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Posts tagged “Bert Seelman

The Hunt of a Lifetime for Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep with PSE’s John May


John May

John May

Editor’s Note:  Forty eight year old John May of Arizona has been shooting PSE bows for almost 20 years and has enjoyed some great hunts to take a variety of animals with his different PSE bows.

I tried for 6 years to get a tag for a Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep in Colorado. I felt really lucky, because I know a lot of people have applied for that tag for 20 years or more and never have been drawn. I was one of two nonresidents to draw an archery tag that year. I was hunting unit F 32. I had read a lot about this unit in hunting reports, and I knew it contained a lot of sheep and mature rams. There were a very limited number of tags given for this unit, and the unit had produced a large number of high scoring rams. I had an outfitter who did a lot of scouting for me. I arrived at the unit a couple of days early, so I could glass the area I would be hunting with a spotting scope and large binoculars like the Swarovski 15×56. I also spent 3 months with a personal trainer, Bert Seelman, before I went. Eric Shum was going to accompany me on the hunt and film it, so he trained with me. In those 3 months, we were able to put on some muscle, lose some weight and get our legs and lungs in shape to try and tame the mountain. But, regardless of how good of shape you think you’re in, mountains always will take their toll on you. We were hunting between 5,550 feet of elevation and 14,000 feet. We hiked for about 7 days.

I’m often asked, “Why did you think spending 3 months with a personal trainer was important before your hunt”? My response is, “I’ve always worked out and tried to stay in shape.” But, when I was lucky enough to draw this once in a lifetime tag, I wanted to give myself the best possible chance to take a ram.” In sheep hunting, the first consideration is, can you physically get to the place where you need to be to take the shot? When you do a lot of mountain climbing at steep elevations, you have to be in really good shape, able to endure the terrain and mentally prepared for the hunt. By that, I mean climbing at steep elevations for several consecutive days means you’ll be tired and often mentally whipped. So, the better you can prepare for a hunt like this, the better your odds for success are. I realized this was a once in lifetime hunt. Even though I’d always done my own training, I knew I needed someone to push me to the outermost limits of my physical conditioning. Too, I wanted help with the dietary supplements I’d need to get my body to perform at a high level of physical activity over an extended number of days. After 3 months of working with the personal trainer, I felt like I was in the best physical and mental shape I could be in to go on this hunt.

When we finally arrived at the area and started glassing, we could see that most of the sheep were holding right at the tree line. We drove into Georgetown, Colorado, and went across the interstate from the unit I had drawn, to get up to some really high elevations to look for the sheep. If we saw a sheep we wanted to go after, we’d have to go down the mountain, cross the interstate, come into town and get on the other side of the highway to get into my unit. Then, we’d have to hike or ride horses over the top of a mountain, so we could see the base of the mountain where most of the sheep were holding. Each time we glassed, we usually saw about 8 or 10 rams. One time, we found a band of rams, and in that band, there was one ram that we guessed to be about 180 inches. He eventually got in a bachelor group of about 25 rams. I had a couple of stalks during the 7 day hunt, where I got in close to several different rams. However, then either the wind would switch and take my scent to the rams, or the thermals would change, and the rams would smell us and blow out of the area.

On the sixth day, I stalked in close to six rams. The big 180 class ram I wanted to take was in that group of five other rams. But, before I could get close enough for a shot, the ram winded us and went over the mountain. The next day, we had to spend half a day trying to find that band of rams again. Once we finally located them, we watched them feed and finally bed down. We used the terrain to hide our movements, as we moved up through some cracks and crevices in the mountain. Finally, we reached a spot above the rams. When we peeped over the top of the mountain, we saw a 160 ram standing on a rock outcropping. We’d hunted so hard and been so totally unsuccessful, that I was ready to shoot and take this ram. Although I would have been pleased to take that 160 ram, the ram I really wanted was that 180 incher, which also was with this band of rams. The 160 ram was well within range and looking straight at me from 40 yards away, but he was downhill. So, I realized I couldn’t shoot him with my 40 yard pin, but would have to shoot at him with a much closer pin. I aimed with my 20 yard pin. As I waited for that ram to turn his head to take a shot at him, the ram got nervous, and the 180 class ram pushed the 160 class ram off the rock where he’d been standing. Then the big ram stood in the very same spot as the other ram and looked down the mountain and away from me, while slightly quartering away. My 20 yard pin settled behind his shoulder, and I released the arrow. The big ram went about 30 yards down the mountain and piled up.

I was shooting the PSE Nitro at that time. I couldn’t have asked more of any bow. The shot was perfect going behind the shoulder and down and taking out the ram’s heart. My Nitro I was pulling was 70 pounds, I shot the PSE 300 arrow shaft, and the broadhead was a Rocket Hammerhead. When we reached the ram, we skinned and caped him, put the meat in game bags and hung it in trees. We placed the cape and horns on a pack frame and carried it back to camp   about a 2 1/2 hour hike. Then we returned the next morning and packed out the meat. The ram scored 178. The year I took him, he was the largest Rocky Mountain bighorn harvested with archery equipment in Colorado.

Tomorrow: PSE’s John May Hunts Arizona Buffalo After Waiting 20 Years for a Tag

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Immediately Increase Your Accuracy and Consistancy While Target Shooting


The Great Fitness Fraud

The Great Fitness Fraud

by Bert Seelman

How to Immediately Increase Accuracy with Repeatability!

Getting better accuracy in archery requires better implementation of certain basic skills. Being proficient at those skills requires certain physical abilities. For instance, the right strength in the right areas are essential. Strength and its proper use is something too often not adequately considered in many sports.

I met and have had the pleasure of working with Pete and Jon Shepley, owners of Precision Shooting Equipment, for over 30 years. They had employed me to help them with better conditioning for intense hunting conditions and health improvements. During this time I was also fortunate to be able to work with a lot of their Pro-staff, friends and other archers. One of the most standout observations I made was archers now and throughout history usually are and needed to be in good physical condition.

One of the first things I started to hear from most of the archers I met was about their ability to not just to shoot well, but to shoot well repeatedly. Repeatability of good shots was the goal whether it is for hunting, target, or even just for recreation.  Consistency it seemed was everything making the shot window (as it is called) the key area!

The time between when an archer draws their arrow and when it is released is called “the shot window.” The ability to hold the draw weight, be steady, concentrate and release without shaking or straining, is of major importance. Without this window being held without straining, shaking, quivering and then to not panic into release, is critical! If this is accomplished with ease and steady handedness the shot will be delivered with more concentration and consistency!

It is critical to position the body in the correct position while performing this task of drawing, holding, concentrating, and then releasing. The requirements are strength and knowledge. Of course we are considering the individual to already have good basic techniques. So let’s consider for now what is it that will give us the ability to repeat those good shots.

Anything that requires physical movement is made easier or more repeatable by strength! Even endurance depends on strength. When I say strength, it is important it should be considered only on an individual basis. To compare strength with two different individuals would serve no purpose as this would have too many genetic variables. So let’s do this in a way that would be as accurate as possible. We will use only one and the same person as an example.

Let us take an individual and test that person at two different levels of strength. The “not so obvious” is that the ability to do more repetitions would be when they are stronger. To show this let me give this clear example. Say our individual was capable of doing exactly timed repetitions at an exact distance for 20 reps with 300 pounds at their earlier level. Now let’s say at a later time we take this same individual when they are stronger and able to do these same distance and timed reps at a level of 20 reps for 600 pounds. Now let’s give this same individual only 150 pounds and tell them to do as many reps as possible to test their endurance. The individual will find they can do way more repetitions with the 150 pounds at the stronger or 600 pound level.

Why? Simple math shows the 150 pounds is only one fourth of the 600 pound level. However, the 150 pounds is actually one half of the lighter 300 pound level. Common sense and mathematical calculation show the higher your strength the less the weight is in proportion to the stronger level of ability. The ability to do more repetitions with a lesser resistance or weight is simply totally obvious. However, egos will always try to refute most everything..

Therefore, simple observation and self evident facts show us strength is endurance. However, only on an individual basis! When I am stronger I can do more reps than when I am not as strong. Not too difficult, huh?

Now let me state that strength has its limits also. However, by having this working knowledge, an archer or athlete can start to understand and work with these limitations to their advantage so they can excel far beyond their competition and enhance their own performance.

Now let’s start with the fact when a muscle is pushed or worked to a point of exhaustion or momentary failure, it recovers its ability in stages. When a muscle can no longer contract or pull at a level and then is rested for 3 seconds, it can deliver around 50% of its original strength or performance. When that same muscle is rested after momentary failure for 20 seconds it can deliver 70% of its original strength or performance. However, when the muscle fails and then is rested for 50 plus seconds, it can perform at 90% or more of its original strength or performance. This means when we shoot and shoot without adequate rest between shots we are limiting our ability to shoot to our true potential. Simply put we cannot hold our shot window to our possible potential.

The stronger we are the more ability we have to control our shot window and realize better performance. Now obviously the individual should not “over bow” themselves by trying to use more draw weight than we can comfortably handle. So if you are having problems with consistency in shots, maybe you would want to consistently take a few more seconds between shots. Imagine if you let your muscles recover just a few more seconds, you will hold a better (longer) shot window. It is about “better shots” not more shots!

This has been tested to show when consistency of muscle recovery is allowed, individuals shoot way more consistently. So if you want to be less frustrated shoot more consistently and enjoy your results more. Slow down and space your shot times! Oh, you may want to get stronger and then you will find the greater your strength, the easier it is to hold longer shot windows.

Implementation:

1) When shooting, take the first shot, then wait 20 to 50-plus seconds for your next shot. This will allow more muscle recovery for a stronger, more stable second shot. (The more close to 50 seconds you can wait the better the recovery.)

2) When competing take the first shot as soon as possible, then allow as much time as is available between the next shots to again allow more stability for accuracy.

3) You may want to utilize a small watch with a second hand for optimum use of this muscle recovery.

More repetitions are never better for practicing a specific skill. Better repetitions are preferable. When a heavier ball is used, or a weighted anything is used, you are recruiting muscles and nerves differently than are normally required. This will only serve to frustrate the athlete or individual. Never practice a skill when tired, as you will be recruiting muscles and nerves to utilize a pattern of recruitment that is inappropriate and inaccurate. Conditioning and strengthening are to be a totally different activity. Remember ego and intelligence are opposites, so use information to gain the edge.

I have over 40 years of work in the field of human performance and thousands of clients to attest to this. So be smart, be sure, use the body the way it is designed, as well as the bow and success will be yours.

http://www.resultsareproof.com


Immediately Increase Your Accuracy and Consistancy While Target Shooting


The Great Fitness Fraud

The Great Fitness Fraud

by Bert Seelman

How to Immediately Increase Accuracy with Repeatability!

Getting better accuracy in archery requires better implementation of certain basic skills. Being proficient at those skills requires certain physical abilities. For instance, the right strength in the right areas are essential. Strength and its proper use is something too often not adequately considered in many sports.

I met and have had the pleasure of working with Pete and Jon Shepley, owners of Precision Shooting Equipment, for over 30 years. They had employed me to help them with better conditioning for intense hunting conditions and health improvements. During this time I was also fortunate to be able to work with a lot of their Pro-staff, friends and other archers. One of the most standout observations I made was archers now and throughout history usually are and needed to be in good physical condition.

One of the first things I started to hear from most of the archers I met was about their ability to not just to shoot well, but to shoot well repeatedly. Repeatability of good shots was the goal whether it is for hunting, target, or even just for recreation.  Consistency it seemed was everything making the shot window (as it is called) the key area!

The time between when an archer draws their arrow and when it is released is called “the shot window.” The ability to hold the draw weight, be steady, concentrate and release without shaking or straining, is of major importance. Without this window being held without straining, shaking, quivering and then to not panic into release, is critical! If this is accomplished with ease and steady handedness the shot will be delivered with more concentration and consistency!

It is critical to position the body in the correct position while performing this task of drawing, holding, concentrating, and then releasing. The requirements are strength and knowledge. Of course we are considering the individual to already have good basic techniques. So let’s consider for now what is it that will give us the ability to repeat those good shots.

Anything that requires physical movement is made easier or more repeatable by strength! Even endurance depends on strength. When I say strength, it is important it should be considered only on an individual basis. To compare strength with two different individuals would serve no purpose as this would have too many genetic variables. So let’s do this in a way that would be as accurate as possible. We will use only one and the same person as an example.

Let us take an individual and test that person at two different levels of strength. The “not so obvious” is that the ability to do more repetitions would be when they are stronger. To show this let me give this clear example. Say our individual was capable of doing exactly timed repetitions at an exact distance for 20 reps with 300 pounds at their earlier level. Now let’s say at a later time we take this same individual when they are stronger and able to do these same distance and timed reps at a level of 20 reps for 600 pounds. Now let’s give this same individual only 150 pounds and tell them to do as many reps as possible to test their endurance. The individual will find they can do way more repetitions with the 150 pounds at the stronger or 600 pound level.

Why? Simple math shows the 150 pounds is only one fourth of the 600 pound level. However, the 150 pounds is actually one half of the lighter 300 pound level. Common sense and mathematical calculation show the higher your strength the less the weight is in proportion to the stronger level of ability. The ability to do more repetitions with a lesser resistance or weight is simply totally obvious. However, egos will always try to refute most everything..

Therefore, simple observation and self evident facts show us strength is endurance. However, only on an individual basis! When I am stronger I can do more reps than when I am not as strong. Not too difficult, huh?

Now let me state that strength has its limits also. However, by having this working knowledge, an archer or athlete can start to understand and work with these limitations to their advantage so they can excel far beyond their competition and enhance their own performance.

Now let’s start with the fact when a muscle is pushed or worked to a point of exhaustion or momentary failure, it recovers its ability in stages. When a muscle can no longer contract or pull at a level and then is rested for 3 seconds, it can deliver around 50% of its original strength or performance. When that same muscle is rested after momentary failure for 20 seconds it can deliver 70% of its original strength or performance. However, when the muscle fails and then is rested for 50 plus seconds, it can perform at 90% or more of its original strength or performance. This means when we shoot and shoot without adequate rest between shots we are limiting our ability to shoot to our true potential. Simply put we cannot hold our shot window to our possible potential.

The stronger we are the more ability we have to control our shot window and realize better performance. Now obviously the individual should not “over bow” themselves by trying to use more draw weight than we can comfortably handle. So if you are having problems with consistency in shots, maybe you would want to consistently take a few more seconds between shots. Imagine if you let your muscles recover just a few more seconds, you will hold a better (longer) shot window. It is about “better shots” not more shots!

This has been tested to show when consistency of muscle recovery is allowed, individuals shoot way more consistently. So if you want to be less frustrated shoot more consistently and enjoy your results more. Slow down and space your shot times! Oh, you may want to get stronger and then you will find the greater your strength, the easier it is to hold longer shot windows.

Implementation:

1) When shooting, take the first shot, then wait 20 to 50-plus seconds for your next shot. This will allow more muscle recovery for a stronger, more stable second shot. (The more close to 50 seconds you can wait the better the recovery.)

2) When competing take the first shot as soon as possible, then allow as much time as is available between the next shots to again allow more stability for accuracy.

3) You may want to utilize a small watch with a second hand for optimum use of this muscle recovery.

More repetitions are never better for practicing a specific skill. Better repetitions are preferable. When a heavier ball is used, or a weighted anything is used, you are recruiting muscles and nerves differently than are normally required. This will only serve to frustrate the athlete or individual. Never practice a skill when tired, as you will be recruiting muscles and nerves to utilize a pattern of recruitment that is inappropriate and inaccurate. Conditioning and strengthening are to be a totally different activity. Remember ego and intelligence are opposites, so use information to gain the edge.

I have over 40 years of work in the field of human performance and thousands of clients to attest to this. So be smart, be sure, use the body the way it is designed, as well as the bow and success will be yours.

http://www.resultsareproof.com


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