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PSE’s Dustin Jones on Trail Cameras


By Dustin Jones
http://www.highcountrybowhunter.com/

Trail Camera

Trail Camera

Setting out trail cameras is a way to keep hunting even when the season comes to a close. To me it is just as exciting setting one out and coming back a couple weeks later to see what it has captured. I’m like a kid on Christmas as I sit and wait in anticipation. I wanted to share with you some tips to help make sure you are getting decent pictures.

The first thing is finding a spot to put the camera. Find a well-used trail, a food plot, water hole, or just a spot that looks like it has lots of activity. There are sometimes that I have set up a trail camera on what I thought to be an awesome spot and came to find out that it was used very seldom. Look for fresh sign with lots of recent activity.

Trail Cam Shot

Trail Cam Shot

Don’t point the camera at 90° angle to the trail unless you are using a mineral lick, scrape, or bait. Majority of hunters setting out their trail camera place it on the nearest tree to the trail and set it perpendicular to the trail. This causes frustration when you go and pick up your camera because more than likely you are going to get blank pictures or partial pictures of animals. When you point the camera at a 45° angle down the trail you increase your odds of getting a shot of the entire animal versus a partial shot.

Remove any obstructions. I know that you want to hide your camera but if there are any obstructions in the way there are several things that can happen. First you will get pictures of nothing because that obstruction may be moving in the wind causing the camera to be set off. Second, whatever is obstructing the camera will be lit up by the flash whether it is an LED or white flash. The best thing to do if you don’t want people to mess with your trail camera is to invest in a security case for the camera. The last thing you want to do is spend money on the camera just to have it stolen a couple weeks later.

Early Season Buck

Early Season Buck

Lastly, pay attention to the sun. When at all possible make sure that when you set up the trail camera not to have it be pointing in the sun. Whether it is in the morning or the evening, try to make sure that the sun rises and sets behind your trail camera. This will help reduce blank images as well as wash out images. When the trail camera is facing the sun and it takes a picture, you will have an extremely white washed out image. The best thing to remember is to have your camera point to the north. The sun’s path will be slightly to the south of the trail camera if you do so and this will greatly reduce washed out images.

One thing that is always promising yet frustrating at the same time is setting up trail cameras. The promising thing is that you are able to see if there is anything moving through that area while you hunt. The frustrating part about it as well is you get to see some of the animals that come by and with my luck I’m either there a day late or a day early. But all in all it is a great way to monitor where you are hunting and it helps you try and pattern the animals. So get out there and have some fun setting up your trail camera.

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.
 
Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.
 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Will Jenkins on Buying Online vs. Pro Shops


By Will Jenkins
http://www.thewilltohunt.com/

IMG_7692

The internet has changed the retail market and the hunting and archery industry is no exception. There are many deals to be had on the internet and while that may seem appealing please consider a few things before you click buy it now or send that paypal payment.

If you buy online you’re going to need your bow tuned. Even if the bow comes in your draw weight and length you still need to tune it and make sure it’s good to go. If you work on your own bow that’s a little different but it never hurts to have a pro shop take look at it. The key here is tuning isn’t free. So consider the cost of tuning at your local shop in addition to the deal you’re getting. If you aren’t sure what the tuning might cost check with your local pro shop. Conversely, most pro shops will tune any new bow purchased at no additional charge. So even if you’re saving $50 off retail for the bow but taking it to the pro shop to get it tuned is going to cost you $60, just go buy it right from them.

Also consider buying from your pro shop just to support a local business. Most pro shops are owned by the guy behind the counter who puts in a lot of hours. Plus, you’ll have the opportunity to shoot several bows and make sure you like a certain model before purchasing. I’m a big proponent of shooting what feels good to you and fits you. It all boils down to what you are confident with.

Pro Shop

Now, back to buying online. If you’re on a strict budget the internet can be ‘where it’s at’ so to speak. You can often find big discounts on models a year old or slightly used models from archery forums. This may not get you the perfect fit but it will a get a bow in your hands at a low cost. Even buying a bow a few years old can work out great just do your research on the seller.

The bottom-line, if you’re ready to spend some money and invest in a new or last year’s model bow, buy it at your local pro shop. If you can’t afford that, first check to see if your local pro shop carries used bows and skim the internet looking for deals that will get an affordable bow in your hands. If you are new to archery stick with the pro shop as much as possible!

Will Jenkins is creator of TheWilltoHunt.com and Harnesses For Hunters. He’s an avid outdoorsman who enjoys sharing his experiences through his blog. He also writes for Bow Adventures e-Magazine and is a member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association.

Will lives in Central Virginia with his wife and two kids. He hunts in Virginia and Maryland but has dreams of heading west to hunt Elk and Mule Deer.
 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Jared Bloomgren The Red Zone


By Jared Bloomgren

The “Red Zone”…..a stage in every stalk that I CRAVE! My bow is checked over one last time for anything that may have went wrong up to this point…..I recheck my position to ensure I am on track….Grab a quick drink and a take a quick stretch….Pack comes off, boots come off or booties are put over my boots, my senses enhance even further and my reaction time quickens all while slowing down. Each movement, each step, and each breathe is thought about with much more thought and concentration. Moving like a wild animal with stealth, concentration and thought out movement is a must!

Often times staying low and slow in very important.

Often times staying low and slow in very important.

The Red Zone can vary on the terrain but for me it is usually the last 150 yards of the stalk. You are now within easy hearing distance of your quarry and often times may be within sight as you move. Picking the best possible route is a must during the final stages of your stalk while you are in the Red Zone.

One of my favorite quotes, one that says it all and doesn’t need to be explained: “Getting close to game undetected and maintaining self control while delivering a well placed shot are the true keys to bowhunting success.” -M.R. James

Sneaky Pete Feet

Sneaky Pete Feet

Now there are a lot of things that need to come into consideration at this time and you need to become more aware of your surroundings. Like stated above, when I decide that I am in the Red Zone I remove my pack and take a quick break, grab some water and remove my boots or put on Sneaky Pete Feet or some other type of booty to help muffle the noise I may make while walking. I take a quick survey to be sure that I am on the right track. One thing I forgot to mention on my last blog is that I input the animal’s likely position into my GPS before I leave my vantage point. That way I can use that as a reference while I move helping me keep on track. I don’t rely on it solely because picking the animal’s position could be off substantially.

Twigs and branches are not your friend in the Red Zone!

Twigs and branches are not your friend in the Red Zone!

Paying attention to each step is a must and vital to achieving the overall end state. It always seems that when you take that one step and you weren’t watching where you place that foot is when you find that noise maker! A twig, pine cone, leaves, etc…you get the picture. Not only must you pay attention to the ground you need to watch for tree branches and brush that may rub against your equipment or gear that would cause noise. Loose rocks can also be a nuisance. Picking a route that avoids anything that can make noise is very important. Another crucial factor is the wind and/or thermals. Have they changed? Are they still steady and in the right direction? I have had to re-plan a stalking route a time or two when I have gotten into the Red Zone because of these variants. Sometimes finishing the final stage of the stalk will require switching up the plan and making adjustments.

Stepping on this pine cone could ruin all your hard work in a hurry.

Stepping on this pine cone could ruin all your hard work in a hurry.

It doesn’t matter if I first spotted the animal from 2 miles away, the final 150 yards usually takes the longest. Slowing the pace 10x’s will help you move more quietly and it will also help calm your nerves. If possible I will try to get a visual on the animal to ensure that it hasn’t moved. There are times when you have to find the animal again as it may have gotten up and moved a bit before re-bedding a short distance away. Generally they won’t move too far away but may change position to get back into shade if it is a warm day. If you cannot locate em’ just keep going with the stalk, nice and slow as if it is still bedded in the same spot. Keep your eyes peeled and be ready.

It doesn’t matter how many stalks that I have done. I always get an adrenaline rush when I finally see that animal. It always requires me to take a quick break to regain composure if at all possible. My senses become even keener and movements slow even more as to not tip that animal off. When I get into position for a shot I make sure that it is a shot that I know will be a good clean kill. I take another deep breath and look at my sticker on back of my arrow rest, “Stay calm and pick a spot.” It helps to make me focus and think about the task at hand.

PSE's Jared's reminder.

PSE’s Jared’s reminder.

Sometimes I have had to wait for the animal to stand in order to get that shot. There are different ways of helping to get that animal up. You could throw a rock or grunt but I have found by trial and error that that isn’t the best way. Patience is always the best option. Patience will yield you far more animals than anything! (watch for a future blog about the importance of PATIENCE) I like to wait the animal out and let it make the call. Eventually it will stand to reposition in the bed or to move to feed. Being ready during that time is a must! By throwing a rock or grunting it will give that animal an idea that something else is in the immediate area and most often they will bust out of their bed. By letting the animal decide when it is ready to stand will have them far more relaxed and allow you more time to take the necessary shot. But be patient! It could take sometimes hours for the animal to stand or it could take seconds! Nothing like gambling!

If you have been following my blogs you now know the proper way to help you become a successful Spot and Stalk hunter. Spot and stalk hunting requires the most patience in my opinion and it really pits your wits against that of your prey. It is the hardest style of hunting and the rewards are far more rewarding in the end! After 25+ years of spotting and stalking I still learn something on every outing; something that I put into my bag of tools to use on a later hunt. Never stop learning and always keep advancing! Keep your mind open to always learning more! GOOD LUCK!

Jared “J-Rod” Bloomgren is a hardcore Do-It-Yourself bowhunter who strives to better himself each year in the outdoor community. As a professional hunter, freelance writer and photographer, he likes to relive his outdoor adventures through written expression and photography making the reader feel as if they were along on the hunt. He attributes much of his success to the vital education he has learned from the various big game animals that he hunts. He is quoted as saying, “In each and every hunt, success or defeat, I learn something from every outing and that I can put in my arsenal of knowledge to use at a later date, a later date that will again put my wits against that of my prey.”

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Your Opinion Matters by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

PSE's Emily Anderson Campfire

PSE’s Emily Anderson Campfire

Has this ever happened to you? Sitting around the campfire the evening before the morning hunt, several hunters discuss the plan for the morning and one is strangely quiet. Maybe the “one” is new in the group; or maybe the “one” is the token girl…

The question hangs in the air…. does their opinion matter?

Okay, guys, you’ve invited your spouse, girlfriend or daughter into your hunting camp. They’ve now entered your world of hunting and all that comes with it. They no longer question the reason for all the excitement when hunting season comes around. The girls not only understand the hunting fever and all that comes with it, they now join in the fun at every opportunity. You have won over the other side and together you are now counting down the days until you can do it all again each season. Bows, Camouflage, Arrows, Range Finders, Tree Stands, Backpacks. They all come in pairs, and your designated hunting closet space just shrunk – as evidenced by heels replaced by hiking boots.

But here are some questions for you… Do you value their hunting opinion? Do the girls in your world have a say in the planning? Do they get to voice their opinion when discussing the next hunting tactic?

Guys, hear me out. I know you may be cringing a little at this point. You have been hunting a long time and we (ladies) may be presenting some bizarre ideas. However, here is your challenge… Don’t roll your eyes, discredit or discourage us from our attempt to join the conversation and offer our hunting opinion, because in doing so, you may not realize you are squashing the new gal’s attempt to simply join in. I now understand how challenging this may be, because when I started hunting I honestly didn’t know what I was talking about at times, e.g., not considering weather, thermals, hunting pressure, etc. However, my challenge to you guys is to gently explain to the newbie WHY we may be wrong. Don’t extinguish the spark! And who knows? Maybe that crazy idea will shake things up and it is just the out of the box idea that works!

On the flip side, Ladies, you need to consider a few things before just jumping in and flapping your jaw (I’m speaking from experience here). May I be a little vulnerable? At times, I remember being a bit frustrated during my first years of hunting. I wanted to not only join the conversation; I at least wanted my opinion to be valued. I’m not pointing fingers in any way here, I’m simply saying that as a girl it is easy to let your emotions / feelings rule the day and forget to balance it out with reason. So here are some tips to think about before speaking…

Camp

Camp

1. Experience – Remember that if you are new to hunting; the friends that have invited you into their camp have more experience than you. The simple fact is experience speaks volumes and demands respect. Yes, you want your opinion to be valued, but it is usually experience that is going to win the day. Don’t forget that and instead of turning a deaf ear, it would behoove you to listen to the wisdom from experienced hunters. They have already experienced the thrill of a close encounter, learned lessons during long stalks, or may even think like the animal being hunted… anticipating their next move.

2. Time – Consider the amount of time the group of hunters you are now hunting with have spent together in the woods. They may have hunted the same unit multiple years together, maybe decades. It takes time to become part of the group and develop your own hunting stories. Cherish the opportunity that you are now part of the group, but honor the memory of past hunts you were not a part of. Let them share the stories, and glean valuable information shared from previous hunts.

Outdoors

Outdoors

3. Territory – Respect the fact they trust you with keeping a secret. Most hunters have a favorite hunting spot which is not even whispered about to a close relative or good friend. It is the honey hole on public land that hasn’t been overtaken yet by the masses. Or even private land acquired through hard work in order to be given permission to hunt. These are the places hunters only tell certain friends about – and if you are one of the privileged ones, respect that!

After considering these things, be thankful you are now part of the team and then jump into the conversation. Your opinion does matter!

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Aloha From PSE’s Pedro Ampuero


By Pedro Ampuero
http://www.adventurousbowhunter.com/

PSE's Pedro Ampuero Surfing

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero Surfing

A few weeks ago I had to travel to the state of Hawaii for business. It was a great experience, since being there changed my whole picture of Hawaii as a hunting destination.

The different islands have almost every possible ecosystem, from deep rainforest to deserts and from sandy beaches to high altitude volcanic mountains. You can be surfing in the morning and hunting in the afternoon.

In these highly varied terrains, you can find species like the axis deer, hogs, goats, mouflon, sheep and turkey. It was also nice to discover that you can hunt all year, and that there were lots of bowhunters on the islands.

PSE's Pedro Ampuero

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero

I found some time to meet with my good friend Ryan Kohatsu to go out hunting mouflon. I was really surprised when we got up to 12.000 feet to find them! I would have never imagined myself hunting sheep at that height in HI.

PSE's Pedro Ampuero & friend Ryan Kohatsu

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero & friend Ryan Kohatsu

So if you are planning some vacations to relax, do not forget Hawaii!

Good luck in the mountains, be safe,
Pedro Ampuero

Pedro Ampuero was raised in Spain, a country full of hunting opportunities in which the hunting season goes year round. He spends many days each year in the field and traveling the world in search of new adventures. You will always find him outdoors scouting, hunting, filming or tracking with his Bavarian bloodhound.

Pedro is a mechanical engineer by trade and a bowhunter by heart. He is the co-founder of the blog AdventurousBowhunter.com and Cazandoconarco.es and has written many articles for the hunting industry and currently collaborates with the most prestigious companies on the industry.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson’s Elk Chorizo Pizza


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

This is the time of year we are all dreaming up new recipes for using all the game meat safely tucked away in our freezers, at least I know that I am. Hopefully, a tag has been filled by someone in your household and you also have the “problem” of overabundance of meat that’s just waiting to be made into some delicious entree. If that is the case, then I have a great idea for dinner tonight!

ELK CHORIZO PIZZA
I made this the other night and it was Oh-My-Goodness Good! My taste buds are salivating just thinking about it. Here is the recipe…

Pizza Dough

Pizza Dough

1. Prepare Crust: Defrost one loaf of frozen bread dough. Cut it in half and set one aside. Generously flour the surface of a clean counter top. Roll dough to the desired thickness for your crust. (You can also take advantage of any pizza tossing skills you have.. even if you don’t, it could prove to be fun. Just don’t let the dough fall on the ground!) Place your crust on a round cookie sheet or pizza stone.

Browning meat

Browning meat

2. Brown Meat: Cook your elk chorizo on med-low heat until thoroughly browned. You could also use any type of elk / venison breakfast sausage. I prefer elk chorizo because it has a little more kick!
3. Add Toppings: Spread a thin layer of pizza sauce. Sprinkle mozzarella cheese evenly over sauce. Add elk chorizo and any additional desired toppings.

Toppings!

Toppings!

4. Bake: Slide your pizza into a pre-heated 375 degree oven for about 15-20 minutes until the crust is nicely browned and toppings are cooked. While this one is baking, use the second half of the bread dough and prepare Pizza #2. Enjoy!

Finished Pizza

Finished Pizza

P.s. I have to warn you that it is easy to get distracted while making this pizza because you will be focused on the end result of mouthwatering goodness. If you take off your wedding ring to prepare this pizza, it is a good idea to make sure it is safely stored in a jewelry box or other secure location. I made a VERY expensive pizza the other night when I realized my ring was swept into the garbage. Maybe Santa will bring me an elk wedding ring for Christmas…

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Constructing Ground Blinds in the High Desert By PSE’s Albert Quackenbush


By Albert Quackenbush
www.SoCalBowhunter.com

PSE' s Albert Quackenbush's Ground Blind

PSE’ s Albert Quackenbush’s Ground Blind

It is essential to be hidden from plain view when trying to arrow a big game animal. They are smart and have lightning fast response time. We use camouflage, face paint, natural surroundings and blinds to give us an edge. For most of us DIY hunters, saving money is also essential in keeping our wallets full and our spouse happy. Instead of buying an expensive ground blind, you can reduce the cost dramatically by making your own ground blind when in the field. I will focus on deer hunting, but these practices can be used for other game animals as well.

Trimming the dead branches to open up shooting lanes

Trimming the dead branches to open up shooting lanes

First and foremost, you must know and understand the laws regarding hunting public and private land for your city, county and state. Believe it or not, there are laws in many places dictating whether or not you can trim a tree on public land. Common items you will find in my pack at all times are a set of pruners. On public land I will use them to trim dead branches or fallen branches. On private land, I will trim whatever the landowner allows me to. For the purpose of this blog I am going to focus on public land ground blinds.

Second is ease of use and accessibility. I don’t have the luxury of hunting close to any road. No, I have to hike in a mile or more in order to find a decent spot to set up. For that reason I don’t use a pop-up blind as they are heavy, bulky and awkward to carry over long distances. While I do a fair share of spot and stalk hunting, I do like setting up in a funnel or pinch point. In the past, I have carried in roll-up blinds to hide my shape from the deer. The drawbacks are carrying it, weight and breaking up the shape of the blind itself. You still need to brush it in when hunting deer because of the straight edges. It defeats the purpose, right? When there isn’t much cover and I have to hike in a long distance I construct my own ground blind.

Adding grass and loose weeds to fill in the gaps

Adding grass and loose weeds to fill in the gaps

Spot and stalk is one of the preferred methods of hunting out here. When I construct a ground blind I take into consideration that I may locate an animal and need to get after it quickly or get a more open area for a shot. I choose a spot that will give me plenty of protection visually, but also give me an escape without impeding my mobility. What I mean by this is that I will at least give myself an open area to dash out if need be. When choosing my spot I also make sure that I have plenty of shooting lanes.

I will find a funnel, pinch point, food source or well used trail and set up a blind in an ambush area. I am certain to choose a spot where my back is against a bush or brush so that it breaks up my outline. A tree that is as wide as or wider than my shoulders is preferred, but in the high desert where I hunt, finding a tree can prove difficult to find.

Clearing out debris for quiet movement

Clearing out debris for quiet movement

Clearing the ground of debris is next on my mental checklist. Loose branches and leaves are shuffled to the imaginary edge of where I think the edge of the finished blind will be.

In my pack I carry a large piece of camouflage netting. I will string this between the bushes or across the brush and anchor it. This netting will break up my silhouette and will hide me better from approaching animals. Once I get it to where it isn’t flapping around, I then spend a few minutes collecting downed branches, large and small. If I can find some with leaves on them that is a plus. When I find a branch that is too large I take out my pruning shears and clip them down to make them smaller. Stack them about two feet high if possible and be sure to make it dense enough so you can’t see through it. If you can see through, so can the deer! I collect grasses and weeds and tuck them into the crevices to be sure a deer can’t see through my set up.

Camouflage netting comes in handy for making DIY ground blinds

Camouflage netting comes in handy for making DIY ground blinds

After the outside looks good, I get behind the blind and draw my bow. I do this to ensure I have plenty of shooting lanes and that the netting or any branches do not impeding my shooting. If I find a branch in my way I get out my pruners and trim them back. Once that is set, I am ready to hunt.

 Picking up loose branches and grasses

Picking up loose branches and grasses

After my hunt, I am sure to take the blind apart. I remove the branches and weeds and scatter them around. Then I take down my netting and pack it up. Because I hunt public land, most times I set up a blind it is used only once, unless I find this is a great area with little pressure. Even then, I tear down the blind so other hunters don’t spot it and also figure out it’s a good spot.

Albert Quackenbush has been bowhunting for more than 28 years. He shares his adventures on his blog, www.SoCalBowhunter.com, and also writes for Bow Adventures e-magazine. He is a Pro Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com, Piranha Custom Bowstrings and Field Logic. He is a member of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, California Deer Association, and is a Life Member of the North American Hunting Club.

Albert was born and raised in New York State where he learned to hunt everything from squirrels to whitetail deer. He currently resides in Southern California with his wife and daughter and hunts year round.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Dustin Jones Explains the Benefits of a Tree Stand


By Dustin Jones
http://www.highcountrybowhunter.com/

View From 2 5Feet

View From 2 5Feet

Hunting can be done in many different ways. You can set up and do a spot and stalk hunt, set up a ground blind, or even set up a tree stand. Whichever way you choose to hunt the key is to stay out of view. There are many instances where one set up would be preferred over the other but I want to focus on a couple of the benefits of sitting in a tree stand.

One of the major benefits of sitting in a tree stand is obviously being above the animal you are hunting. When you are up in a tree you are able to see further which can help you prepare for your shot. As you watch that animal make its way towards you, you can prepare yourself mentally as well as physically. When I see that deer or elk moving in closer, I start to determine where he will come walking by and where my shot will be. Then as quietly as possible I start to position myself while watching the animal so that I am not getting busted. They still look up in the trees so it is important to make very subtle movements as you are preparing for the shot.

Deadly View From TreeStand

Deadly View From TreeStand

Also being above the ground you are carrying your scent up the tree with you. I know that your scent will be dispersed as you are sitting in the tree, but you are up off the ground instead of on the same level as their nose. I’m not saying that you do not need to worry about scent control. Scent control should be a ritual no matter what style of hunting you are doing. While I am sitting in my stand I like to carry a scent wafer that I can set on a limb next to me to help cover my scent because let’s be honest, according to deer we stink.

The most important thing to remember about sitting in a tree stand is safety. Always wear a safety harness while in your stand, there is no animal worth the chance of sitting your stand and seriously injuring yourself or worse. When you are setting up your stand be sure to set it up at a distance that you are comfortable with. If you are uneasy with heights then set up your stand at a height that you are able to sit in comfortably. With this being said, I like to set my stand anywhere from 20 – 25 feet off the ground. This height for me is comfortable and it gives me a great view of the surrounding area.

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.
Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Will Jenkins Says Don’t Stop Now!


By Will Jenkins
http://www.thewilltohunt.com/

Target Practice

Target Practice

Practicing that is! If you’re still toting a bow into the woods it’s likely you’ve been spending a lot of your spare time hunting rather than practicing. When really there’s no more important time to practice then right now for several reasons. If you haven’t had a very successful season have you even shot lately? Is your form staying consistent? After dragging your bow through the woods has anything shifted?

I’ll start with perhaps the one thing that is most likely to screw up your hunt if you aren’t currently practicing and it really doesn’t have to do with lack of practice. If you’ve been walking miles through the woods carrying a bow sending it up and down a pull rope from your tree stand or letting it bounce around in your truck things may have shifted. Even if you take every precaution before season tightening everything down to make sure it doesn’t move, it still can.

3D Practice Photo taken By Mark Huelsing

3D Practice Photo taken By Mark Huelsing

If there’s ever a time to practice on a 3D target it’s now. I don’t stand in the yard flinging dozens of arrows like I might do over the summer because my free time is a little short this time of year but I do try to put 5-7 arrows into a 3D target a couple of times per week. This makes sure that my form and my bow are consistent and I’m practicing shooting at the same target I hope to encounter in the woods. When hunting I don’t usually shoot more than one arrow, so I focus on making my first shot the best it can be and see how it ends up. I usually take my first shot at 20 yards because that is my most likely shot in the woods. Then I take a shot at 30, 40 and 50 yards then if time allows another shot back down at each distance back down to 20. So at most right there I’m sending 7 arrows out at varying distances and keeping check of my for the whole way.

PSE's Will Jenkins Tree Stand

PSE’s Will Jenkins Tree Stand

This quick practice a couple of times per week helps me ensure that my bow is in good shape, my form is consistent and it definitely helps my confidence when headed to the stand. I also try to mix in some shots from a tree stand in my back yard just to make sure that I’m still hitting where I think when shooting from elevation. While we’re heading into the end of the season, if you’re still carrying a bow to the woods it’s no time to get lazy and stop practicing!

Will Jenkins is creator of TheWilltoHunt.com and Harnesses For Hunters. He’s an avid outdoorsman who enjoys sharing his experiences through his blog. He also writes for Bow Adventures e-Magazine and is a member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association.< em>Will lives in Central Virginia with his wife and two kids. He hunts in Virginia and Maryland but has dreams of heading west to hunt Elk and Mule Deer.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Jared Bloomgren Spot and Stalking Part II


By Jared Bloomgren

Jared goes over terrain features and counts the various features to be sure where he is at once he starts the stalk.

Jared goes over terrain features and counts the various features to be sure where he is at once he starts the stalk.

In my last blog I covered the spotting portion and now let’s get to the really really fun part; STALKING!

After I have glassed up an animal that I want to stalk I come up with a plan of how to kill that animal. Things to consider:
1. Is the animal in a stalk-able situation?
2. Are the winds and/or thermals right?
3. Is the terrain and/or concealment adequate and passable?
4. Is there enough time in the day to complete the stalk?
5. Do you know the terrain? What is between you and the animal that you have to overcome?
6. The animal’s behavior?
Is the animal in a stalk-able situation?

I look at the animals location and can quickly determine if the stalk is do-able or not by looking at various things.

Are the winds and/or thermals rights?

Knowing the way thermals work in the area you are hunting is very important. Knowing when thermals switch directions and prevailing winds in the area are very important. This will determine which way you go about the stalk. And sometimes you may not be able to do the stalk because the winds are not correct and the terrain doesn’t give you the concealment needed for the wind direction. Wind direction and thermals will always dictate which direction you go at the animal. Sometimes that direction will not allow you a stalk because of the terrain.

Is the terrain/concealment adequate?

Think about an animal bedded on an open ridge with a gentle facing slope versus an animal bedded below a cut bank or cliff. It is obvious which one warrants a better stalk. Pick apart the terrain around the animal and find which route offers you the concealment and terrain features needed to get close enough for a shot. What is the ground like? Is it noisy? Will dry and crunchy twigs, branches, grass or even snow make it difficult? Using something to cover up noise is very important. I like to slip on “Sneaky Pete Feet” over my boots or remove my boots altogether and slip on extra socks. This will greatly cover up the noise you may make. Another thing to consider during this time is if you can approach the animal from above or below. Generally speaking an animal will be facing downhill and it seems that they usually expect danger to come from below. If possible I will always try to complete my stalk by coming from above. You need to determine if the wind direction and thermals will allow this. If not, coming from below is not out of the question either. It usually just takes more work.

Various changes in terrain make a stalk more difficult.

Various changes in terrain make a stalk more difficult.

Is there enough time in the day to complete the stalk?
Stalks can vary greatly on how much time it will take to complete. I have had stalks that took only one hour and on the other end of the spectrum I have had stalks that have taken over 8 hours to complete. There are so many factors that come into play. I have run out of daylight before and was forced to back out of the stalk entirely. Knowing if you have enough time will help you determine if you should pursue or wait until another day. For example, this fall I found a large mule deer buck bedded in an area where I felt I could close the distance before it got dark. I had 2 1/2 hours to kill that buck and I thought I had plenty of time. Unfortunately for me I didn’t study the terrain enough to notice that there were some very large cuts between me and that buck that I couldn’t see. It caused me to run out of daylight and had to back out and wait for another opportunity, another day…….hopefully!

One you get into the cedar trees it can be easy to loose track.

One you get into the cedar trees it can be easy to loose track.

Do you know the terrain? What is between you and the animal that you have to overcome?

That was a problem on that stalk. I didn’t judge the terrain accurately causing me to run out of daylight. It is very important while planning your stalk that you know what kind of terrain is between you and that animal. I often times study a topographic map so I know exactly what is between us. On that hunt I did not have my map and the various cuts and terrain changes were not visible. I know the stalk would have been successful given more time to complete it. If I would have known I simply would not have tried the stalk. Next time……hopefully! Before setting off I also like to pick some terrain features that will help me decide where I am at during the stalk. These will help keep me on track at any given time. When you get under way things will look much different when you are completing the stalk. It is mind blowing how much the look and lay of the land seems to change from what you remember when you were perched high on your vantage point. Having terrain features to reference is very important. Terrain features that are easy to identify and stand out will help you along the way.

Stalking a deer below this distant ridge requires paying particular attention to what the thermals are doing.

Stalking a deer below this distant ridge requires paying particular attention to what the thermals are doing.

The animal’s behavior?

How is the animal acting? If the animal is calm and close to taking a nap that will greatly increase the odds of you making him take a dirt nap! If the animal is very skittish and nervous he will likely be on the lookout for any kind of danger! All ungulates know that in order to survive they need to be on the lookout at all times. With coyotes, wolves, bears, lions, and humans they are constantly scanning for the unknown danger. I always let an animal calm down before closing the final portion of the stalk, the “Red Zone.”

That is the low down and dirty fun part. To this day I still learn something on each and every stalk. There is one small section left and that is what I like to call the “Red Zone.” The final 100 yards to that animal. On my next blog I will talk about the “Red Zone.”

Jared “J-Rod” Bloomgren is a hardcore Do-It-Yourself bowhunter who strives to better himself each year in the outdoor community. As a professional hunter, freelance writer and photographer, he likes to relive his outdoor adventures through written expression and photography making the reader feel as if they were along on the hunt. He attributes much of his success to the vital education he has learned from the various big game animals that he hunts. He is quoted as saying, “In each and every hunt, success or defeat, I learn something from every outing and that I can put in my arsenal of knowledge to use at a later date, a later date that will again put my wits against that of my prey.”

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson is Planning For Next Season


Places to hunt

Places to hunt

It’s that time of year again. Deer season is coming to a close for most areas of the country. Accolades have been echoed across social media circles to those who have punched their tag. Proud pictures of smiling hunters next to their deer in the field have been posted everywhere possible online. You would think that hunters across the country would be relieved that the season is over; there is time to now sit back, enjoy a big juicy venison steak dinner and relax for the next several months. But to be honest, I know that is not the case. At least not for me. Yes, I’m eating a steak dinner, but I’m dreaming about the next season while savoring each bite… And so the planning begins. By the end of December or mid-January, I’m already thinking about opening day 2013. Non-hunters may not understand that the beginning of a new calendar year simply begins the count down for when we can do it all again. The end of one season simply marks the beginning of preparation for the next. And if you’re like me, there are several things that need to be weighed during this process.

So, sit back, grab a piece of freshly dried venison jerky and let’s consider together the WHERE, WHEN and WHO for next season hunts. Some of these overlap a bit, but that is because each decision factors into the other in some capacity… First on the list… WHERE to hunt next year. How do you decide where your hunting adventures for the upcoming year will occur? The two biggest things I personally consider each year when considering where I’ll be hunting are my budget, and my bucket-list. Here is a breakdown of what that looks like:

• BUDGET – My budget for the next year is first up for consideration. I know it sounds simple, because if you don’t have the funds for a tag, then you simply don’t have the funds. However, there are sometimes some options here. My husband and I budget throughout the year to be able to apply for and/or buy our tags for the next year. However, not all of your tags need to be bought at the same time. If you plan and do your research, you can lay out good plan of which tags will need to be paid for ahead of time (draw), and which can be bought as over-the-counter. This helps to ultimately spread out the cost over several months. If you are applying for out-of-state tags, that is where the punch to the wallet will occur. However, there are some options here also. Most of the time you can use a credit card to apply for the tag and the cost of the tag will usually only hit your card if you draw the tag. Of course, the best option is to have the funds ahead of time, but using a credit card is a great way to build points if you know that you won’t actually draw the tag for a few years.
• BUCKET LIST – Each year, I consider the big hunts that I want to do someday, and make an effort to be one-step closer to making it happen. Does it mean applying for a tag to build preference points? Does it mean that I simply need to buckle down and start saving more towards my goal? Either way, if you make an effort to be one-step closer to your goal, the likelihood of crossing that dream hunt off your bucket list has a better chance of becoming a reality. Plan for it.
Next up on the list… WHEN will I be hunting next year. This depends on the tag that is drawn. Along with that, there are couple factors to consider when planning the WHEN of your hunt:

Hunting Plans

Hunting Plans

• TIME – This isn’t as much of an issue for some as others. For example, I am fortunate to have several weeks of vacation that I can devote to hunting each year, but that also means that I need to be disciplined and not use it up during the summertime months which is sometimes very tempting! My husband is blessed even more and is able to take off several months…one for elk season and one for whitetail. Depending on how much time you have factors in to how many tags you’ll be able to buy. For example, I consider whether I will be able to spend the time needed if I draw that once-in-a lifetime moose tag this year, or would it be smarter to just put in for preference points instead? As a hunter, I’ve found that it is important to budget my vacation time well in advance so that by the time season opener rolls around, I’m not stuck with an expensive tag in my pocket and no time to hunt.
• SEASON LENGTH – After you’ve established how much time you have, then think about exactly when during each season you’ll be hunting based on the length of the season. Some tags are only valid for a week timeframe, so that is usually a no-brainer. However, for archery elk or whitetail, the season typically last for a month or several months. Therefore, how do you decided exactly when to hunt? I’m not going to list all the pros and cons of early versus late season here or even tell you which is better since there are many personal preferences in this area. Rather, I’ll just point out there are many things to think about when considering your season length and which dates you will focus on hunting: timing of the rut, moon phases, hunting pressure, overlap of other seasons, weather, etc.

PSE's Emily Anderson's Base Camp

PSE’s Emily Anderson’s Base Camp

Finally, Troy and I review WHO we will be hunting with during the upcoming year.
• LOCATION – A huge factor in determining where you will be hunting is figuring out who you will be hunting with. You almost need to consider this first before anything else. Some questions to think about… Will you be hunting with someone new? Do you trust them with your secret hunting hole? Do they match your physical ability? Are they prepared for a backcountry hunt both physically and mentally? If hunting with a regular hunting friend, are you on the same page on where you will be hunting? Discussing this way ahead of the game is key to a successful hunt.
• BASE CAMP – It is never too early to begin thinking about camping arrangements. If you are hunting with a big group, then start planning for a location that has plenty of room and easy access for everyone. If hunting in a smaller group or solo hunting, now is the time to begin going through your gear, doing inventory for next year, and budgeting for the necessary gear you want to add to your pack for the next mountain adventure.
That is my high-level planning list. Let me know what you think! Remember, it’s never too early to plan your next hunt. Good luck in the upcoming year. Happy planning and hunting!

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.
 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Pedro Ampuero Red River Hunting


By Pedro Ampuero
http://www.adventurousbowhunter.com/

This summer I went hunting with my dad to the Artic Red River in NWT, Canada.
We hunted hard for ten days, in which all we need was on our packs. It is an amazing feeling to spend more than a week with just your guide, a pack and your bow. You pack every morning the camp, and keep moving forward in search of rams. You don’t leave anything behind, no reason of looking back, just keep moving forward to discover new land. That feeling of freedom is probably what I liked most.

PSE's Pedro Ampuero

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero

At the same time, the place is overwhelming. It is a rough landscape, with little more than rocks and grass, but so pure and wild, that makes it really beautifull and special.

Caribu

Caribu

We covered a lot of ground, both with our legs and also with the binos in search of the right ram and it all came together the last day of the hunt. An unreal feeling to see the ram rolling down after all the effort put behind..

PSE's Pedro Ampuero's Dall Sheep

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero’s Dall Sheep

It is the most beautifull hunt I have ever done. I could be writing about it for months! I dreamed about this hunt my whole life, and at the end it was even better than I had imagine. I hope everyone could try it one day.

Pedro's Full Pack

Pedro’s Full Pack

Good luck all in the mountains!
Pedro Ampuero

Pedro Ampuero was raised in Spain, a country full of hunting opportunities in which the hunting season goes year round. He spends many days each year in the field and traveling the world in search of new adventures. You will always find him outdoors scouting, hunting, filming or tracking with his Bavarian bloodhound.

Pedro is a mechanical engineer by trade and a bowhunter by heart. He is the co-founder of the blog AdventurousBowhunter.com and Cazandoconarco.es and has written many articles for the hunting industry and currently collaborates with the most prestigious companies on the industry.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Five More Secrets to Scouting for Deer Before the Season with PSE’s Mark Drury


PSE’s Mark Drury

Editor’s Note: Mark Drury of Saint Peters, Missouri, the founder of M.A.D. Calls, co-owner of Drury Outdoor Productions with his brother Terry and a long-time avid bowhunter also is a member of PSE’s Pro Hunt team. This season Mark will be shooting the new PSE Dream Season EVO.

Secret No. 6: You’ve got to have good glass to scout for bucks. I want to stay at least 400-yards away from the fields that I’m scouting. For this reason, I’ll usually use 10X binoculars when I’m scouting and/or use a spotting scope. Eastern hunters don’t take advantage of spotting scopes nearly as much as western hunters do, and you’ll rarely see an eastern hunter scout with a spotting scope or 10X binoculars. However, remember, the further you stay away from the deer, the less human odor you’ll introduce to your hunting site, and the better your odds are for taking an older-age-class buck. Too, by using quality binoculars and spotting scopes, you can spend more time scouting from your truck, which keeps your human odor in your vehicle. I use a window-mount device for my spotting scope to mount the scope on the window.

Secret No. 7: I’ll begin to move tree stands or set-up new tree stands, as I learn more about the deer from my scouting program. I hang many tree stands on the farm I hunt during January and February, after deer season. Then, during July and August, I go check these tree stands to make sure they’re still safe and secure. I hang new tree stands, so that I will have stands in the location where the deer will be traveling in the beginning of bow season. The two factors that determine the day I will hang a tree stand are weather conditions and time of day. In the summer months, I try to hang my tree stand in the middle of the day when the weather is hottest, and when I’m almost certain rain will come in the afternoon. Because hot weather helps evaporate human odor, and a rain washes it away, I know that my human odor won’t linger long, and the rain will wash away what human odor I do leave. I wear long pants and long-sleeved shirts made of breathable material when I’m going through the woods. I want all of the stands I’m going to hunt from during the upcoming deer season to be in place by the middle of August or the first of September. This way when I start bowhunting in October and November, I’ll have fresh stands to hunt from that don’t have any human odor associated with them.

Secret No. 8: My brother Terry and I have several farms we hunt. Before the season comes in, we try to have 80- to 100-tree stands in place and ready to hunt from on these farms. With that many stand sites, there’s no way we can remember or find all of them. We plot out every tree-stand site with GPS. We log each stand site into the GPS and give each one a name. We also record all of our stand site names, location and every wind direction that the stand can be hunted from on paper. By using this method, we can turn on our computer in the morning and go to www.weather.com to learn what wind direction we will have that day in our area. Then we check our list of stand sites and see which stands we can hunt with a favorable wind. Once we have decided the stand sites we can hunt from, we pick-out the stand where we believe our chances are best for taking a buck that day. Then, we pull that stand site up in our hand-held GPS, go straight to it in the dark, get into the tree and are ready to hunt before daylight.

Secret No. 9: I begin to pick the bucks I want to hunt from the motion-sensor-camera information and from observing the deer in the field. The bucks I’ll try to hunt aren’t always going to be the biggest bucks I see. The secret is determining from the bucks you have identified which bucks appear on the trails the most often during daylight hours. Some bucks have a tendency not to move until after dark. If you attempt to hunt these bucks, you can hunt several days and not see those bucks during daylight hours. However, if you hunt for the bucks that have a tendency to move-down trails and be in the green fields during daylight hours, you drastically increase your odds for taking a buck during the first week of bow season. Once I identify these bucks, I may move some of the cameras and my tree stand to learn all I can about these individual bucks I’ve decided to hunt. Knowing which bucks move during daylight hours gives me a tremendous advantage when hunting season opens. I can learn which bucks move the most during daylight hours by scouting during the summer using binoculars, spotting scopes and motion-sensor cameras without spending much time in the woods and alerting or spooking the deer.

Secret No. 10: I want to find the best spot to take the buck I want to hunt and know where he is living and moving during bow season. If I try to take him over the green field or the agricultural crop, I may spook him and the other deer that are coming to that food source. I’ve learned from my motion-sensor cameras that most bucks will move to water before they’ll go to feed. My brother Terry and I have learned that often the most-productive place to have a tree stand site for older-age-class bucks in the early season is along the trail that the bucks use when they’re going to water.

To learn more about Mark and Terry Drury and Drury Outdoors, visit http://www.druryoutdoors.com/.

For more bowhunting tips, check-out “Bowhunting Deer: The Secrets of the PSE Pros,” a new eBook for Amazon Kindle by John E. Phillips. You also can go to http://www.amazon.com/kindle-ebooks and type-in the name of the book to find it. Too, you can download a free Kindle app that enables you to read the book on your iPad, computer or SmartPhone.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Five Secrets to Scouting for Deer Before the Season with PSE’s Mark Drury


Mark Drury

PSE’s Mark Drury

Editor’s Note: Mark Drury of Saint Peters, Missouri, the founder of M.A.D. Calls, co-owner of Drury Outdoor Productions with his brother Terry and a long-time avid bowhunter also is a member of PSE’s Pro Hunt team. This season Mark will be shooting the new PSE Dream Season EVO.

Secret No. 1: I plant green fields with Mossy Oak’s BioLogic in areas where I have easy access with my truck to study the green fields, but I don’t plan to hunt them. I plant long narrow strips that are invisible from a public road but very visible from a woods road. During the summer months, the wind direction in our section of the country often is a south wind. I want these long fields to be where I can either walk-in or drive-in and scout these fields with a south wind, so the deer won’t be able to smell me. I plant two different types of green fields. One is what I call an observation field, which allows me to see the deer on the property during the summer months that I have to hunt. The other field is what I call my hidey-holes. I plan to actually take the bucks from these green fields that are planted in or near thick cover. The way you plant your green fields determines whether you’ll be able to scout successfully for deer season or not.

Secret No. 2: I start hunting a buck in July when the buck’s antlers are just beginning to develop. One of the secrets to consistently taking bucks is knowing which green fields bucks are coming to, and which green fields does prefer. I plant BioLogic in the spring, so I’ll have summer green fields where the deer can feed. I go to these fields in July to identify the trails the deer are using to come into those green fields and put RECONYX motion-sensor cameras along these trails to get pictures of the bucks coming to the green fields. Then I know which green fields each buck is utilizing. Trail-monitoring cameras enable a hunter to find big bucks, and to know where they’re moving quickly and easily and what time of the day or night they’re moving and how big the deer are. Even when I’m scouting, I wear camouflage.

Secret No. 3: Deer change their nutritional needs from green fields to soybean fields, as the summer progresses in Missouri, my home state. One of the keys to scouting is noticing when the deer switch their feeding patterns and then moving your motion-sensor cameras to new trails to keep-up with deer movement. When the Missouri deer leave my green fields and go to soybean fields in August, I change my cameras from the green fields and put them on trails leading to soybean fields and other agricultural crops to learn which bucks are going to these fields. For trail cameras to be effective, you have to move the cameras as the deer change food sources. If you do, you can keep-up with the location of the bucks on the property and watch these bucks’ antlers grow and develop. Another advantage to using the trail cameras is that you disturb the area where you plan to hunt very little. All I have to do to scout efficiently is go to the trail camera and change-out the film, which means I have little human impact on the deer.

Secret No. 4: You must know when to go to the cameras. During the summer months, as I’ve said earlier, the deer will move very little. I’ve learned I usually won’t get more than four or five pictures of deer per day on a good trail during July and August. So, I don’t spend nearly as much time in my hunting area getting the pictures. Another big advantage this method of scouting gives me is that I’m scouting every day from 10- or 20-different locations and not leaving any human scent in those regions. I’m not pressuring the deer that I plan to hunt in the fall during the summer months. In addition to wearing camouflage clothing, I usually wear a head net and gloves when visiting my cameras. I want to get to the cameras as quickly and as quietly as possible, leave as little human odor I can and be invisible to the deer.

Secret No. 5: I like to actually see the deer, especially the bucks I’ll be hunting in the fall, besides using the trail-timer camera. But once again, I want to see the buck from a distance and not disturb him by getting too close. I’ve learned from my motion-sensor cameras that the first 10 days of a full moon is when I’ll see the most big bucks coming to a green field late in the afternoon. I’ll take advantage of the deer’s reaction to the phases of the moon during the summer months, just as much as I do during the fall and winter months. I want to see the bucks on the green field to try and determine their personalities and their temperaments. Some bucks will be very bold, while other bucks will be very skittish. Some bucks will walk right out in the middle of a green field, while other bucks will hold on the edge. By being able to study the bucks through binoculars or spotting scopes from a long distance, I can learn the personality of each buck. If you’re going to go to a green field and study the bucks, you’ll want to go to that field when the most bucks will be on it. I’ve learned that not only most of the bucks, but more importantly most of the big bucks that are using a green field will be out in that green field early in the afternoon for 10 days after a full moon.

To learn more about Mark and Terry Drury and Drury Outdoors, visit http://www.druryoutdoors.com/.

For more bowhunting tips, check-out “Bowhunting Deer: The Secrets of the PSE Pros,” a new eBook for Amazon Kindle by John E. Phillips. You also can go to http://www.amazon.com/kindle-ebooks and type-in the name of the book to find it. Too, you can download a free Kindle app that enables you to read the book on your iPad, computer or SmartPhone.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Building friendships through bow hunting


By Albert Quackenbush
Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Glassing

It’s a rare event when I want to crawl back into bed on a hunt morning, but today was one of those days. I was just plain tired and the bed felt super comfortable, plus it was 2:00 AM on a Saturday. Fortunately, I snapped out of it quick because while it may have been early, it was time to bow hunt!

Brett and I made it to the trail head at 4:15 Am, which was exactly the time we wanted to arrive. There was a 3/4 moon, so we got to do something I have never done before; hike into our spot by moonlight. Our headlamps remained off on the nearly two mile journey into our destination. We were both happy that the temperature was 46 degrees as that made our hike in much more enjoyable. After dropping Brett off, I made my way to my glassing location, which was a Ridgeland that gave a spectacular view of the valley below. Sunrise wasn’t until 6:30 AM, but the moon was so bright that I was able to start glassing the ridges at 5:45 AM. It was amazing!

Albert Quackenbush

Brett glassing a distant hillside for deer

Sharing public land with rifle hunters is something every bow hunter must do. On this particular morning, the rifle hunters were out in full force. Around 7:00 AM, I received a text from Brett that he had spotted some does on a ridge. Quickly picking them out through my binoculars, I waited to see what they would do. As they walked down a trail, all they needed to do was turn right and they would be in bow range for Brett. They had other plans and turned left.

Hunter safety is something I am passionate about in my bow hunting seminars. In the state of California, it is not mandatory for any deer hunter to wear blaze orange. When archery and rifle seasons coincide, I am always wearing some sort of orange to let other hunters know where I am. Forty-five minutes after sunrise, Brett informed me that another hunter was near his location and had no idea he was there. Brett and I were both wearing blaze orange hats and this hunter had absolutely no orange on. I watched as the hunter took the ridge I was glassing from and started to hike it right toward me. I made the decision to stand right up and make sure he noticed me. Not only did I not want to be mistaken for a deer, but I also wanted him to know that I was hunting this ridge. He finally noticed me, turned around and stopped near Brett again. He then noticed Brett, waved and found another position. It was a tense situation because we didn’t want any confrontation nor did we want anyone shooting in our direction.

Albert Quackenbush

Deer on the nearby ridge

We glassed and waited patiently for a buck or a doe to walk into range. After two hours of waiting, a shot rang out in one of the canyons. I watched four doe take off from where the shot came from. Anticipating them running up the ridge I was on, I got ready. Like the two does from earlier, they went the other way. Within the next few minutes, we watched as four other hunters met up with the shooter. By his actions, we could tell he had a buck down. Brett made his way over to my location and we glassed the canyons as the hunter’s field dressed their deer. Seeing nothing, we hiked into an adjacent bowl.

We hiked and glassed and hike some more. We ran into more rifle hunters and still had smiles on our faces. Why? We were bow hunting and having a great time being in the great outdoors. As we made our way through drainage I spotted a forkie shed. It was a great reminder on why we were hiking our tails off.

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush found Small forkie shed in drainage

The weather was perfect, but the deer were nowhere to be found. We did find another hunter taking a nap under a shaded bush. We chatted with him for a few minutes and then continued hiking. Beside the other hunters, we soon realized we were not the only predators in the forest. Right in the middle of the trail we found these mountain lion tracks that had been made that morning. It gave us an uneasy feeling, but the worst part was the cat had decided to head right into the area we were headed. Now all bets were off as we turned back to find a shaded spot to relax for a couple of hours.

Albert Quackenbush

Mountain lion track

The evening hunt was a bust, but on the hike out it was evident that both Brett and I enjoyed the day. Breathing in the fresh air, burning boot rubber, and seeing some beautiful country while bow hunting made it a great day. All in all, we encountered eleven rifle hunters throughout the day. Not a single one of them had a stitch of orange on. I encourage all of you bow hunters to be safe out there and to try to anticipate situations you will encounter. No matter what, have fun and be safe out there!

Albert Quackenbush has been bowhunting for more than 28 years. He shares his adventures on his blog, www.SoCalBowhunter.com, and also writes for Bow Adventures e-magazine. He is a Pro Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com, Piranha Custom Bowstrings and Field Logic. He is a member of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, California Deer Association, and is a Life Member of the North American Hunting Club.

Albert was born and raised in New York State where he learned to hunt everything from squirrels to whitetail deer. He currently resides in Southern California with his wife and daughter and hunts year round.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Dustin Jones Hunting- A Positive Influence


By Dustin Jones
Dustin Jones and Son Fynch

PSE’s Dustin Jones and Son Fynch

There are numerous reasons why I enjoy bowhunting. I love being outdoors and taking in all that nature has to offer. There is something about walking through the woods with a bow in your hand in search of an animal that cannot be described. For me hunting in general has much deeper meaning.

When I was younger and just starting to hunt, my dad taught me not only about hunting but values that would carry over into my everyday life. There have been countless times when my dad and I would sit and talk about life and what’s on our mind while we would glass the hillside or eat lunch under a big pine tree. I was able to tell my dad anything and know that I had his full attention; well unless we heard an elk bugle off in the distance then we both would get distracted. Some of the greatest memories that I have with my dad are while we have been out hunting.

Keegan and Brock

As a family, we love sharing our passion for the outdoors with those around us. I remember when we started introducing one of my cousins to hunting because he had asked my dad to take him. He was pretty quiet and at times timid but you could tell that he was excited to be out there. As we began teaching him about being persistent, determined, and patient you could tell he was just a sponge soaking it all in. Soon he was breaking out of his shell and being more open with us after several trips.

Keegan and his Ducks and Goose

It didn’t take him long to get hooked. He loves to hunt and has just as strong of a passion for it as we do. He would talk about it and want to go as often as he could, in fact he would hurry home after school and sit in his tree stand for a couple hours before diner. After a while his dad started to show interest in getting back into hunting. He had not been hunting in years but wanted to spend that time with his son. As they started going hunting together, his two younger boys started showing interest in going hunting with him as well. It is great to see them all get out and enjoy hunting together. All I can think about is those times that I spent with my dad out in the woods and think how neat it was to see them do the same.

PSE’s Dusin Jones Father and Weston

The memories that I have with my dad are some that I will never forget. I am grateful for the lessons that I have learned and for the bond that it has formed within our family. Introducing a child to hunting is a rewarding experience and you never know the impact it may have on their lives. As I take my kids hunting I hope to create memories with them that they will never forget.

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.

Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Will Jenkins “Why I Chose the Vendetta”


By Will Jenkins
http://www.thewilltohunt.com/

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins Vendetta

The PSE line up is a big one with a ton of great bows. They are all unique and offer something slightly different but it can be overwhelming. So I took to the internet reading everything I could about the various bows. I like a decent brace height and ATA. I like bows to be forgiving and comfortable. Eventually I was deciding between the EVO 7 and the Vendetta. As a bowhunter I wanted something smooth. I like being able to easily draw my bow smoothly when hunting.

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins Bow

After reading as much as I could I decided the Vendetta was my best shot at a smooth bow with a good brace height and still gets some good speed with my short draw length. With no pro shops close by I’m usually limited by my research and while I’m a huge proponent of shooting what feels good to you, I got lucky on this one. Once my Vendetta came in I frantically called and texted my good friend Tim Johnson so we could get together to set my bow up. Tim is an ace with a bow and by the time he was done with my Vendetta, it was a perfect fit.

I picked the Vendetta for it smooth draw and it definitely delivered. I can’t get enough of shooting this bow it’s simply that good. The smooth draw and solid back wall make it easy to draw undetected and stay at full draw for a long time if needed. For those reasons I have it at around 65 pounds of draw weight. With the Vendetta’s draw cycle it barely feels like I’m drawing any weight at all and I can stay at full draw for a long time with little fatigue. While speed is good these are the most important factors to me as a bowhunter. Speed is great but doesn’t do much good if I can’t get the bow drawn and hold it there when needed.

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins X Force Vendetta

I outfitted my Vendetta with the Aries sight, PSE X 5 Arrow Quiver and an 8″ 9oz Vibracheck Omega Stabilizer. All the pieces come together nicely to make a great shooting bow. I’m extremely impressed with my 2012 Vendetta and can’t wait to see how the 2013 models shoot.

Will Jenkins is creator of TheWilltoHunt.com and Harnesses For Hunters. He’s an avid outdoorsman who enjoys sharing his experiences through his blog. He also writes for Bow Adventures e-Magazine and is a member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association.

Will lives in Central Virginia with his wife and two kids. He hunts in Virginia and Maryland but has dreams of heading west to hunt Elk and Mule Deer.
 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


How do you know which eye is dominant? – Q & A w/ PSE’s Bobby V


Bobby V brings in PSE Pro Staff Chuck Cooley to answer a question about how to determine eye dominance.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Spot & Stalk Tactics by PSE’s Jared Bloomgren


By Jared Bloomgren

Jared Bloomgren

PSE’s Jared Bloomgren Cold Morning Glassing

Like stated in an earlier blog my favorite type of hunting tactic is spot and stalk. This type of hunting pits your wits against that of your prey more than any other style of hunting in my opinion. The name of this tactic is self explanatory really. First you spot your prey and then you stalk them. Fitting name for it isn’t it?! This will be split into two blogs. First part will be spotting with the second part being the stalking portions on my next blog.

Jared Bloomgren

PSE’s Jared Bloomgren Scouting Above Treeline

During the spotting process I like to be on a high vantage point to help me glass as much of the terrain as possible. Often times you may be glassing at distant areas over a mile away or more! This calls for quality optics and the better quality optics you have the better off you will be. Your eyes will not fatigue as fast and you may avoid a headache at the end of the day! I like to use the Vortex Optics Razor HD line. My binoculars are 10x42mm while my spotting scope is 20-60x80mm which allows me to see those very distant areas. I will also be selling Vortex Optics at competitive prices on my website at http://www.triggeraddiction.com soon as well.

Glassing animals is not always the easiest to do. Animals that are lying out in the clear wide open are generally pretty easy to find but there are times when they remain hidden fairly well. At first look it may seem that there are no animals in the immediate glassing area but usually that isn’t true. Glassing requires patience and persistence because sometimes you may not see animals right away. You will need to look for something that doesn’t belong with its surroundings. Often times I have spotted a buck or bull by catching a glimpse of an antler because of the glare caused by the sun. Looking for lines that do not blend or match; an antler tip sticking out from the brush, a leg from under a tree, the outline of an animal’s back, etc…When I get frustrated or my eyes get tired I take a quick break; stretch, grab a quick snack or drink and then get back at it. It is amazing how much this can help you re-focus.

Jared Bloomgren

Jared’s optics are vital to success

When glassing big country I like to come up with a system of how to do it. The areas I generally look at first are those areas that are obvious bedding areas. Looking for the areas that offer the cover and the shade are very important as these areas hold a higher probability of deer bedding there. During early season the shade is very important. I like to look at ledged, cliffs, bigger rocks, anything that will offer shade throughout the day. I have seen numerous mule deer simply move around a rock throughout the day to keep in the shade. If I am having trouble located animals I like to set up a grid and move through each area of that grid as not to miss anything along the way. This will ensure that you cover all the terrain and will also yield more found animals than if you were just glassing randomly across the terrain that you can see. By doing a grid search I have found that I am much more successful at finding more animals faster!

After finding an animal of your liking you need to decide if it is in a good situation to carry out a stalk. Things to consider are wind direction and thermals, terrain, the animal’s behavior, your capability, and the time of day. Many stalks require a lot of time but just like an earlier blog of mine; they require patience!

My next blog will focus on the bread and butter of the two! The stalking portion to bring the hunt full circle and things to consider when you are stalking.

Jared “J-Rod” Bloomgren is a hardcore Do-It-Yourself bowhunter who strives to better himself each year in the outdoor community. As a professional hunter, freelance writer and photographer, he likes to relive his outdoor adventures through written expression and photography making the reader feel as if they were along on the hunt. He attributes much of his success to the vital education he has learned from the various big game animals that he hunts. He is quoted as saying, “In each and every hunt, success or defeat, I learn something from every outing and that I can put in my arsenal of knowledge to use at a later date, a later date that will again put my wits against that of my prey.”

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Whitetail Passion by PSE’s Emily Anderson


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Midwest Hunt

Hunting whitetails is relatively new to me. My first opportunity to hunt whitetail in the Midwest was last year in 2011. I was thrilled to be able to shoot my first buck ever and came home with a nice little 8 point buck.

Since punching that first archery tag, I can officially say that I have caught the whitetail bug. I now understand the passion for hunting these deer that wander the farmlands, fields and woods in the Midwest. I was skeptical at first since I got my feet wet in the hunting world by learning to hunt in the mountains of Colorado. I was certain that I would be utterly board sitting in a tree stand just waiting for something to walk within bow range. Oh how I was wrong! I am now dreaming and scheming of how to obtain more opportunities to arrow bigger and better deer than I have previously.

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Climbing High

There is just something about climbing high up into a tree, knowing that your stand overlooks a field or trail where a scrape has just been visited below. You have a great vantage point for watching the sun creep up over the horizon. You are there before the birds start singing. As the world slowly awakens before you, the soft sweet sound of crunch crunch below signals that a deer is making their way through the woods. There is no stopping it, before even knowing if the sound is produced by a squirrel, doe or shooter buck, the adrenaline begins to pump through your veins.

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson

The memory is still fresh from the other weekend when I had the opportunity to arrow my second whitetail. The adrenaline has now worked its way through my body, but the recollection is still vivid. As the evening light began to fade and the minutes were counting down to the last shooting opportunity, a buck on the horizon made an appearance. He was a couple hundred yards off and following the scent-line that we had laid down earlier. As my husband, Troy, let out a few grunts and then a rattle sequence, the buck began to close the distance fast. I reached for my bow, releasing it from the tree hook, and prepared to draw back.

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Whitetail

As I mentally prepared for the shot, I picked a spot in the landscape where I would draw back if he crossed the line. The buck reached the designated stump and the strings on my PSE EVO were stretched. I now had a view through my peep sight which somehow calmed the previous shaking in my body. It was a rhythm I was used to from all the previous practice. The buck halted to a stop at the sound of one last grunt call. It was all I needed to pick a spot and settle my pin. Thwack! In an instant the broadhead did its job. We watched as the buck sped towards the ditch and never came out. He was piled up at the bottom, and I am proud to be able to say I shot him with my PSE!

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Pedro Ampuero Small Game


By Pedro Ampuero
http://www.adventurousbowhunter.com/

Pedro Ampuero

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero’s Rabbit

Small game hunting season started a few weeks ago here in Spain. It is one of my favorite times of the year, since I really love to see the dogs in action.

In Spain we can hunt a lot of different species, like quails, red partridge, woodcook, ducks, rabbits, pigeons, etc.. On the other hand, most of them are not made for doing it with bow and arrow.

Probably the most common hunted are rabbits. They are a lot of fun, and it’s a great way for introducing hunters in to archery. At the same time, it is also an outstanding practice for improving you stalking skills and focusing on small targets. I try to stalk rabbits every time I can. For hunting them I would suggest a speed bow that makes little sound on the release, since rabbits can really disappear before the arrow arrives to destination. My final advice, use a judo point or similar to avoid pass troughs, in order to try to recover the game easier.

Pedro Ampuero

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero Hunting

Quail is another animal that you can hunt with bow an arrow with the help of a pointing dog. By using a special broadhead composed of wires, we will have lots of fun trying to drop down a small quail from the air with and arrow. Traditional equipment makes it quicker to aim and release the arrow as soon as possible.

Finally, its getting more common between bowhunters to hunt red partridges during the rutting period with the help of a live decoy. The decoy will challenge other males and they will come to fight against it. It is really important to get the birds with the first arrow, since the decoy could lose its confidence and stop calling forever. Beautiful and challenging way of hunting!

Pedro Ampuero

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero Hunting Dog

Good luck all in the mountains!
Pedro Ampuero

Pedro Ampuero was raised in Spain, a country full of hunting opportunities in which the hunting season goes year round. He spends many days each year in the field and traveling the world in search of new adventures. You will always find him outdoors scouting, hunting, filming or tracking with his Bavarian bloodhound.

Pedro is a mechanical engineer by trade and a bowhunter by heart. He is the co-founder of the blog AdventurousBowhunter.com and Cazandoconarco.es and has written many articles for the hunting industry and currently collaborates with the most prestigious companies on the industry.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Tips on Target Practice By PSE’s Albert Quackenbush


By Albert Quackenbush
www.SoCalBowhunter.com

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Target Practice

Practice for the extreme if you want to down an animal with one clean shot. What do I mean by that? A few years ago, I was out scouting a month before the season and at 6:00 AM it was 89 degrees. At 6:00 AM!! Imagine what it would be like at 2:00 PM. Here the temperatures during hunting season can easily reach 100 degrees midday. It gets hot, you get sweaty and uncomfortable and you need to prepare yourself for it. Also, you really should practice at ranges you aren’t so comfortable with. Shoot out further and you’ll be surprised at how your accuracy will change at closer range. Here are steps I continually work on throughout the year when I am practicing to prepare myself for the extremes.

In the early part of the year you will find me practicing in shorts, a t-shirt and sneakers when I am at the range. It helps me loosen up and it’s comfortable! The same should go for you. Start off the year practicing in your comfortable clothes, no matter where you are. Make it enjoyable. As the weeks tick by, I will add more clothing during select sessions at the archery range. On some hot days (80+ degrees), I’ll clothe myself in my long-sleeve, long pant gear. I’ll wear my hunting boots, too. Why do I torture myself like this? Hunting in the high desert could mean shooting a deer when it’s 90 degrees. You really should practice in those extreme situations. I have also had clothing get tangled into my bow string and throw off my shot. Wear what you plan to hunt in from time to time and you’ll find instances like this that can be corrected early on.

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush 3D Practice

Sometime during the next few weeks I will add in a 3D target to the mix. While you can start with a regular target with dots to shoot at, in the field you won’t have a bulls eye to focus on. Buy a 3D target and practice with it as much as you can. For me, I shoot at a small javelina target. Have I ever hunted javelina? No, but the target area is very small and it leaves little room for error. I could try to pick up a moose target, but I want my shots tight and my confidence level as high as it can be. If you hunt deer exclusively, pick up a quality deer target. My shots greatly improved when I started shooting a 3D target.

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Target Practice Tips

Want to add some more fun to your target practice? Take an old sock and fill it with rags or more old socks. Prior washing optional! The more you stuff in the better the result will be. Once you have six or eight in, tie off the end with a knot. Success! Now you have yourself a small rabbit target to use at the range. Then, tip one of your arrows with a judo point made for small game hunting. Start shooting at the rabbit a few times during each session. Keep track of your range and how you improve over time. You might surprise yourself how confident you will become and how far out you can hit that small bundle of socks.

Keep in mind that you must also prepare yourself for failure. Without failure there can be no improvement. Even after 28 years of experience with archery I still miss my mark once in a while. I am not perfect and I have bad days at the range, too. Just a few weeks ago, I was shooting with my friends and we were shooting at sixty yards with deadly accuracy. During our round of six arrows each, I drew my bow, settled my pin, and let the arrow fly. Immediately I knew it was off the mark as I felt he bow torque in my hand just as I released. My arrow went right over the 3D target and buried itself in the thick grass behind it. Was I dejected? You bet I was! How had I missed? No matter what I thought, I had to stay positive. It was what I did next that mattered most. Instead of beating myself up for missing, I went back to shooting and focused. I found my anchor point, settled the pin, squeezed the trigger on my release and buried an arrow deep into the vitals of the javelina. My practice session ended where it should have – on a successful shot.

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush

In closing I have one very important tip to ensure continued success. Once your arm gets tired, stop practicing. You can make bad judgments followed by avoidable mistakes if you continue to push yourself. Instead, go rest or pack up and prepare yourself to come back another day. I had to learn the hard way and now whenever my arm gets tired I am done. Remember that when shooting at an animal it is the first arrow that is the most important, not the last.

Albert Quackenbush has been bowhunting for more than 28 years. He shares his adventures on his blog, www.SoCalBowhunter.com, and also writes for Bow Adventures e-magazine. He is a Pro Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com, Piranha Custom Bowstrings and Field Logic. He is a member of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, California Deer Association, and is a Life Member of the North American Hunting Club.

Albert was born and raised in New York State where he learned to hunt everything from squirrels to whitetail deer. He currently resides in Southern California with his wife and daughter and hunts year round.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Dustin Jones Practice Techniques


Dustin Jones
http://www.highcountrybowhunter.com/

Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones Practice

We have all heard the saying “practice makes perfect.” While I believe this to be true, I feel like there is more to practice than just practice itself. Shooting your bow often will help strengthen the muscles that are being used as well as building the muscle memory. Now don’t get me wrong, this is all good practice but here are a few ways to become a better archery hunter.

1. Set Up in Different Scenarios

Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones Sister in law

As nice as it would be to always have an animal come in at 20 yards and stand there broadside with nothing between you or them, let’s be honest, it doesn’t always happen. Set Up several different realistic scenarios in which you think you might get a shot. When I am spot and stalk hunting for deer or elk, I need to use the trees, rocks, or sagebrush for cover. I try and recreate some of these situations by setting up my target and actually trying to sneak up on it and draw while trying to stay covered then slowly peek around and place an accurate shot.

2. Shoot How You’ll Hunt

Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones brother Travis Archery Shoot

this is one that I strive to focus a lot of my attention. There are different times of the year that you hunt which requires different clothing. This is why I practice often so as the seasons change, I will know how I shoot with certain layers on. Now building the muscle memory and being consistent in your form won’t change, but you may find that one extra layer could be getting hit by the string as you shoot so you need to add a shooting sleeve over that layer. It will feel different when you have a hunting pack on. There have been plenty of times when hiking in with my pack on I get an opportunity at an animal. By practicing with my pack on I have the confidence knowing I can make that shot.

3. Just Breathe

 Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones brother Kevin

Controlling your breathing is the most challenging aspects of hunting. I have troubles controlling my breathing no matter if it is a large bull elk or a whitetail doebut getting a handle on this will help you tremendously when the moment of truth comes. So how do you practice controlling your breathing? That is a really good question. What has worked for me is I sometimes do a light jog just to get my heart rate and breathing up then try to get it under control. Granted it’s not exactly the same but feeling your heart beat faster and breathing rate go up then try and shoot has helped me.

4. 3-D Archery

Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones 3-D Archery Shoot

I enjoy shooting traditional flat face targets, but some of the best practice is shooting 3-D targets. I am a member of my local archery club and they put on several 3-D archery shoots throughout the year prior to hunting season. This is a great way to practice and see where you should be aiming on certain animals indifferent positions. I would highly suggest getting a 3-D target to practice with and set it up in different scenarios.

These are some things that have helped me become a better archery hunter. So yes practice does make perfect, but it matters how you practice. Don’t do it for the sake of practicing. When you are out there, make it worth your time and have fun. I may look funny sneaking through my yard just to shoot a 3-D target, but it sure is a blast!

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.

Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Will Jenkins is Finding the Time


By Will Jenkins
http://www.thewilltohunt.com/

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins’ Finding Time- Evening Hunt

With the rut kicking in and holidays on the horizon, we are all scrambling to find time to hunt. This is a challenge for all hunters especially those of us that have kids and busy work schedules. Unless you are blessed with a ridiculous amount of paid vacation or you hunt for a living you must put effort into finding time to hunt.

While an all-day sit during the rut is great if you’re able to sneak out of work an hour or two early and stop by one of your hunting spots with just a couple hours before shooting light ends, do it. While activity is up during the day the bucks are still moving at dusk. They’ll start running around checking doe bedding areas. If you don’t have time to pack in a stand or climb a tree bring a stool or find a stump and just sit on the ground. While tree stands have their advantages when you’re in a hurry. They can be loud and slow you down.

Similarly, if you can get into work a little later you can get some good action right at day break. With day light savings time now, it’s a little harder to get in before it gets dark after woks so sneaking in, in the morning might be the ticket.

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins Hunting Sunset

For those of you with a spouse and kids, make it a family event. Give your spouse a break and take your kids with you hunting. Even if you don’t make a kill or even see anything you’re still out there introducing your kids to hunting and at the same time hopefully earning some brownie points for giving your spouse a little break.

I killed my first deer a small buck on a quick late morning hunt. It was a Saturday and Dad and I were slow getting up so we didn’t even get into the woods until after 9AM. Within an hour I spotted the buck and about 20 minutes later he was dead. So, I guess the lesson here is, find the time to get out even if it’s only a couple of hours and make it happen! Like so many always say, you can’t kill them from the couch!

Will Jenkins is creator of TheWilltoHunt.com and Harnesses For Hunters. He’s an avid outdoorsman who enjoys sharing his experiences through his blog. He also writes for Bow Adventures e-Magazine and is a member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association.

Will lives in Central Virginia with his wife and two kids. He hunts in Virginia and Maryland but has dreams of heading west to hunt Elk and Mule Deer.
 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


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