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PSE’s Will Jenkins is Finding the Time


By Will Jenkins
http://www.thewilltohunt.com/

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins’ Finding Time- Evening Hunt

With the rut kicking in and holidays on the horizon, we are all scrambling to find time to hunt. This is a challenge for all hunters especially those of us that have kids and busy work schedules. Unless you are blessed with a ridiculous amount of paid vacation or you hunt for a living you must put effort into finding time to hunt.

While an all-day sit during the rut is great if you’re able to sneak out of work an hour or two early and stop by one of your hunting spots with just a couple hours before shooting light ends, do it. While activity is up during the day the bucks are still moving at dusk. They’ll start running around checking doe bedding areas. If you don’t have time to pack in a stand or climb a tree bring a stool or find a stump and just sit on the ground. While tree stands have their advantages when you’re in a hurry. They can be loud and slow you down.

Similarly, if you can get into work a little later you can get some good action right at day break. With day light savings time now, it’s a little harder to get in before it gets dark after woks so sneaking in, in the morning might be the ticket.

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins Hunting Sunset

For those of you with a spouse and kids, make it a family event. Give your spouse a break and take your kids with you hunting. Even if you don’t make a kill or even see anything you’re still out there introducing your kids to hunting and at the same time hopefully earning some brownie points for giving your spouse a little break.

I killed my first deer a small buck on a quick late morning hunt. It was a Saturday and Dad and I were slow getting up so we didn’t even get into the woods until after 9AM. Within an hour I spotted the buck and about 20 minutes later he was dead. So, I guess the lesson here is, find the time to get out even if it’s only a couple of hours and make it happen! Like so many always say, you can’t kill them from the couch!

Will Jenkins is creator of TheWilltoHunt.com and Harnesses For Hunters. He’s an avid outdoorsman who enjoys sharing his experiences through his blog. He also writes for Bow Adventures e-Magazine and is a member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association.

Will lives in Central Virginia with his wife and two kids. He hunts in Virginia and Maryland but has dreams of heading west to hunt Elk and Mule Deer.
 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’S Albert Quackenbush Teaching Our Children


By Albert Quackenbush
www.SoCalBowhunter.com

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush givng his daughter a lesson in proper hand placement

When my dad taught me how to shoot a bow I felt like I was on top of the world. I was able to take part in something I knew he loved and I got to learn from him. From shooting at straw bales in the backyard to hunting whitetails on the farm, you could almost always find us with a bow in our hands. He was an excellent teacher and to this day is very encouraging when it comes to bow hunting. Now I am in that role of being a father. As parents, my wife and I have the responsibility of guiding our daughter and molding her into the woman she’ll become. We can teach her things together as parents, and we can also share our own individual gifts with her. It goes without saying that what I share most with her, on an individual level, is bow hunting. Just as I won’t hide from anyone who asks me about hunting, I will not hide what I do and love from her. By sharing my side of life she will learn about her dad, but also learn more about herself as she grows.

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Showing his daughter a good example of how to shoot

As my dad taught me the ways of the bow, I have begun teaching my daughter, Riley. It’s not only the archery that I share with her though. When I turn on an outdoor television show about bow hunting, I take note of what’s happening and also what my daughter is doing. Explaining what is happening during the shows is easy. She follows right along, but the hard part is making sure she understands it. When an animal is shot with an arrow, I don’t cover her eyes and I don’t tell her they ‘caught’ the animal as I have heard other parents do. This father is sure to tell his daughter that the animal was shot and killed. It died. Stopping there would make no sense and I explain that the person is going to eat the animal or share it with someone else who will eat it. She may not understand it all now, but as time progresses it will all begin to make sense.

On almost any Saturday (hunting season excluded) the early hours usually have a typical storyline. I wake up and make some coffee. Riley wakes up shortly thereafter and we get a few hours to do what we’d like. Her eyes light up when I ask her if she’d like to head down to our garage to play. The great thing about my relationship with my daughter is that even at 3 1/2 she knows that if we are heading out to the garage she can always shoot her bow. For the past couple months, when we get down there she nearly always ask if she can shoot her bow and arrows. As a bow hunter and father, this makes me a very proud papa! Every time she asks my answer is a resounding YES! The bow she is using is just a little shooter with suction cup tipped arrows and I am trying to instill safety in her, so we always shoot outside the house. She doesn’t seem to mind if we are shooting at a piece of cardboard, she just enjoys it! The first few times she wanted my help, but anyone with kids knows they want to do it themselves very quickly.

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Daughter Riley wanting to do it herself, nocks another arrow

The thrill I get when Riley walks around the house and mimics shooting a bow is undeniable. She will pretend to draw her bow and tell me she is shooting an elk. (I guess I have been talking a lot about elk hunting lately.) She even asks me about my trips to the archery range, shooting with my friends and if I had fun doing it. Now THAT will make any bow hunting dad proud. It makes my day when I hear her ask me things like that. She listens intently and hopefully will keep a few tips from dear-old dad tucked away for future use.

I want to encourage all of you bow hunters who are also parents to share the details of hunting with your kids. Don’t shelter them and hide the truth of what happens when we hunt. If you are honest with them, they will appreciate what bow hunting is more than you’ll ever know. The phrase has been repeated over and over, but I feel it speaks the truth – bowhunting is my passion. I am not expecting Riley to have that same passion. The only thing I can expect is for her to choose her passion for herself. Whatever she chooses to be her passion, you can bet that her mother and I will support her in every way we can.

Albert Quackenbush has been bowhunting for more than 28 years. He shares his adventures on his blog, www.SoCalBowhunter.com, and also writes for Bow Adventures e-magazine. He is a Pro Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com, Piranha Custom Bowstrings and Field Logic. He is a member of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, California Deer Association, and is a Life Member of the North American Hunting Club.

Albert was born and raised in New York State where he learned to hunt everything from squirrels to whitetail deer. He currently resides in Southern California with his wife and daughter and hunts year round.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Albert Quackenbush – Proud Bow Hunter


By Albert Quackenbush
SoCalBowhunter.com

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Target Practice

Hunting has been in my family for as long as I remember. My dad and brother are the two best hunting partners a guy could ask for. We would spend all year discussing the previous year, the weather, where to place stands and when October would arrive so we could get in the woods. Sure, we hunted for small game and turkey, but the animal we most desired was the whitetail deer. I took it for granted, until I moved 3,000 miles away.

Where I grew up in New York State everyone hunted. When I moved to California that all changed. It was a new place with new friends who didn’t understand hunting. Then married a woman who doesn’t care for hunting, but she appreciates the passion I have for it. I am a proud bow hunter and I am not afraid to share it.

I have actually made some great new friends through bow hunting in California. Some of the guys are my new bow hunting partners. Every week we hit the archery range to practice and talk about the upcoming archery seasons and what we can hunt. I look forward to it each and every week.

Now that my daughter is three and a half, I have started sharing more and more of the outdoors with her. I have never hidden the fact that I hunt, nor will I be ashamed of it. Sometimes, when I am watching a hunting show on television, she’ll hop on my lap and point out the animals onscreen. It makes me proud to know she knows the animals and sees the hunters in pursuit of wild game.

When I get home wearing camouflage face paint, she often jokingly asks me if I am wearing makeup. Of course I reply that indeed I am!

Al Quackenbush

PSE’s Al Quackenbush Teaching his Daughter to Shoot

Just recently, my daughter and I ventured to a sporting goods retailer and we picked out her very first bow. While I was introduced to archery when I was nine, I figured she could start earlier if she wanted to. Sure, she’s not going want to focus on it for more than five minutes, but she should have fun and shoot some arrows like her dad if she wants to. Enthusiastically, she said that she wanted the bow and also loved seeing all of the taxidermy around.

The next day, we got her bow out of the package and she shot for the first time. Like most kids, she was frustrated at first. With a little patience and coaxing, she was shooting arrows and smiling in no time. You can bet that I will be sharing more bow hunting tips and techniques as we both age gracefully.

Albert Quackenbush has been bowhunting for more than 28 years. He shares his adventures on his blog, SoCalBowhunter.com, and also writes for Bow Adventures e-magazine. He is a Pro Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com, Piranha Custom Bowstrings and Field Logic. He is a member of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, California Deer Association, and is a Life Member of the North American Hunting Club.

Albert was born and raised in New York State where he learned to hunt everything from squirrels to whitetail deer. He currently resides in Southern California with his wife and daughter and hunts year round.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Dustin Jones – An Unforgettable Moment


By Dustin Jones
HighCountryBowhunter.com

PSE  Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones & Son

Sharing my love for bowhunting is something that I truly enjoy. When my wife and I were dating, she didn’t know very much about hunting. In fact when she would come over and we would watch old hunting tapes or watch hunting shows, she couldn’t stand watching. I made sure not to force it on her but to share why I enjoy it so much. To show her how much fun it could be, I gave her a bow and we started shooting the 3-D range in the evenings whenever we could. Her comment to me was that she could shoot targets but not a real animal. This was perfectly fine with me. I get to take her out and practice and share my love for archery with my wife.

I get to share it even more now with my son. He just turned 3 and taking him to archery shoots to teach him just as my dad did is an experience that I will never forget. I got him his first bow not too long ago and seeing his face light up and how excited he got is an unforgettable moment. I knew the excitement he felt and I know now how my dad felt.

Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones’ Son

I got to take my son to a 3-D archery shoot and start teaching him how to shoot his bow. This was truly a memorable experience. He loved to see all the animal targets and of course he had to carry his “noculars” (binoculars) just like his dad. We pretended we were hunting and had to look for the animal and then sneak up to make the shot. His first archery experience was a success! Spending that time passing on what I have learned from my dad onto my son was a moment I’ll never forget.

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.

Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE Introduces the PSE Staff Bloggers


PSE Staff Bloggers

PSE Staff Bloggers

September 10, 2012 Tucson, AZ – Precision Shooting Equipment, Inc. (PSE), a pioneering company in the archery industry, announces the selection of the PSE Staff Bloggers for blog.pse-archery.com.

“We are very honored to have assembled such an outstanding team of bloggers to represent PSE,” said Blake Shelby, PSE Director of Marketing. “Their dedication to DIY hunting, family and bowhunting will be represented in their posts.”

The PSE Staff Blogger Team consists of the following:

“We are excited to welcome them to the PSE family and look forward to reading their posts,” said Jonathan Shepley, President of PSE. “We believe they will be an asset to our industry with their tips, strategies and insights into bowhunting and archery.”

About Precision Shooting Equipment, Inc.

Pete Shepley, a legend in the archery industry, founded PSE 41 years ago. Today, PSE is one of the largest privately-owned archery equipment manufacturing companies in the country and a leader in development and manufacturing of the most advanced compound bows and related equipment ever produced.

For more information about PSE, visit www.pse-archery.com  or read their blog at http://blog.pse-archery.com.


Curtis Goettsch’s First Bow Buck with PSE


Curtis G.

PSE’s Curtis Goettsch

Editor’s Note: Curtis Goettsch of Elkader, Iowa, has several reasons for loving PSE Bows.

I was hunting on public hunting land at a spot I’d found early in the season, when I’d been fall turkey hunting. I had seen a lot of deer in this area, and I thought it might be a good place to try and take a buck. A couple of trails came through this area, with a rub line and scraping activity going on in this spot. Also, this was an ideal funnel region, because on one side was a sheer cliff and on the other side was a creek. So, the deer had to come through this little narrow gap to move from one section of the woods to the other. I didn’t take a stand in the pinch point, but instead set up a little back from the funnel.

The buck came in about 4:50 pm in the afternoon. I saw the height of the antlers and how big they were, but I didn’t take the time to count the points, since earlier in the hunt I’d seen some nice 8-point bucks that were too far away to shoot. I just assumed that this buck was one of those 8-pointers. The buck was chasing a doe. As soon as I saw antlers, I knew that this buck was a shooter. I watched the doe to see which way she was going, knowing that the buck would be right behind her. I could tell that she was probably going to come right under my tree stand, and I was going to have a really close shot with my PSE Polaris Express.

PSE's Curtis Goettsch

White Tail Buck

Now, I had a new problem. I had to determine how to get my bow drawn without the doe’s seeing me, so that I could prepare for a shot at the buck. I wasn’t worried about the buck’s spotting me, since he was intensely focused on the doe. As soon as the doe was directly under me, I drew my bow. The doe stopped when she heard my arm rubbing against my side as I made the draw. When she stopped, the buck stopped. Even though I was at full draw, I hadn’t moved the bow into position to aim. The buck started looking around to see why the doe had stopped. He was broadside to me, but quartering to me just a little. I used my bottom pin to sight-in on the buck, since he was only 25 steps to the base of my tree.

When I shot the buck, he whirled around and went back the direction he’d come from, and then I heard him crash. Since this buck was my first one, I didn’t want to pressure him. I decided to go back to the truck and call my buddy to help me find the deer and drag it out. I told my buddy, “I think I shot a pretty good 8-pointer, and I need you to help me get him out.” My buddy showed up about an hour after I called him, and we followed the blood trail. The buck hadn’t gone very far. When we saw the buck, my buddy went running up to the deer, grabbed the antlers and looked at the deer. He said, “That’s better than an 8-pointer, it’s a 10.” We both got pretty pumped up that the buck was so big. That’s still the biggest buck I’ve ever taken. So, I had taken my first deer, the doe, and the biggest buck I ever had taken with my PSE Polaris Express, all in the same season. I decided that when I had a bow that performed that well, I didn’t need another bow. The Polaris Express had done everything that I had asked it to do and more.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Why Curtis Goettsch Came Back To PSE


Curtis G

PSE’S Curtis Goettsch

Editor’s Note: Curtis Goettsch of Elkader, Iowa, has several reasons for loving PSE.

By 2006, I had evolved as a bowhunter and had started shooting tournament archery. I changed bows, because another manufacturer was producing a bow that I hoped would not only be a better bow to hunt with but also be better for tournaments. I was shooting in the Bowhunter Class and had become a Mossy Oak Pro. During that time, Mossy Oak and PSE had partnered on several different projects, and I was ready to change bows again. I didn’t really care which bow I shot, as long as the bow could help me be a better bowhunter and a better tournament archer. So, I tested a lot of different bows that were on the market in 2011.

The dealer at the archery shop where I worked had a PSE Dream Season EVO and asked me to try it. I really didn’t like duo-cam bows, since they all had a hard break-over when you hit the let-off point in the draw. However, the EVO had a smooth draw, almost like a single-cam bow. I really couldn’t believe how smooth the draw was. I was also excited about moving up to a faster power performance bow, so the speed and the smooth draw of the PSE Dream Season EVO really got my attention. I was shooting a lot of 3D archery at that time, and I felt that to be competitive, I needed a faster and a better performing bow.

PSE's Curtis Goettsch Bows

Precision Shooting Archery – Compound Bows

I had talked to a lot of people in the bowhunting industry. I also talked to the guy who owned the bow shop, who had shot the PSE Dream Season EVO all winter long and had decided that it was the best bow PSE ever had made. So, with that kind of recommendation, and having shot the bow, I made the decision to go with the PSE Dream Season EVO. During the summer of 2011, I shot my PSE Dream Season EVO in the Bowhunter Class at 3D-archery tournaments before the hunting season arrived. I really feel that’s one of the best ways to break in a new bow – participating in 3-D archery tournaments – so when bow season comes in, you and your new bow are the best you possibly can be. I won my first 3D-archery tournament with the PSE Dream Season EVO. That was really exciting for me, because I never dreamed I could shoot well enough to win a tournament. At the tournament I won, there were 186 archers in the bowhunter class. When I won that tournament, I was feeling really good about my decision to shoot PSE, and I was really excited about the performance of my PSE Dream Season EVO.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Traditional Archery – Following In My Father’s Footsteps


Alden Kizer

Alden Kizer

I have been shooting a compound since I was nine years old. My Dad has only shot Traditional bows his whole life and I want to follow in his footsteps.  A good friend of my father’s got me a Ghost recurve which I am going to practice with as much as possible to harvest a deer! I want to make hunting as challenging and enjoyable as possible!

Alden Kizer


PSE’s Georgianna Braden Explains Why Ladies Should Consider Archery and Bowhunting


Target Archery

PSE’S Georgianna Braden

Editor’s Note: Georgianna Braden of Houston, Texas, is a petite, pixie like lady. If you saw her on the street or in the courtroom, you’d never consider her as one of the top female archers. She is not only a tournament archer, but also an avid bowhunter and an advocate for women’s archery. Georgianna, who’s been shooting a bow for 7 years, and her husband Michael are both members of the PSE Pro Staff.

Georgianna, why would you encourage other women to pick up bows, learn to shoot them, compete in tournaments and possibly become bowhunters?
Braden: There are a couple of reasons. Archery is a sport that helps build self-discipline. Archery also helps to relieve stress and to develop a calm spirit. When you go out and practice, you can focus on yourself and improving yourself. It also allows you to compete with yourself and see where you can make improvements. Archery is an avenue that allows you to have healthy competition with other people, meet new people, excel and become a better competitor. You many not be athletically talented, super strong or ever have seen yourself as an athlete, but archery provides the vehicle to attain these and many more skills, regardless of your strength and athletic ability. Archery also enables you to become friends with other people who have similar interests. You can really connect with them through this type of sport.

What percentage of archery are skills based, and what percentage is social based?
Braden: I believe that archery is 90% social and only 10% skill based. Sure, you have to develop your skills as an archer to improve competitively and to be an efficient bowhunter. But, when you look at the amount of time we all spend at archery tournaments and when we go bowhunting, the largest percentage of time is spent talking and visiting with our friends, and that is what I love about the sport. I love making friends with people at competitions. At an archery competition, you shoot with other archers in a group, and you move station to station with that group. Only when you are at the line are you participating in the shoot. The rest of the time you’re getting to know people in your group, and we talk on and off the field of competition. Each of the groups that I have shot with has been tremendously supportive, and they are also a lot of fun.

Target Shooters

PSE’S Georgianna Braden

Georgianna, why would you encourage mothers to get their children and husbands into archery?
Braden: Archery provides a chance to spend time with your children and your husband away from cell phones, TV, video games and all the other distractions that keep families from interacting together. Your family can see that their mother enjoys archery and has a passion for it. Everyone in the family can participate in the sport of archery. Archery is a healthy way to introduce youngsters to competitive sports. In archery, they can learn that to get better at a sport, they don’t have to beat someone else. They have to constantly improve themselves. At our local archery club, we have several single moms who bring their children, have them involved in archery and shoot as a family and practice together. Shooting archery is a way not only for single moms to connect with their children, but also moms in a more traditional family. Everyone in the family can participate in a sport that’s fun. It gives the family a way to connect with each other and share an interest together. When a mom is helping a child learn to shoot archery, there is a trust bond that develops to help the child to trust the mom more and also helps the mom to trust the child. Both the youngster and the mom want to spend more time together, when they’re participating in a fun activity like archery. If there is anything I can do to encourage more women to get involved in archery. I’ll do it in a heartbeat. I also encourage them to get into bowhunting. I believe bowhunting gives a lady a lot of self-esteem, because it may have been a sport she’s thought she can’t do. However, the main reason I encourage women to embrace the sport of archery is that it’s just a lot of fun.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Georgianna Braden Explains How to Choose the Right Bow to Shoot


PSE'S Archer Georgianna Braden

PSE’S Georgianna Braden

Editor’s Note: Georgianna Braden of Houston, Texas, is a petite, pixie like lady. If you saw her on the street or in the courtroom, you’d never consider her as one of the top female archers. She is not only a tournament archer, but also an avid bowhunter and an advocate for women’s archery. Georgianna, who’s been shooting a bow for 7 years, and her husband Michael are both members of the PSE Pro Staff.

Georgianna Braden’s bow of choice is the PSE Bow Madness. “This bow is very stable, forgiving, and fast,” Braden explains. “This is my competition bow. Many archers choose the Bow Madness as their hunting bow, but I like the Bow Madness for shooting competition archery. I like its axle-to-axle length. Because of the shape of the riser, if my form isn’t perfect every time, the bow is forgiving enough that you don’t see a huge variation of the impact of the arrow when I shoot. I shoot 52 pounds, but the first bow I ever purchased was 27 pounds. As my muscles have become stronger, I’ve been able to increase the weight of the bow I’m pulling by 1 to 2 pounds, and within a couple of months, I was shooting 35 pounds comfortably.

PSE Georgianna

Georgianna Braden Shooting PSE

“After a year in competition, I knew that I wanted to try out hunting. So, I wanted to get my strength up to the point that I could pull a bow heavy enough to hunt with, which was 40 pounds, to legally hunt in the State of Texas. Often ladies think that shooting archery is like bodybuilding, and they say, ‘I don’t want to build up muscles, so that I’ll look like a bodybuilder,’ but with archery, this concern is not even an issue. I feel physically stronger when I shoot archery, but I don’t feel muscular. Archery just helps improve a lady’s upper body strength. I do feel sleeker. I feel like my arms aren’t so weak, and they’re not flabby.”

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


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