. I was drilling the bulls-eye out to 120 yards and very confident in my shooting and in the bow! I have never shot another bow as good as I am shooting this bow. The thing is a dream for me to shoot!

Omen Pro

Omen Pro

So that leads me back to the DNA. Will the DNA stack up to my Omen Pro? Time and testing will soon tell and I will keep everybody up to speed on my findings. Granted, what bow shoots best for me and what I prefer will not be the case for others. Each person needs to find the bow that compliments them. The Omen Pro has worked great for me and I look forward to trying out other bows as well. I hope to get my hands on an Omen Max too and I assume that will be just like the Omen Pro with a few refinements that I am sure will shoot just as great!

Another all time favorite bow of mine has been my 2012 Revenge. This thing is short and shoots incredibly well. I used it to hunt turkeys last spring and it will likely let the air out of a few more thunder chickens this spring! I would have to put my Revenge right behind my Omen Pro as far as shoot ability and accuracy. The Omen Pro had the edge over the Revenge as the Revenge just doesn’t have the speed and accuracy of the Omen Pro out to farther distances.

2012 Revenge

2012 Revenge

I will do another blog in the future about the DNA and what I think of it. I am pretty confident that it will be what I like in a bow as it is lighter and that would really help in my backcountry hunts. Saving every bit of weight on these hard to do hunts will help out a great deal. As a backcountry hunter I am always looking to shave weight somewhere. But the biggest question remains. Will I be able to shoot the DNA as well as the Omen? Time will tell and I will share my finding with you in the near future! Watch for a one of a kind DNA coming your way!

Jared “J-Rod” Bloomgren is a hardcore Do-It-Yourself bowhunter who strives to better himself each year in the outdoor community. As a professional hunter, freelance writer and photographer, he likes to relive his outdoor adventures through written expression and photography making the reader feel as if they were along on the hunt. He attributes much of his success to the vital education he has learned from the various big game animals that he hunts. He is quoted as saying, “In each and every hunt, success or defeat, I learn something from every outing and that I can put in my arsenal of knowledge to use at a later date, a later date that will again put my wits against that of my prey.”

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Loosen your grip by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson

http://www.fromthedraw.com/

When first shooting a bow there is a lot to learn … stand this way, find an anchor point or two or three, back tension, don’t punch the trigger, level, breath, etc.  The list goes on and on.

I remember getting so frustrated with my husband when I was first learning because he wanted me to get everything right.  Now don’t get me wrong, he had my best interests in mind which is admirable.  While I appreciate his concern for my accuracy and desire for excellency, it can also be exasperating when you are trying to remember everything and your spouse is whispering in your ear, “You did it wrong, again.”  I know he was just trying to help, but I felt like he was secretly enjoying pointing out my errors.  Ugh.  I wanted to throw an arrow at him, and since I’m confessing, I think I chased him around with one at some point. Don’t worry, a broadhead was not fixed to the tip of my arrow!

DSC_0525

Gals, if you are just learning to shoot, here’s a piece of advice:  Find a non-biased friend or someone from a local pro-shop to help with your shooting technique.  I’ve found that it is much easier to hear constructive criticism from a non-husband source.

With that being said, after years of shooting a bow, I am still working on perfecting my shot.  I know there is always room for improvement.  Sometimes a minor adjustment here or there can bring you to that next level of consistency in your shot.  Since we are now in a hunting off-season where most deer hunting has come to a close, don’t put your bow away! I would encourage you to take a look at your form.  Is there any room for improvement in your shot?  Video yourself and evaluate your form.  Have someone else give you a second opinion.

IMG_1252

I know what I’ll be working on … how I hold my bow, specifically loosening my grip.  I need to make sure I’m holding it correctly with the bow grip in the meat of my palm, letting my fingers relax, and trusting my bow sling.  After a missed shot this last year, I can almost guarantee it was because I was so excited that I gripped my bow which ended up giving just enough torque to throw my shot off.  So, I know I need some work in this area.  I’ve asked a friend at a Pro-Shop to make sure I’m holding my bow correctly. I know it will take practice… I can consistently shoot 20 yard shots all day long, but I quickly learned the hard way that if I haven’t formed the habit of consistently holding my bow correctly, it is way too easy to grip and torque your shot during the heat of the moment when the shot counts. I have a date with an elk in about 9 months from now, and I’m not going to make the same mistake twice!

What about you?  Are you taking strides this winter to improve your shot?  What areas do you need to improve on?

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Is there really an off season? By PSE’s Al Quackenbush


By Al Quackenbush

www.SoCalBowhunter.com

Resolutions are tossed around at the start of each year and most last but a few weeks. The off season can seem like it lasts forever, but does it really have to? Does it even exist? For the die hard deer hunter who hunts only deer the off season can feel like an eternity. For guys like me who hunt year round to stay sharp there is no off season. I don’t hunt all the time though. Taking part in other activities not only helps me prepare for whatever hunting I will do in the Fall, but it also helps me out a great deal. Some of my shared tips not only help sharpen your skills, but you might be lucky enough to have one or two lead you to some new hunting land.

As soon as the season is over I review the data I have compiled throughout the season and set a mental note for what areas I want to research through online mapping, zoning and to see if they are private or public land. During the deer season I found areas that were posted and others that I want to explore further. The off season is a perfect time to do that. I begin by scouring the internet, finding out who owns the property and then ask permission to either hunt it or, if I am lucky, seeing if it borders public land in any way.

Take part in events that get you out in nature. What do I mean? Do some shed hunting! Find an area of land and just search for sheds. Volunteer your time in a conservation effort. Take for example the Southern California Bighorn Sheep Survey. I participated in this last year to see what the local sheep habitat looked like and to help count whatever sheep I saw. Not only did I get to meet some new people now turned hunting buddies, but I also was able to hike into an area I normally would not have access to. Come to find out the area has a public access point and there is ample huntable public land. We glassed steep, rocky hillsides for hours and didn’t turn up one single sheep, but we had a great time and knew we’d be back. You can also take in a few hunting seminars. It’s a great way to learn more about the animal you are hunting and a great way to make new friends.

Taking part in the 2012 California Sheep Survey

Taking part in the 2012 California Sheep Survey

Scout, hike and get in shape! Some of you are probably curious as to why this isn’t my number one recommendation. If there is one thing that I avoid is making resolutions regarding losing weight because it is usually the first resolutions I hear made each year. I am not one of the masses who vows to lose weight each year. While I can always stand to lose a few pounds, my goal isn’t to lose a set amount of body fat. I aim more to get out more and hit the trail and better yet, hit the areas that don’t have trails. Get out there and glass new areas and hike them. Get a feel for the land and be sure to take your camera and GPS. Losing fat and gaining lean muscle is an added bonus!

Hiking into new areas is good exercise and can lead to new hunting spots

Hiking into new areas is good exercise and can lead to new hunting spots

You can make an effort toward conservation of the land by picking up trash. Make the hunting areas that much cleaner and safer by picking up what others have left behind. These past two years I have located some seriously trashed areas due to human negligence and we aim to clean them up. Plan a day or two with a group of friends where you hike in with trash bags and pack out every piece of movable trash you encounter. Be aware that there may be creatures making homes in certain items and you should verify each is empty before picking it up. If you can drive a vehicle into some of the areas, try to load them up with as much garbage that you can to reasonably  haul it out. Sure, I know this is hard work and that it shouldn’t have to be your job, but it does give hunters a good name, and more importantly it beautifies the land, make it safer for the animals and gives you greener pastures to hunt in.

Bad luck if you break the miror but good luck if you pick up the trash in the forest.

Bad luck if you break the miror but good luck if you pick up the trash in the forest.

This is also great time of year to utilize some gear you haven’t used often or a good time to pick up somethings you want to try out. Why wait until the hunting season? If you test them out now and list the pros and cons, you will be better off when hunting season comes around. I like to test out gear in the off season to see what works well or not so well in order to consolidate what is in my pack come September. You can find out what is effective for different hunting situations and remove the gear that is not.

Last, but not least is to research some new animals to hunt. Last year it was to hunt elk for the first time and that turned into one of the most memorable hunts of my entire life. This year, with the help of my friend Bill Howard, I am researching an alligator hunt in Georgia. It’s a hunt I have thought about often, but know nothing about. With his help I am going to be finding a way to bow hunt an alligator sometime in the next couple years, but it is not a hunt that I will take lightly. It’s a hunt that will take careful planning and practice while utilizing some bowfishing skills.

Researching hunts like an alligator hunt is exciting.

Researching hunts like an alligator hunt is exciting.

These are but a few of the things I do while preparing to hunt deer in the Fall. For me, there is no off season. In the Spring there are turkey’s to hunt and in Southern California you can hunt wild pigs year round. What a great opportunity to find new areas to hunt, meet some new friends and to hone my skills as a bow hunter. 2013 has much to offer and I plan to enjoy the off season as much as I possibly can.

Albert Quackenbush has been bowhunting for more than 28 years. He shares his adventures on his blog, www.SoCalBowhunter.com, and also writes for Bow Adventures e-magazine. He is a Pro Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com, Piranha Custom Bowstrings and Field Logic. He is a member of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, California Deer Association, and is a Life Member of the North American Hunting Club.

Albert was born and raised in New York State where he learned to hunt everything from squirrels to whitetail deer. He currently resides in Southern California with his wife and daughter and hunts year round.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

 


Taking a Good Picture by PSE’s Dustin Jones


By Dustin Jones

http://www.highcountrybowhunter.com/

Nothing is more exciting than taking an animal with your bow. All of the time that you have put into scouting, preparing, and finally taking that shot has finally paid off. After all of the celebration of recovering your animal has taken place, the next step that most anyone will want to do is take a picture to remember the hunt. Something that I like to take into account is showing respect to that animal. Now I am not saying that the way I take pictures is the way that you should take your pictures, because trust me I still need some work in this area, but there are some tips that will help you capture a good trophy picture.

My first antelope.

My first antelope.

First of all, do your best to remove any blood from the animal. If you are near water it makes it pretty easy to clean up some of the blood using a rag or something to wipe down the bloody area. If cleaning off the blood isn’t possible, usually there is one side that is less bloody than the other. Try and roll the animal or even position the animal in a way that hides most of the blood.

This is an antelope that I had taken and I was so excited to have shot my first antelope with a bow that I hurried to take the picture. You can see there is some blood that I could have washed off and I could have gotten in a better position to see the horns.

My first deer with archery equipment.

My first deer with archery equipment.

Secondly, take care of the tongue. Shove the tongue back in the mouth, hold the bottom jaw, sew it shut, or just cut it off but either way do something to get the tongue out of the picture. That has been one of the biggest things that I have learned to help make a photo look more presentable. I tend to get in a rush after I kill an animal that I forget to take the time to check for the tongue. As you can see in my picture that I could have stuck the tongue back in his mouth and it would have made the photo look a little better.

Dustin Goose 2008
Lastly, show it off. Get down so you are able to show off the antlers (if you were blessed enough to shoot one with them) or just the animal itself. Pictures tend to look better if you are down on the same level as the animal versus you standing over top of the animal. This allows you to truly show off the animal and it just looks better.

 

My dad's elk.

My dad’s elk.

This is one of my favorite pictures of my dad. As you can see, he got down at the same level of his elk and you are able to see the size of the antlers, there isn’t any blood, and the elk’s tongue is not hanging out of his mouth. I’m not saying this is the perfect picture but you can tell the difference between the previous photos and this photo. This is a larger animal with a bigger rack but there were plenty of things that I could have done in my photos to be a better photo to show off.

So when that moment arrives that you get to take some pictures of your kill, take the time to prepare for a great photo that you’ll be proud to show off. You put forth a lot of effort to hunt the animal, so put forth the effort to take a great picture to show off the animal.

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.

Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Keaton’s BC Bruiser by PSE’s Will Jenkins


By Will Jenkins

http://www.thewilltohunt.com/

PSE got word of a monster mule deer taken in British Columbia with a PSE so I tracked down Keaton and got the story Believe it or not this is only Keaton’s second deer with a bow! His first was a 2×2 and now his second buck is a pending record book mule deer with a green score of about 219″. Keaton killed this magnificent buck with his BowMadness MC in only his second year hunting. Now for the story!

Keaton started the day with the attempted stalk of 6 different 4 points, (east coasters remember this means a 4×4 or eight total points). After a quick lunch break he was back out and spotted a 2 point and decided to go after him and see what else might be traveling with him. After 20 minutes on the stalk the buck led him to an overgrown quad trail that Keaton continued down. After walking the trail and having a close encounter with a few does he spotted the two point at about 50 yards. He continued down the trail and after making it about 100 yards he glanced to his left and there he was, staring directly at Keaton. He drew his bow and back stepped about 10 yards to get a clear shot through the trees. He settled his 60 yard pin, released the arrow and the buck took off passed him. As he passed Keaton noticed blood running down his side and knew it was a lethal hit.

Keaton-Buck-2

After taking a moment to compose himself after some major buck fever he started to look for his arrow and the blood trail. Unfortunately he couldn’t’ find either as the hit ended up being slightly high to due to estimating the yardage a little further than it was, easy to do when a monster sneaks up on you! With no arrow and no blood trail he decided to look for sign of a dead deer. He noticed some crows circling not far away. As he arrived where the crows had been circling he again encountered the 2 point and two does. As they walked off he noticed a magpie fly up from the ground and there he was!

After 60 or more failed stalks this season, Keaton was rewarded with the opportunity at a true trophy animal and a buck of a lifetime. He was able to seal the deal using his PSE bow and not only get the trophy but create great memories of an amazing hunt and sharing the recovery with his friend Chris. Congratulations Keaton on an amazing animal!

Will Jenkins is creator of TheWilltoHunt.com and Harnesses For Hunters. He’s an avid outdoorsman who enjoys sharing his experiences through his blog. He also writes for Bow Adventures e-Magazine and is a member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association.

Will lives in Central Virginia with his wife and two kids. He hunts in Virginia and Maryland but has dreams of heading west to hunt Elk and Mule Deer.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Scouting New Hunting Ground from Afar by PSE’s Jared Bloomgren


By Jared Bloomgren

Referencing Google Earth and my map

Referencing Google Earth and my map

When we decide we want to hunt in a new location we preferably like to set foot on the ground, on location, to determine the terrain features and lay of the land. But often times that is not a possibility due to limited time, resources and various logistical constraints. I have been asked numerous times, “How do you scout an area that you have never set foot on before?” “How do you decide on an area to hunt out of state when you are unable to go there yourself?”  These questions have became very common with my most recent hunt where I was able to take down a 400”+ Public Land bull elk in a General Area in a location that is not known for monster bulls! “How did you find this spot to hunt?!”

I first decide on an area to hunt by calling local Wildlife Biologists in the state where I have decided to hunt. I narrow my options down by checking on which states and areas offer a good chance of drawing with at least 2 preference points. I look at past records that I can find about these areas by checking out various talk forums that are geared towards a state by state basis and my species. General tags are also easier to draw than that of a limited tag unit. This means I usually need to find where the public land and general areas are since I do not have a lot of money to throw around to pay access fees or an outfitter/guide.  I am a Do-It-Yourself hunter and have extreme pride in doing my own hunts from start to finish!

Next I start making phone calls to local Wildlife Biologists in the areas that I am interested in. When talking with the local Biologists I ask various questions such as:

1)      Where would you consider the healthiest animals are located this year? (For whichever species you are pursuing)

2)      How have the winters treated the animals in this area and have there been any known diseases lately?

3)      What is the hunting pressure like in this area?

4)      What is the maturity level of the animals in this area?

5)      How is the forage in this area?

6)      What is the terrain like in this area? (most often found out by maps)

7)      Would you hunt this area if you had the option?

If possible, I like to talk to local hunters as well that have firsthand experience about these places. Some ways to go about this is to again visit various talk forums on the internet and put a post on there. Those that are willing to share advice will do so. This can be a huge help as well!  A good title for the post would be, “Looking for advice for Unit 127B in Utah. Help please!” You will find that there are many others out there that like to help others become more successful in their hunting endeavors.

I also like to take a look back at the last year and figure out what the weather was like in the past. What is a dry year, wet year, record harvest year? Etc… Much of this information can be obtained from the Wildlife Biologist that you talk to. This will also help me determine some good areas geographically where there could be a good chance to find an animal of my liking.

Mapping software and maps come in very handy.

Mapping software and maps come in very handy.

When I have this information compiled by writing it down in a notebook, printing off maps, ordering topographic maps and having the Forest Service send me maps; I spread all the information out in a spare bedroom on the bed. This area gives me a chance to lay it all out so I don’t miss anything. I grab my computer and fire up Google Maps and Earth and start studying the lay of the land. I compare the paper maps with that of Google and get a really good understanding of the area I am most interested in. I identify the key terrain features that will likely make animals call it home!

Technology has become a great thing for us to be able to use. I like to find a location that offers everything that my prey needs to survive; everything that my prey needs to feel secure and safe. I go over my information and find areas that look promising. Google Earth allows me to start dissecting that area looking for food, water, shelter, bedding areas, and good travel corridors. When you are using Google Earth you can determine where the feeding areas are simply by looking at open meadows, timber and field edges. Finding water is easy to do as well. Look for low areas that may have plenty of run-off from higher elevations or an area that may have a spring nearby. Wetter areas on Google Earth really stand out by the brighter green shades of foliage. Look for streams or creeks. Look for small ponds; anything that will yield water. Water is essential and almost every animal you will hunt depend on a daily water supply of some sort. Locate bedding areas by looking at a topo map and also Google Earth at the same time. This will help determine potential bedding areas by locating benches, thicker cover, dark timber, rough rugged nasty terrain that pressured animals like to hang out in, etc…Now combine everything; the bedding, feeding, and watering  areas will be connected by travel corridors. When looking at travel areas look for pinch points, saddles, benches, anything that will allow an animal to travel more easily.

Like stated before, I do not have all kinds of money to be able to make long trips to scout before season starts. Being able to use maps and technology really make it possible for me to scout an area without actually being there. Often by the time I step foot on the actual area I know almost as much about the lay of the land as if I would have if I have been there before. Granted, I will not know what is there for animals but if I have done the research right there will be animals there, no doubt! Doing just this allowed me to take a bull of a lifetime in 2012 and quite possibly one of the largest bulls ever taken on Public land in a General area with archery equipment! A DIY bull that will rank high in the MT record books!

This is a very low down and dirty process and a lot more details go into it. For blog purposes you get the point.  Feel free to look for more detailed and future articles and stories at my web site that I am expanding called Trigger Addiction located at http://www.triggeraddiction.com.  What Triggers your Addiction?

Picking out favorable terrain features that will help hold animals

Picking out favorable terrain features that will help hold animals

Jared “J-Rod” Bloomgren is a hardcore Do-It-Yourself bowhunter who strives to better himself each year in the outdoor community. As a professional hunter, freelance writer and photographer, he likes to relive his outdoor adventures through written expression and photography making the reader feel as if they were along on the hunt. He attributes much of his success to the vital education he has learned from the various big game animals that he hunts. He is quoted as saying, “In each and every hunt, success or defeat, I learn something from every outing and that I can put in my arsenal of knowledge to use at a later date, a later date that will again put my wits against that of my prey.”

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


An Archer’s Morning by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson

Blog: http://www.fromthedraw.com/

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Carrying bow in hand and arrows in the other, the archer journeys through the open field.  An established target lays waiting along a well worn path.  The archer doesn’t want to miss the moment.  She makes an appearance briefly each morning, nods and slips away after illuminating the land with glorious stretched out rays.  Each new day is introduced in morning splendor as she swings her lantern of light across the horizon.  She is making her way, evidenced by the surrender of darkness, so the archer quickens his step.  Dawn is drawing near and the archer will be there to greet her.

The rhythm of the draw, aim, and release is mesmerizing, which somehow pauses the spinning of the world as an arrow slices through the crisp clean air.  Fingertips begin to grow numb as Jack Frost makes an appearance, but Dawn’s soft golden rays greets the archer with a kiss simultaneously as the string is anchored to lip’s edge.  The favor is returned as glistening rays dance off the tip of the arrow now slicing through the thin veil of breaking light.  The dance continues.  Anchor.  Breathe.  Aim.  Release.

Morning is now chasing Dawn across the prairie, threatening to snatch up her golden rays as the sun inches higher in the sky.  The brilliant rays of first light has done it’s job and pierced through the archer’s heart.  Dawn’s tranquility has swept by, leaving an archer in an open field thankful for another day.  Through the peep hole of a bow sight, the archer winks and watches as she introduces the day gracefully.  She winks back and slips away with a promise to return to catch the next arrow in flight.

The archer gathers arrows and journeys on, ready to face the day with the promise of Dawn coming again.

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Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado which allows her to hunt elk each September in the Rocky Mountains. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Stalking Boars by PSE’s Pedro Ampuero


By Pedro Ampuero

Blog: http://www.adventurousbowhunter.com/

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Wildboars in Spain have always experience a huge hunting pressure, and can get really spooky.

This pressure has made them be most of the time nocturnal, which makes really hard to hunt them.

Luckily, it has been a great year of acorns, and we have been seeing some boars at last day looking for them.

This has allowed us to spend some days trying to stalk boars, which is way more fun than waiting for them in a tree. They have an awesome nose, but the hearing and eyesight is not as good as deer, so you can get closer. I shot this young boar from 30 yards.

Its getting colder every day, and I hope to be able to drop some more during the last month of the season.

Good luck all in the woods,

Pedro Ampuero

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Pedro Ampuero was raised in Spain, a country full of hunting opportunities in which the hunting season goes year round. He spends many days each year in the field and traveling the world in search of new adventures. You will always find him outdoors scouting, hunting, filming or tracking with his Bavarian bloodhound.

Pedro is a mechanical engineer by trade and a bowhunter by heart. He is the co-founder of the blog AdventurousBowhunter.com and Cazandoconarco.es and has written many articles for the hunting industry and currently collaborates with the most prestigious companies on the industry.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


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