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PSE Bows = Success in the 2012 IBO National Triple Crown Overall!


BOHNING X-FORCE X-PRESS

Bohning X-Force X-Press Team – Bill Epeards, Joe Burns, Rich Corsi and Larry Van

Congratulations to the Bohning X-Force X-Press Team for winning the 2012 IBO National Triple Crown Overall event in the Senior Hunter Class Division! This is their fourth time winning the event! The total score was 3643. The Bohning X-Force X-Press Team is Bill Epeards, Joe Burns, Rich Corsi and Larry Van. The whole team shoots PSE bows. Frank Burns – PSE Omen Pro, Rich Corsi – PSE Bow Madness XL and both Larry Van and Bill Epeards shoot the PSE X-Force Dream Season EVO.

BOHNING X-FORCE X-PRESS

Bohning X-Force X-Press Team – Bill Epeards, Joe Burns, Rich Corsi and Larry Van

The Bohning X-Force X-Press Team also won all three legs of the Triple Crown in the Senior Hunter Class. Way to go guys!!


PSE’S Michael Braden Loves His PSE Bows


PSE Archery Compound Bow

PSE’S Michael Braden

Editor’s Note: Michael Braden of Houston, Texas, started shooting with PSE in the early 1990s, turned pro, shooting a PSE bow, in 1996, and won the ASA Rookie of the Year. Then in 2009, he came back to be a part of the PSE Pro Staff and has been shooting for PSE ever since, besides coaching shooters.

Michael, what is it that you like about PSE bows?
Braden: PSE always has had really good bows in every area of competitive archery and bow hunting. This quality of PSE bows is important to me, because I shoot both 3D archery and spots, and I also bow hunt. So, my participation in archery covers just about the entire spectrum of the sport. I try to shoot just about every kind of archery that I can shoot.

PSE Archery

PSE Dominator Compound Bow

Okay, let’s look at your bows of choice, and why you choose them.
Braden: For shooting indoors, I shoot the Dominator Pro with the Mini Evo Cams. I’ve really grown to like the ME Cams, because I like a really hard wall. With this cam, you have the ability to create that wall. And, I’ve always been a fan of two cams. The ME, because it’s a hybrid, is little more like the two cams, so I’ve really grown to like that cam. This bow is the one I’ve primarily been shooting spots with, but I’ve also been shooting the Dominator 3D. This bow is somewhat shorter axle to axle and somewhat faster than the Dominator Pro, and it allows me to test different arrow weights, sizes and poundage. I’ve really grown to like the Dominator 3D with its stiff riser and bridge support, so that I don’t have a lot of lateral torque on the bow. Their shorter axle-to-axle and shorter brace heights are elements that generate some really good speeds to help me be more competitive in the 3D arena. For me, the PSE Dominator 3D bow will be set up for IBO, which allows 5 grains of arrow weight for every pound you pull. The IBO rules also take into consideration draw length. The more draw length you have, the faster the bow will shoot. The Dominator 3D, with a 29 1/2 inch draw, delivers 314 feet per second for me, IBO. When we shoot ASA, there’s a speed limit of 280 feet per second, so I may shoot a bigger, heavier arrow when I’m competing in IBO. I choose to change arrow weights rather than change bows, to shoot two different tournament circuits.

Which hunting bow are you shooting, and why?
Braden: That’s a tough question. I’ve got several hunting bows that I really like, and I’m not sure which one I like the best. I have the PSE EVO, and I’m also shooting a custom bow, which is a Supra with short limbs and the EVO cams. It’s similar to the PSE Freak, because it has a Supra handle with the big EVO cams. So, I’m basically shooting the PSE Freak with short limbs, and I really like that bow. This is one very important reason I shoot PSE that everyone may not know. PSE has a custom shop, so you have the ability to take component parts from different bows and find that magical configuration that you like. The reason I like the PSE Freak with short limbs is because I come from a target background, and I like a more stable, more forgiving bow for my hunting. This bow is a little bit longer axle-to-axle than most of the hunting bows on the market today.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Team PSE’s Mike Miller takes the Arizona Triple Crown Championship in the Open Masters Division


PSE's Mike Miller

PSE’s Mike Miller

I have been involved with archery for many years, I have competed in several styles and in several age groups. Now that I am in the Masters Division shooting with individuals that have all been past champions, it is critical to have an accurate, versatile and forgiving bow.

I had my eye on PSE a couple of years ago and even though I was very happy with what I was shooting at the time, it was apparent to me that PSE‘s engineers had really met the design needs of today’s competitive archers and hunters. I could not be more satisfied with the equipment that PSE produces. They are fast, accurate, forgiving, quiet, no hand shock, and good looking too.

I own an Omen Pro, Supra ME, and a Bow Madness XL. All are quality products that can be shot with confidence if you are hunting, competing or just having fun at the range.

Mike Miller

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Master Coach Alexander Kirillov Sends More Archers to the 2012 Olympic Games!


Elias Malave and PSE's Master Coach Alexander Kirillov

Elias Malave and PSE’s Master Coach Alexander Kirillov

Elias Malave takes the gold with his PSE X-Appeal at the Archery World Cup in Odgen, Utah. This qualified him to go to the 2012 Olympic Games in London. His trainer is PSE’s Master Coach Alexander Kirillov.

Olga Bosch and PSE's Master Coach Alexander Kirillov

Olga Bosch and PSE’s Master Coach Alexander Kirillov

Olga Bosch from Venezuela won gold at the Pan American Championship in the FITA round with her PSE Dominator.

Elias Malave and Jeff Anderson

Elias Malave and Jeff Anderson

At the Pan American Championship in El Salvador, two PSE bows won gold and silver! Elias Malave from Venezuela won gold and Jeff Anderson from the United States won silver!

Ana Mendoza and PSE's Master Coach Alexander Kirillov

Ana Mendoza and PSE’s Master Coach Alexander Kirillov

Ana Mendoza from Venezuela won gold in the elimination round at the Pan American Championship in El Salvador with her PSE Supra!

Congrats to all the archers on their medals and to PSE’s Master Coach Alexander Kirillov on their successes!


PSE’s Christopher Perkins Gives Tips to Make You a More Productive bowhunter


Christopher Perkins - Target Archery Champion

Christopher Perkins – Target Archery Champion

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks of 2012, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. But, Perkins never really set out to be a tournament archer winning championships and money and gaining sponsors. Like many tournament pros, Perkins just wanted to shoot better, so he could become a more proficient bowhunter. However, Perkin’s love of bowhunting and the desire to become a better bowhunter lead him to participate in archery competitions and world championships. He discovered like many of us have that the marriage between target archery and bowhunting produces a much better target archer and bowhunter than just choosing one of these two archery sports.

Question: What is your opinion on using deer scents and deer lures for bowhunting?

I didn’t use deer scents and lures until last year when two of my buddies and I went to Illinois for a deer hunt. Up here in Canada, I primarily hunt funnels and pinch points where a large block of woods is necked down going to a feeding site. But, I found when deer are cruising in open woods that lures can be effective.

Question: Chris, give us five tips that will make anyone a better bowhunter.

* Participate in target archery to become a better bowhunter. Target archery teaches you not to just aim at the deer and not to just aim at the vital area but to aim at the center of the vital area or the spot you want to hit. In target archery, you learn to narrow your focus to a very small spot that you want to hit, which causes you to shoot more accurately at least that’s what happened to me. Learning that principle of target archery drastically has increased my accuracy as a bowhunter.  Target archery also has made me set up my hunting bow to be just as accurate as my target bow. To make a good shot as a professional archer, I need to be able to shoot and have the arrow hit in the center of a 2  or a 3 inch dot from 50 yards and at every distance for 50 yards to 5 yards. By learning to shoot that accurately, I am much more confident, I shoot better in the woods, and I spend less time trailing deer.

* Practice. Once again even if you don’t get to the point where you can shoot the center of a 2 inch dot at 50 yards, practice shooting archery in the off season to make you a better bowhunter than if you don’t practice.

* Keep your bow tuned up all year long. One of the big mistakes I see when hunters are shooting before the season, and for instance, they know that their strings have some wear on them, they’ll often think, “I can probably get one more season out of this string.” If you think that you can get one more season out of your bowstring, then the day you think that, go, and get a new string. Start shooting that string to get ready for bow season. Maybe you don’t think your sight or your rest or another piece of equipment bad enough or worn enough to justify replacing it. When you think that thought, that’s your brain telling you to replace that piece of equipment now. You never know when that trophy animal of a lifetime will be standing in front of you within bow range. When that opportunity comes along, you want to have the best equipment you can afford to do the best job it can possibly do.

* Make a friend of the people at your local bow shop. When you buy new equipment or new accessories, get them to set up your bow to make sure everything’s put on properly. Bow maintenance year round and practice shooting year round are the most critical elements in becoming a successful bowhunter. Developing your deer hunting skills is a given. You have to do that whether you bowhunt or gun hunt. What we are talking about is specifically being a better bowhunter.

* Develop patience   probably one of the most difficult skills. Remember that bowhunting is a game of waiting. Waiting also includes waiting for the animal to get within the distance that you feel confident that you can make an effective shot. For instance here in Canada where I hunt, I feel that I can make an effective shot at 50 yards IF there’s no wind, and the deer is calm and relaxed and either feeding or looking away from me. I can shoot accurately at distances greater than 50 yards. But in the places where I hunt and under the conditions that I hunt in, I choose not to take a shot of more than 50 yards. If the deer doesn’t come into that range, I don’t shoot  even though there’s a good chance that I can take the deer. You must have patience to wait long enough in the woods sitting in your tree stand or ground blind to finally see a deer and then to wait for that deer to get within the range for you to take a shot.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Dress for Success with PSE’s Christopher Perkins


Christopher Perkins - Target Archery Champion

Christopher Perkins – Target Archery Champion

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks of 2012, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. But, Perkins never really set out to be a tournament archer winning championships and money and gaining sponsors. Like many tournament pros, Perkins just wanted to shoot better, so he could become a more proficient bowhunter. However, Perkin’s love of bowhunting and the desire to become a better bowhunter lead him to participate in archery competitions and world championships. He discovered like many of us have that the marriage between target archery and bowhunting produces a much better target archer and bowhunter than just choosing one of these two archery sports.

Question: Christopher, what are the differences in shooting target archery and bowhunting as to the clothes you wear when in many target archery contests, you wear shorts and a tee shirt, but when you’re hunting at -27 degrees F at the end of a rut in Canada, and you have to sit in the cold for 6 hours to take a buck and must dress differently?

Since I live in Canada, I’m more accustomed to this type of weather than someone from Alabama maybe. The real secret to being able to shoot well in cold weather is to dress in layers and practice shooting the bow with all the clothes on that you’ll need to wear to hunt in cold weather. Or, that’s how I do it here in Canada. Another secret is not to bulk up too much. We have such good quality new high tech clothing that you really don’t have to get bulked up to stay warm and shoot accurately in extremely cold weather. I think your base layer (underwear) is the most important part of your cold weather clothing. I start off with tight layers of Under Armour underwear that fits very tight to my skin. That small zone between your skin and your clothing is where moisture first builds up. Moisture on your skin is a major factor in being cold. One misconception that some hunters have about constrictive type of underwear is that it can inhibit the shot. However, this Under Armour is the same type of underwear that many professional football players wear when they’re playing in extremely cold weather. And, they have to be far more mobile than a bowhunter does. So, I wear that type of base layer to keep moisture away from my skin and keep me warmer. Then I wear a little heavier layer on top of that to add an insulating layer that also helps to keep me warm. On top of that, I put my outer layer, which is usually windproof and waterproof bib coveralls and a heavier jacket.

Question: One of the big advantages that we have now that archers haven’t had in the past is that much of the hunting clothing we’re wearing today is being designed and engineered with more wicking and insulation properties, wind blocking and waterproofing than ever before. The hunting garment industry has become very aware of creating layering systems that are lightweight, very flexible and extremely warm. One of the big advantages that the bowhunter of today has is that much of today’s outdoor clothing is being designed for and created by garment makers who are bowhunters. Therefore, in today’s marketplace if you do a little bit of research and study, you can find lighter weight clothing that’s extremely warm that makes bowhunting in extreme temperatures much better and easier without having to put on clothes that are too bulky.

I don’t want to layer up with so much clothing that I can’t get off an accurate shot. One of the garments that I wear that I’ve found is extremely useful in cold weather is a bowhunter’s vest is made by Primos that allows me to keep everything packed in and tight on my chest and helps to keep my clothing away from my bowstring.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Christopher Perkins Gives Tips to Make You a More Productive bowhunter


PSE’s Christopher Perkins Says to Marry Tournament Archery to Bowhunting to Improve at Both Sports


Christopher Perkins - Target Archery Champion

Christopher Perkins – Target Archery Champion

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks of 2012, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. But, Perkins never really set out to be a tournament archer winning championships and money and gaining sponsors. Like many tournament pros, Perkins just wanted to shoot better, so he could become a more proficient bowhunter. However, Perkin’s love of bowhunting and the desire to become a better bowhunter lead him to participate in archery competitions and world championships. He discovered like many of us have that the marriage between target archery and bowhunting produces a much better target archer and bowhunter than just choosing one of these two archery sports.

Question: Tell us about some other deer you’ve taken with your PSE bow.

I took another buck in 2008 the same year I took my first buck. I took this 9 point buck in October. I never got a trail camera picture of this buck. He just showed up on the property. I had a box full of trail camera pictures of other bucks, but I didn’t have a single picture of this buck that weighed 180 pounds dressed. He was a small basket rack buck that came to within 20 yards, and I took the shot. He went only about 30 yards before he piled up

Christopher Perkins, like many other bowhunters who also shoot tournament archery, knows that one of the biggest advantages of shooting tournament archery during the off season is that you drastically can reduce the amount of time required to trail and find your deer when bowhunting, because you’ll shoot accurately. When you’re able to place the arrow exactly where it needs to go and either get a double lung shot or a heart shot, then most of the time you’ll only have to travel a short distance from where you’ve arrowed the buck to where you find him. Another factor that plays a major role in recovering your animals is the size of the entry hole and the size of the exit wound. The bigger the hole, the better the blood trail. The speed at which the arrow is traveling when it makes impact also helps ensure that you get a clean pass through   just one of the many reasons why people enjoy hunting with PSE bows, since PSE produces some of the fastest bows in the archery industry. In the past, the weight of the bow determined speed. Many years ago archers had to shoot heavy bows to get fast speeds. However, because of the cam systems and the intensive engineering designed in the PSE bows we have today, you can get that good speed with a lighter weight bow. Too, because of the let off system on today’s bows, you don’t have to hold that heavy poundage so long, while waiting for a buck to step out to the spot where you can take the shot. All of us who go afield to take game with our bows want to know that when we draw our bows back and put our sights on the spots we want the arrows to enter the animals that when we release these arrows, they it will fly true to the targets.

One of the best ways to shoot with confidence during hunting season is to build that confidence by shooting target archery in the off season. You not only learn the mechanical and physical skills required to make an accurate shot when an animal presents itself by shooting target archery, but just as importantly, you learn to control your emotions and be able to shoot accurately under pressure. When you’re in the woods, no one is watching when you make the shot. However, a buck of a lifetime standing in front of you impacts your shot with a tremendous amount of pressure, anxiety and adrenaline. When you are shooting target archery, everyone is watching the flight (other competitors you are shooting against) and the final rounds where observers also may include the press and possibly TV crews. In that situation, you have to face and overcome the same mental and emotional problems that you must face and overcome when you have the big game animal of a lifetime standing in front of you. So, shooting target archery in the off season not only will better prepare you mechanically to take game during the hunting season, but it will also better prepare you emotionally for the moment of truth when the big game animal of your dreams presents the shot.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

Tomorrow: Dress for Success with PSE’s Christopher Perkins


PSE’s Christopher Perkins Tells about His Invisible Buck and How He Took Him


Christopher Perkins - Bowhunter

Christopher Perkins – Bowhunter

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks of 2012, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. But, Perkins never really set out to be a tournament archer winning championships and money and gaining sponsors. Like many tournament pros, Perkins just wanted to shoot better, so he could become a more proficient bowhunter. However, Perkin’s love of bowhunting and the desire to become a better bowhunter lead him to participate in archery competitions and world championships. He discovered like many of us have that the marriage between target archery and bowhunting produces a much better target archer and bowhunter than just choosing one of these two archery sports.

Question: Tell us about another deer you took.

I took a deer in 2010 on December 26 with which I had quite a history. I’d been after this older buck for about 3 years. Once I took him, we aged him at about 6 1/2 years old.

Question: Christopher, how did you find this deer?

In 2008, I found where he was holding. The second year I never had an encounter with him, but I had plenty of trail camera pictures of the buck. I knew he was still on the property and hadn’t been harvested by anyone else. I used Moultrie and Bushnell trail cameras on our 243 acre farm. Only two of us hunt the property. So, I loaded up with trail cameras to locate the bucks I wanted to take during hunting season. I think using trail cameras is important, because, since I didn’t have an encounter with this buck, I easily could have given up hunting him. I could have assumed that someone else had taken him, or that he had left the property, if I hadn’t had his pictures on my trail camera the second year I hunted him. This 8 point buck had 5 3/4 inch bases on his antlers and weighed 225 pounds field dressed. I believe that many times there may be big bucks on the properties we hunt that only move at night or just before daylight. Without using trail cameras, we’ll never see or know that we have a trophy buck on the lands we’re hunting. This particular buck was moving when I wasn’t on the property, or he was coming in to feed after I had left.

This buck was one of those really hard deer to hunt   probably the toughest deer I’d ever hunted. He was a very smart buck. He knew where to be when I was in the woods, and he understood where he could be when I left the woods. He would come to feed either late at night or early, early, early in the morning. Therefore I couldn’t go to my stand early in the morning, because I’d spook him off his feed. Then late in the evening, I’d stay in the stand until black dark, and after I left the stand, he would show up. This buck knew what was going on, and he had patterned me to know when and where I would be hunting him. That third year I caught up to him at the end of the rut in really, really cold weather. I sat in my stand for 6 hours on December 26, when the weather  was -27 degrees F. I’ve learned that deer will be on their feet when an area has a hard cold snap and looking for food close to their bedding region. To put the odds even more in my favor, I knew the time was the end of the rut in our section of the country, and he would be chasing does. When I spotted him, he was chasing does. Then I saw the buck coming in behind a doe he was so focused on that he wasn’t aware of anything else around him. When the doe stopped, he stopped, and I was already at full draw. Once he took the arrow, he only went 30 yards before he piled up. I took that buck with my PSE Vendetta bow   the same bow I’d taken the buck with earlier that year. This buck had come in to the same food source. I’m convinced that when you’re hunting older age class bucks you need to have as many elements in your favor as you possibly can. With this buck, the cold snap got the buck up and moving and looking for food, and the time was at the end of the rut, which meant he would be looking for those last does that were ready to breed before the rut ended.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Christopher Perkins Says to Marry Tournament Archery to bowhunting to Improve at Both Sports


PSE’s Christopher Perkins – Bowhunter Who Became a World Class Target Archer


Christopher Perkins - Bowhunter

Christopher Perkins – Bowhunter

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks of 2012, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. But, Perkins never really set out to be a tournament archer winning championships and money and gaining sponsors. Like many tournament pros, Perkins just wanted to shoot better, so he could become a more proficient bowhunter. However, Perkin’s love of bowhunting and the desire to become a better bowhunter lead him to participate in archery competitions and world championships. He discovered like many of us have that the marriage between target archery and bowhunting produces a much better target archer and bowhunter than just choosing one of these two archery sports.

Question: Christopher, when did you start bowhunting for deer?

I went on my first deer hunt when I was 12 years old. I had to be 12 to get a license, and in Canada, you had to take a test before the government would issue you your license. I’d been shooting the bow for a year before hunting season began. I started bowhunting with my dad as soon as I got a license. That first year, I took my first deer, and it was a doe. I shot her at 4 yards. She came across the field and walked right past me. I drew my bow and took the shot. After she took the arrow, she ran about 50 yards and piled up.

Question: What did you feel like when you took your first deer with your bow?

I had a huge adrenaline rush. It’s a feeling that’s hard to describe. I thought I could take a deer out to 20 or 30 yards, but I’d only been shooting for a year. I couldn’t believe that I’d gotten within 4 yards of that deer before turning my arrow loose. I guess that first deer is what really fueled the fires of my archery career. I knew that target archery, at least for me, was a necessity to be a good bowhunter. Since I’ve had my PSE Vendetta, I’ve taken three other bucks with it. The first buck I took with a PSE bow on October 4, 2010, was an 8 point and I took him with my PSE Omen. The buck was 16 or 17 yards away, when I released my arrow. He only went 10 yards before he tipped over. I shoot a Rage Two Blade Broadhead, a mechanical broadhead that makes a big entry hole and a big exit hole. When you hit a deer with this broadhead, you don’t have to do much tracking. I was hunting on the edge of a food plot at a pinch point, where the deer funneled into the food plot. This buck was the only deer I saw that day. If you’ll aim behind the deer’s shoulder at mid body, you’ll have a pretty good hit. But, I try and aim at the center of what I consider a 2 inch target on each deer. Target archery has taught me to not look at the entire target, even though it may be 2 inches in diameter. So, when I’m at full draw on a buck and have picked out the spot I want the arrow to hit, I try and aim in the center of that spot. I concentrate on exactly where I want the arrow to go and forget about the deer, and keep my total focus on the spot I want to hit. Whether I’m shooting target archery or bowhunting, I want to make the spot I’m aiming at as small as possible. Every time I put my pin on a specific spot, I want to make a shot of a lifetime. I want to shoot the best arrow I’ve ever shot. Again, this philosophy comes from target archery.

Question: What type of sight are you using?

I use a multi pin sight for bowhunting called the Axcel Armortech Pro. My pins are set from 20 to 60 yards. So, when this buck came in, I put my 20 yard pin just a little bit low on the spot I wanted to hit, and the arrow went right into the buck’s heart.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Christopher Perkins Tells about His Invisible Buck and How He Took Him


It’s London for the USA Women’s Archery Team!


USA Women Archery Team

USA Women’s Archery Team – (L to R) Khatuna Lorig, Jennifer Nichols, Miranda Leek

The USA Women’s Archery team won the last Olympic team qualification event yesterday in a tie breaker against Mexico resulting in a team spot in the 2012 London Olympics. PSE’s Jennifer Nichols and Miranda Leek will be joining Khatuna Lorig at the Games.  This will be Jennifer’s third Olympic team appearance and the first for Miranda. All three women are qualified to compete individually as well.

At the Archery World Cup in Ogden, Utah, Jennifer will be competing in the gold medal match that will be broadcast on www.watchESPN.com on Sunday afternoon, June 24th.  Jennifer, Miranda, and Khatuna will be shooting for the bronze medal in the team event as well.  By making it to the gold medal match in Ogden, Jennifer is now qualified to compete in the World Cup Finals in Tokyo in September.  This will be Jennifer’s first time competing in the World Cup Finals.

Congratulations Team USA!

 


What the Future Holds for PSE’s Christopher Perkins


PSE's Christopher Perkins

PSE’s Christopher Perkins

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. How did he do it, and what has he learned that can help you become a target archer and bowhunter? (Perkins enjoys both sports.)

Question: What’s in the future for you?

Perkins: I’ve got the World Championships next year in Germany. I won it last year, and I’ll go back to try to defend the title. That tournament pays right around $11,000 if you win it. I’ve got to go to Ogden, Utah, in a couple of weeks to shoot Stage Three for the World Cup.

Question: How long do you think you can stay this proficient in target archery?

Perkins: Hopefully a few years. I want to shoot as long as I can. I’m certainly not going to be giving it up in the next little bit. I want to try to perfect my shooting skills. I’m not perfect, that’s for sure. I think I’ve got a long way to go, and I’m going to continue to try to get better.

Question: What do you think would be required for you to become a perfect archer?

Perkins: There’s a lot more tournaments that I need to win. I’m not the best archer I can be yet, and I know that, and it’s going to take some years and some experience for me to continue to get better.

Question: When will you decide that you’re the best archer you can be?

Perkins: I know I’ve got some years ahead of me in shooting. I know I’ve got to compete in more international events and more big tournaments, and I know that I’ve got to win more than what I’ve won in the past.

Question: How will you know when you’ve become a perfect archer?

Perkins: I don’t think archery is a sport that you can be perfect at, although you strive for perfection every time you shoot. You can be a good archer, but you can’t be perfect at it. There’s always going to be mistakes, and there always will be room for improvement. But for me, I don’t have a goal of becoming the perfect archer. My goal is to strive to become the perfect archer, and I think that’s what all the competitive archers do. We’re all running the race to try to reach a finish line that we know we never can reach, but it’s in the striving, the trying, the working and continuing to try to improve and reduce the number of mistakes we make that we have a chance to become the best archers we ever can be.

Question: How does target archery fit into your bowhunting?

Perkins: Target archery fits perfectly into my bowhunting, because archery competitions are primarily held in the spring and summer, and our hunting season in Canada doesn’t start until October. All the competitive shooting is basically over by then, at least for me, so after the tournament archery season is over, I’m tuned up, my bows are tuned up, and I’m ready to go hunting. And, remember, I started shooting target archery so that I could become a better bowhunter, and I think that these sports complement each other. If you want to be a better bowhunter, become a better target archer.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Christopher Perkins Wins the Gold Cup


PSE's Christopher Perkins

PSE’s Christopher Perkins

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. How did he do it, and what has he learned that can help you become a target archer and bowhunter? (Perkins enjoys both sports.)

Question: Christopher, where was the Gold Cup held?

Perkins: Bloomingfield, New Jersey.

Question: How many contestants were in your division?

Perkins: There were only 10 or 12 of us, so it wasn’t a very big shoot.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.

Question: How far were you shooting?

Perkins: We were shooting at 70 meters. Normally we shoot at 50 meters, and I don’t understand why they had us at 70. The shoot has gotten to be a smaller shoot, not nearly as big as it has been in the past.

Question: How many times did you miss the center of the target?

Perkins: I missed the dot 5 times out of 72 arrows.

Question: Christopher, what causes you to miss?

Perkins: I just made some bad shots. When you’re shooting at that distance there are a lot of variables. At that distance, the wind can have an effect on your accuracy. You can make a good shot, but the wind can blow your arrow off the target. I think basically I didn’t make as clean a shot as I should have made.

Question: How do you correct a bad shot on the next shot?

Perkins: Often you’ll basically know what you did wrong, so you go back through your shot procedure and correct that mistake. Most of the time it’s only a little tiny correction that you have to make.

Question: What caused you to miss at the Gold Cup shoot?

Perkins: I probably was a little weak on the shot, and the arrow didn’t come off the string as fast as it should have. So, on the next shot, I made sure I had the bow all the way back to the wall.

Question: Christopher, how many tournaments do you shoot each year?

Perkins: I’ll probably shoot 10 or 12 during the course of a season.

Question: How much are you practicing to get ready for each of those tournaments?

Perkins: I practice every day, and I try to shoot 300 or 400 arrows in a day. I shoot in the morning and then shoot in the afternoon and take a mid-day break. But when you’re shooting that many arrows, your practice session is more or less an all-day event.

Question: So, you’re shooting between 150 and 200 arrows in the morning and the same number of arrows in the afternoon. How many shots do you make before you go pull arrows, and who’s pulling the arrows for you?

Perkins: I shoot 6 arrows before I pull the arrows, and I’m the one who goes to get them and bring them back. I spend most of the day shooting and pulling arrows.

Question: Do you have an archery coach?

Perkins: Yeah, kinda. Greg Nielsen was my first archery coach, and my last coach was Kathy Millar.

Question: What’s the advantage of having an archery coach?

Perkins: When I first started shooting target archery, the archery coach could say, “Okay, you’re doing this wrong, here’s what you need to do to fix it.” I’ve been shooting so much for so long now that I now know what I do wrong when I’m not shooting right, and I know what I need to do to fix the problem.

Tomorrow: What the Future Holds for PSE’s Christopher Perkins

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Stabilizers: What do they do and why you need one – Q & A with PSE’s Bobby V


Bobby V talks about Stabilizers. To see other’s opinions on the question, go to our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/OfficialPSEArchery.


PSE’s Christopher Perkins Discusses the Other 50 Percent of Target Archery – The Mental Aspect


PSE's Christopher Perkins

PSE’s Christopher Perkins

Question: Christopher, how do you handle the mental aspect of archery?

Perkins: I think the classic example occurred at the Redding Shoot. I was in the shoot off in day 2 and day 3. I think the real secret when you’ve got that much pressure on you at a tournament is to forget all about the tournament, the other competitor, the crowd behind you, where you are in the standings, what a win can mean to you, and what a loss will mean to you. Instead, focus on shooting that one arrow the best you possibly can. In the shoot off, the lad I was competing against missed the dot, so I told myself, “Okay, he missed the dot. All you’ve got to do is to hit the dot. Whether you hit the center, the edge, the top or the bottom, if you hit the dot, the tournament’s over. So just shoot your normal shot at the center of the dot.” Next, I forgot all about just having to hit the dot and focused on shooting for the center of the dot as I always do, and I focused on trying to make the best shot I could make.

Question: What yardage were you shooting?

Perkins: We were shooting at 88 yards. One of the advantages I had was that I’d been in this position previously. Every tournament you enter and every contest that you come close to winning, you feel the same pressure that you’ll feel in a big contest, and that’s the reason that building experience and shooting a lot of different tournaments can help you handle the mental side of the game. You can say to yourself, “I’ve been here before, I’ve performed well before, and I’ve got every reason to believe that I’ll perform that well again.” You also know that you’ve shot consistently all the way through the tournament, and you expect this last shot to be as good as the rest of them have been, if you execute the shot the same way that you’ve executed it before. The real secret to shooting well in a big tournament is to make sure you shoot exactly like you shoot in practice, exactly like you shoot in little tournaments and exactly like you shoot in big tournaments. Then when you get to a major tournament, you reasonably can expect yourself to shoot like you’ve always shot.

Question: How far out do you think you’re accurate with your PSE bow?

Perkins: The dot at 88 yards is 5 cm, which is about 2.5 inches. In target competition, we shoot that same dot at 90 meters, which is 103 yards, and I can hit the dot at that distance.

Question: How do you hold steady shooting at that range? If you breathe wrong, your shot may be off.

Perkins: Breathing is a part of practice. We use a stabilizer, and if your stabilizer is weighted up properly, when you put the pin on the dot at that yardage, the bow should be steady in your hand. You should be able to make the shot, if you follow your shot routine.

Question: What weight of bow are you pulling?

Perkins: I pull 59.5 to 59.9 pounds. You can’t be over 60 pounds, so I want to crowd my poundage as much as I can without going over.

Question: What sight system are you using?

Perkins: I shoot the Axcel AX3000.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Christopher Perkins Wins the Gold Cup

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Why PSE’s Christopher Perkins Decided to Shoot the Western Classic Trail Shoot in Redding This Year


PSE's Christopher Perkins

PSE’s Christopher Perkins

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. How did he do it, and what has he learned that can help you become a target archer and bowhunter? (Perkins enjoys both sports.)

Question: Christopher, why did you decide to go to the Redding Trail Shoot?

Perkins: I was in Kentucky, and I heard a lot of people talking about this shoot. Everyone at the tournament in Kentucky said that Redding was a lot of fun to shoot and that it was a must for tournament archers. So I booked a plane ticket, and my girlfriend, Katie Roth, went with me.

Question: What was it like going to a tournament and shooting targets that you’d never shot before?

Perkins: I thought it was a very neat experience. The main reason I went was to see what all the shoot involved. I like to go to new tournaments, because I meet new people, and I can try different aspects of archery. I knew a little bit about shooting 3D targets, because that’s the way I started shooting tournament archery. But I’d never shot 3D archery with so many uphill and downhill angles.

Question: How do you handle competing against so many other archers?

Perkins: The number of people in an archery tournament doesn’t really bother me. I never look at the standings at a tournament. Usually the only time I ever look at the standings is after the tournament is over. At home, I only shoot against two or three people, so I had to stay on my feet quite a bit to compete with that many people.

PSE's Christopher Perkins

PSE’s Christopher Perkins

Question: Why don’t you keep up with the standings in a big tournament like this?

Perkins: I’ve seen archers get very anxious before, either because they’re behind or ahead, and then they think they’ve got a chance to win, or they’re afraid they’ll lose. I’ve seen archers get all nervous and excited when they’re in the lead, and that pressure may cause them to not perform as well. So, I’ve never really paid that much attention to the standings. All I really concentrate on at a tournament is the next arrow I have to shoot. When I come to the line to take my shot, I don’t really want to know where I am in the standings. I just want to concentrate on my shot routine and making this next shot the very best I can make it. When I’m at a tournament, I try to focus only on what I’m doing and not think about what anyone else is doing. What the other competitors are doing doesn’t really matter. The whole tournament is about how well I shoot, and that’s the only thing I can control. I try to make sure every aspect of my shot is the same as every aspect of my shot when I’m practicing at home.

Question: How do you go through your shot routine?

Perkins: First, I make sure that I’m standing on the line correctly. Then, I make sure I put the arrow on the string correctly, and I want to concentrate my shot on the middle of the dot. I want to make sure my draw is smooth and that it feels the same way it does when I shoot at home. I want to anchor the shot at the same spot I always do, and I want to rely heavily on the muscle memory that I’ve built up. I make sure I feel my hand on my face, I’m conscious of looking through the peep sight and I want to look at the dot on the target and put my pin sight in the center. Once I execute the shot, I keep my eyes on the target and make sure I have a clean follow through. I never shoot at the dot. I always shoot at the center of the dot. Many people just try and shoot the dot, but I try to make a dead center shot in the dot every time I release the arrow. I’m trying to make the best shot I’ve ever made, each time I step to the line to shoot. If I’ve followed my shot routine exactly and relied on my muscle memory, then every shot should be in the center of the dot.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Christopher Perkins Discusses the Other 50 Percent of Target Archery…Mental

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Christopher Perkins Wins Redding Trail Shoot and Gold Cup


Chris Perkins Takes the World Record!!

PSE’s Christopher Perkins

PSE’s Christopher Perkins Wins Redding Trail Shoot and Gold Cup

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. How did he do it, and what has he learned that can help you become a target archer and bowhunter? (Perkins enjoys both sports.)

Question: Christopher, what bow are you shooting now in tournament archery?

Perkins: I shoot the PSE Dominator Pro.

Question: Why are you shooting that bow?

Perkins: I fell in love with this bow in 2011 when it was first introduced. This year (2012), PSE optimized the cams and made the bow even better than last year’s model. I like the bow, and it shoots well.

Question: In three weeks in May of 2012, you made $18,000 in tournament archery. What tournaments did you shoot?

Perkins: The first week in May I went to the Western Classic Trail Shoot in Redding, California. The tournament is often called the Redding Trail Shoot. I won the male pro division competing against more than 150 or 200 people. I made about $16,000 at that shoot. Then I shot the Gold Cup in New Jersey and placed first in that tournament, and that tournament paid about $2,000.

Question: Christopher, how long have you been shooting tournament archery?

Perkins: About 9 years, but I didn’t start out to be a tournament archery shooter. My dad was a bowhunter, and he bought me a bow. I started shooting targets, so that I could get ready to go bowhunting when I was old enough. My dad heard of some 3D archery tournaments that were being conducted in our area, and he took me to the shoots. When I learned that there was a target aspect of shooting the bow, I tried that type of competition and really liked it.

PSE's 2012 Dominator Pro

PSE’s 2012 Dominator Pro

Question: What do you like about shooting target archery?

Perkins: I get to travel and meet a lot of new people – even from different countries. Archery is a very friendly sport, when you’re on the line competing, and when you come off the line to talk with the other archers you meet at a tournament. And, shooting archery is fun for me.

Question: Okay, the first tournament you won money in this year was the Redding tournament. What kind of tournament is that?

Perkins: This tournament is an NFAA Marked 3D championship. 3D targets are set up at different distances at known distances. For instance, when you go up to the line, they’ll tell you the target is at 35 yards, but you don’t know the yardage cut or how you have to estimate aiming, because the targets are set on an incline or a decline. So, even though you know the distance to the target, you don’t know how much the angle of the target increases or decreases or how you have to sight in on that target. Each target has an orange dot on it. If you center the dot with your arrow, you get 11 points. Each one of the targets is set up at a different yardage, and you are permitted to use a range finder. Some of the range finders will calculate the cut for you. The one I was using gave me the cut.

Question: What range finder were you using?

Perkins: I was using a Leupold RX 1000 with DNA (Digitally eNhanced Accuracy). This range finder belonged to one of my buddies. I didn’t really have a rangefinder that I felt comfortable going to this tournament with, so I asked my buddy if I could borrow his. I liked this range finder so much that after the tournament I bought one. It costs about $400 or $500. This was my first time to ever go to Redding, so I wanted to go with a very reliable range finder. I wanted a range finder that would calculate the true distance to the target, whether it was uphill or downhill. I don’t know how it works. I guess it has some kind of ballistic table, but I found that this range finder was dead on. Whatever it determined the range was, that’s what I dialed in my sights to shoot. We shot 70 targets during the weekend, and I only missed 7 dots.

Tomorrow: Why PSE’s Christopher Perkins Decided to Shoot the Western Classic Trail Shoot in Redding This Year

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Why PSE’s Marty Henrikson Believes Everyone Should Shoot 3D Archery


PSE’s Marty Henrikson

PSE’s Marty Henrikson

Editor’s Note: Many of the best archers in the nation, never start out trying to become the best target archers in the nation. Many of these archers are bowhunters who decide to shoot target archery in the off season to increase their shooting proficiency. Off season target practice helps them to develop better mental attitudes and confidence to better equip them for taking shots when they’re hunting and animals come within bow range. When you’re shooting with a group of target archers, whether you’re shooting dots or 3D targets, when you step up to the line, all eyes will be on you. Everyone is looking at you, hoping that you won’t shoot as accurately as they have. When you first start shooting, you feel the same pressure that you may feel if a buck steps out in front of you within range. However, the more you shoot target archery in the off season, the less that pressure will affect you.  Whether you’re shooting 3D or dots, you learn to focus and concentrate on hitting a small part of a much larger target. Your target archery practice will come in handy when the deer, the elk, the bear or any other big game animal steps in front of you in a hunting situation. Instead of trying to shoot the entire animal, you can focus and aim at a small spot on that animal and be confident that you will shoot accurately. Too, when you’re hunting, a range finder can help you determine the distance of specific objects from your stand. However, many times an animal will come in from a direction you haven’t ranged, and you won’t know the distance of the animal. So, 3D targets can be helpful in preparing for situations like these to practice shooting at unknown distances. Many outdoorsmen are convinced that to become better bowhunters, they need to consider the possibility of shooting target archery this summer. You’ll not only be a better shooter, but you’ll be able to shoot with more confidence, one of the most critical elements for shooting accurately.

Question: Marty, why have you continued to hunt with PSE bows for 36 years?

The main thing I look for in a bow is how reliable is it. When you’ve got a big game animal in front of you that you really want to take, that’s not the time to have a problem with your bow. I’ve found that PSE bows are always smooth. Too, as I’ve aged, the PSE technology has continued to improve over the years. I’ve been able to turn down the weight of my PSE bows and still shoot with more energy coming out of the bow than previous bows I’ve used.

Question: What poundage of bow have you shot in the past, and how many pounds are you presently pulling?

Years ago I shot a 90 pound bow now. Today, I shoot bows in the 60 and 70 pound range, and these PSE bows are producing more energy with less weight than the bows I once shot.

Question: Marty, how much did shooting tournament archery help you as a bowhunter?

Shooting tournament archery was the most valuable tool I utilized to improve my accuracy. Whenever I leave a 3D archery shoot, I am reminded that I can shoot accurately at any range. I developed a great deal of confidence at shooting all types of targets, including different measures of angles and under any conditions. When range finder technology first came into use in the archery industry, my shooting became more accurate. In the early days, we missed a lot of critters, because the bows were slower, and we hadn’t become proficient in estimating distance. 3D archery has helped to increase this accuracy.

Question: Marty, why would you suggest for a newcomer to the sport of archery to shoot tournament archery during the hunting off season?

I know this greatly will improve his accuracy in the field. Too, tournament archer will increase the newcomer’s confidence and his ability to shoot the bow at any targets and distances, whether he’s shooting dots, 3D archery or taking game.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Marty Henrikson Has Bear’s Teeth and Claws at 15 Yards


PSE’s Marty Henrikson

PSE’s Marty Henrikson

Editor’s Note:  Marty Henrikson of Tucson, Arizona, has been shooting PSE bows for 36 years. Henrikson, an avid bowhunter, competed for many years on the 3D archery circuit and also won the Arizona Cup in the compound division.

Question: Marty, tell us about your close encounter with a big bear.

I was hunting during springtime in Santa Rita. My friend and I both drew bear tags, and we’d been waiting a long time to get a tag for a certain area. These tags were hard to come by, so we were really excited. Eight weekends before the hunt we spent time setting up trail cameras, scouting water holes and glassing, looking for bears. We found a decent population of bears in a certain part of the region we were to hunt. We decided to make this the section of land where we would set up and hunt from there. On the second day of the hunt, my friend had gone to sit around a water hole, and I was stalking. I spotted some bears coming up to a cut. I knew that once the sun started to come up, the bears wouldn’t want to stay out in the open but would prefer to get into thick cover. I decided that I’d try and use a predator call to call one of the bears back to where I was. I sat up on a rock that was somewhat elevated and I started blowing on a jack rabbit in distress call. However, I blew the call to make it sound like a baby bear squalling. I had been blowing on the call for about 20 minutes and was almost ready to give up. Suddenly, I heard something in the bushes, and I looked up to see a big black bear coming toward me.

While the bear was making his way toward my call, he kept trying to get downwind of me. The bear wanted to smell what he was hearing, before he made the decision to come in completely. I decided to keep calling and let the bear continue to come in, knowing that at a particular point he would cross my scent trail, smell me and probably take off. I decided that I had to take the bear before he reached that scent trail. As the bear continued to come closer, the situation felt increasingly intense. I could see that this was a really big bear, and he looked to weigh between 350 and 400 pounds. Finally, the bear came to within 15 yards from where I was and turned broadside. I knew he was only seconds away from smelling me. Fortunately, I was able to get my bow pulled back and hang on to my composure long enough to be able to aim carefully and release the arrow. I hit the bear right in the lungs. Surprisingly, the bear didn’t run, but just turned and walked about 10 steps away. Then he looked back at me, and fell over.  I took that bear with a PSE AR 34.

Tomorrow: Why PSE’s Marty Henrikson Believes Everyone Should Shoot 3D Archery

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


How To Setup Your Sights – Q & A with PSE’s Bobby V


Bobby V explains the proper way to sight in your bow. To see other’s opinions on the question, go to our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/OfficialPSEArchery.


The Elk Hunt That Took PSE’s Marty Henrikson 10 Years


 

PSE’s Marty Henrikson

PSE’s Marty Henrikson

Editor’s Note:  Marty Henrikson of Tucson, Arizona, has been shooting PSE bows for 36 years. Henrikson, an avid bowhunter, competed for many years on the 3D archery circuit and also won the Arizona Cup in the compound division.

Question: Marty, tell us about the elk that took you 10 years to hunt.

One of the prime units for taking trophy elk in Arizona is Unit 10, and I had made up my mind that I was going to hunt this unit. Since Unit 10 was known for having giant elk, I decided that regardless of how long the hunt took, I was going to hunt the unit. For 10 years, I put in to hunt this unit, and finally on the 10th year, I was drawn. When I finally drew the tag, I was more than excited. I made a point to scout the unit before the hunt. On the second day of the hunt, I was up and moving long before daylight. I went to a spot where I thought I could hear elk bugling, and I bugled before first light. I had elk bugling all around me. I could tell there was a bull in the distance that was moving my way. I was hunting with a friend of mine, who stayed behind me to do the calling. Just at daylight, my friend made three cow calls, and we watched the bull come in until he was about 30 to 40 yards away from us. I drew the bow and was at full draw, when I think the bull spotted me. The bull expected to see the cow that had been calling, and when he didn’t see her but saw me instead, he turned back and went in the direction from which he had come. However, when the bull was at about 60 yards, he turned and looked back, giving me a broadside shot. I took the shot with my PSE Mach 6. After the elk went down, I went over to him, and my buddy went to get the truck. We spent 3 hours skinning, field dressing and butchering the animal. Fortunately, we didn’t have too far to carry the meat once it was quartered, since my friend was able to bring the truck fairly close to where we were. This bull had a 52 inch wide spread and scored 135 inches.

One of the advantages of shooting tournament archery is that you have the opportunity to build a lot of confidence in your ability to shoot accurately from many different distances. In the West where I hunt, most of the archers practice shooting out to 100 yards. Our terrain is so open that most of the time you expect to have to take a shot at more than 30 yards. If you practice at distances from 0 to 100 yards, you can build your confidence to know you can make a 100 yard shot. Then, if an animal shows up inside 100 yards, you will feel confident in your ability to make a good shot, and the arrow will fly true. Because of this 100 yard practice shooting, I felt really confident that I could make a lethal hit on an elk size target at 60 yards. That was a great hunt, and this is the biggest elk I’d ever taken.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Marty Henrikson Has Bear’s Teeth and Claws at 15 Yards

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Marty Henrikson Takes a 170 Class Bow Buck


PSE’s Marty Henrikson

PSE’s Marty Henrikson

Editor’s Note:  Marty Henrikson of Tucson, Arizona, has been shooting PSE bows for 36 years. Henrikson, an avid bowhunter, competed for many years on the 3D archery circuit and also won the Arizona Cup in the compound division.

Question: Tell us about another deer you’ve taken with your PSE bow.

In 1973, I took a very memorable mule deer. I glassed him when he was up on a hill, and then he moved down into some flats. I had seen the buck in the morning and went back later in the day to try and hunt him. He had been traveling with a lot of does in the morning, and that made him hard to stalk.  When I went back in the afternoon, I found the buck again, but he only had one doe with him. So, I was certain I could get in close enough to get a shot, and I started stalking the deer. Moving silently, and using the terrain and cover to keep the buck from seeing me, I came to within 30 yards of the deer. When I’m stalking, I like to use my binoculars to see how and where the deer is moving. I only will take a half or one whole step before taking another look at the deer. I’ve learned that by going slow, and constantly reading the deer’s attitude as well as his movement, I can make better decisions on when and where to move, and where the deer is going.

After I had moved about 15 yards, the doe spotted me and started stomping her feet. When the doe saw me, I was on my knees crawling. Although she knew there was something moving in front of her, she wasn’t really sure what I was. She continued to close the distance between us, but was at full alert. The doe walked up to within 35 yards of me, and then started to turn to leave the area. The doe was out in front of the buck and now was staring at me. I went ahead and drew my bow, but the buck still wasn’t sure of what I was. So, he hesitated. Before the buck turned to leave, he gave me just enough time to release my arrow. I took that buck with a PSE Mach 6. When I saw that the big 170 class buck was down, I walked over to him and marked a waypoint on my GPS receiver. I always carry a hand held GPS receiver in my pack. Usually I have to walk to the truck and get my freighter pack and then walk back to the deer to butcher and pack him out. That hand held GPS makes finding your deer much easier when you go back in to bring him out. The type of country I hunt usually doesn’t give its hunters the advantage of being able to get an animal to the nearest road. Most western hunters know that when we take a mule deer or a Coues deer, we will have to do our own field dressing, skinning and packing the animal out in the field. For this reason, I always bring along a frame pack and a GPS. I don’t like to hunt with a frame pack on my back, so I usually leave it in the truck. I’ll mark a waypoint spot where I park the truck on the GPS and then also mark a waypoint where I leave the deer. When I mark these waypoint spots, it makes traveling to and from the truck and my deer quicker and easier. I can get to my pack, go back to the deer, carry out the first load of meat, make a return trip and depending on how big the animal is, get the rest of the deer out as soon as possible

Tomorrow: The Elk Hunt That Took PSE’s Marty Henrikson 10 Years

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Frank Pearson Talks about the Myth of Target Panic


PSE’s Frank Pearson

PSE’s Frank Pearson

Editor’s Note: Frank Pearson, owner and operator of the Frank Pearson School of Archery and the personal archery coach for Pete Shepley, founder and owner of PSE Archery, has seen the evolution of the bow from the longbow when he first started shooting and competed with up to today’s modern bows and most technical PSE equipment. If anyone knows archery, and how to help an archer shoot better, you can rely on Pearson. This week Frank Pierson will give us practical tips on how to shoot better, whether you are a tournament archer or a bowhunter.

Question: Frank, how do you solve the problem of target panic?

Never use the words, target panic again. The real problem is distance panic. The way we solve this problem is I have the archer stand 3 yards from the target, put a 3 inch spot on that target, have the archer pull the bow back, line up the target in the rear sight, put his front sight in the middle of that dot and go through his shot routine with a long follow through after the shot. When he or she releases the arrow, I want the archer to stand in position like an archery mannequin. If you remain in the same position after the shot as you’ve been in before the shot, an animal never will see you move, and you’ll have a clean follow through. But, if you let your release arm fly around after the shot, and an animal spots you, sometimes it can duck the shot. Then you’ll have to add another 100 yards to your tracking before you find your animal, because it saw you move. The first night of practice before bow season should be at 3 yards. The next night, move the target back to 4 yards from where you’re shooting. The next night, move the target out to 5 yards. Continue to move the target at 1 yard increments, and adjust your sights until you are shooting 45 yards accurately. Use this system every night, until you have your target at 45 yards. Then you’ll realize there’s no such thing as target panic or buck fever. You can’t get rid of target panic by trying to shoot a 60 yard target. If you have target panic at 60 yards and continue to shoot 60 yards, you’ll have target panic forever. But if you start off shooting at 3 yards with your 60 yard pin and then sight in at 4 yards to hit the target in the center every time at 4 yards, you consistently move that target back 1 yard per day, and you consistently sight in and shoot each day accurately, then you’ll see that you can shoot accurately at any distance that you want to take a shot. You show me an archer that has target panic, and I‘ll show you an archer who refuses to use this system to eliminate target panic. They may think they’re too good as shooters to start off shooting at 3 yards and move the target 1 yard every day. Or, perhaps they’re too lazy to put this much time and effort into solving the problem.

Question: Frank, why have you stayed in archery as long as you have?

My wife says it’s because I like it, and I guess that’s true. We have 14 fields set up here at my house for shooting archery. They are much like a golf course, so that the students can shoot from 10 yards to 8 yards from 14 different stations. My play room in my house is 3,000 feet with 10 foot ceilings, so I can shoot 30 yards indoors. My play room is also set up, so that I can open my side door, stand inside and shoot outside up to 50 yards if there’s rain, or the weather’s too hot to go outside. I guess I am eaten up with the sport of archery. And I don’t think that is a bad thing.

For more information go to http://www.frankpearson.com

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Frank Pearson Tells What You Learn at Archery School


PSE’s Frank Pearson

PSE’s Frank Pearson

Editor’s Note: Frank Pearson, owner and operator of the Frank Pearson School of Archery and the personal archery coach for Pete Shepley, founder and owner of PSE Archery, has seen the evolution of the bow from the longbow when he first started shooting and competed with up to today’s modern bows and most technical PSE equipment. If anyone knows archery, and how to help an archer shoot better, you can rely on Pearson. This week Frank Pierson will give us practical tips on how to shoot better, whether you are a tournament archer or a bowhunter.

Question: Frank, how long does your archery school last?

The school lasts for 2 days, and most of my students either work in the archery department of large sporting goods stores, or they are owners of bow shops that they are about to open. These people must know how to fit their customers with the right weight bow and the right draw length. They also come to learn how to teach people how to shoot their bows accurately. They also need to know how to fletch arrows and make bow strings and cables. I also coach tournament archers who have won world championships. Tim Gillingham, who works with Gold Tip Arrows has been one of my students.

Question: Frank, you and your wife still compete in archery don’t you? How long do you think you can continue to be a competitive shooter?

Yes, my wife and I still compete. And, I think I can continue to shoot competitive archery as long as my body holds up. My body feels better this year than it has in the last 5 years. About 2 years ago I had to have stents put in my arteries, because they were clogged up with cholesterol. I had to take some medicine, and when the doctors took me off the medicine, I decided the medicine was messing up my archery. I began to feel better and shoot better. I am 72 years, old, I’m starting to get my strength back, and I’m shooting better.

Question: Frank, how big of a role does your mental attitude play in your ability to shoot accurately?

If you have a bow that fits you pretty good, you haven’t taken any lessons on shooting the bow, you’ve bought a handful of arrows and a target, and every night when you’ve come home from work, you shoot 10 or 15 arrows in the back yard, then after a few months, you’ll be a pretty good shot. After you reach that point, then the rest of the sport of archery and shooting accurately and consistently is mental. You need the strength to pull a bow back, and you need to make sure that somebody hasn’t sold you a 70 pound bow, and you only have a 50 pound bow body. With the new PSE bows. I’m shooting 51 pounds, and my arrows are traveling at 300 feet per second, so everything else is mental. The most critical part of your mental attitude to shoot accurately is what you’re thinking about when you pull the bow back.

Question: What should you be thinking about when you first start your draw, and what should you be thinking about all the way through drawing the bow?

When you pull the bow back, if you’re concerned about taking a big game animal or hitting a target, instead of being concerned about going correctly through your shot routine, then you’re in trouble. If you have a shot routine and go through the four steps of your shot routine just as you start to draw the bow and all the way through your follow through, you’ll be much more successful and shoot more accurately than if you’re thinking about the target. Here are the four things I recommend that you do in your shot routine, depending on the equipment you’re using:

  • Make sure your arrow is on the string properly.
  • Be certain your arrow is on the rest properly.
  • Make sure you’re looking through the peep sight and that the pin you’re using to aim with is in the center of the peep sight, when you draw the bow.
  • Follow through with your shot when you release the arrow.

If the bowhunter who comes home every day after work and shoots 10 or 15 arrows in the back yard, goes through this shot routine every time he prepares to shoot an arrow, then he drastically improves his chance for success on every hunt. Most of the time when the hunter or the target archer misses, he or she hasn’t gone through the shot routine before the shot or have misjudged the distance to the target.

Question: Frank, how should the arrow sit on the string?

Most archers today use a d-loop on their bow strings, and they attach a mechanical release to the d-loop, instead of to the string. Most of the time there is a little more space in the d-loop than is required for the nock of the arrow. The reason for that space is because when you get the bow back to full draw, the angle of the string changes. So, you have to make sure your arrow fits tight on the string. I always put my nock at the top of the d-loop and then slide the nock up and snap it on.

Question: How does the arrow need to sit on the rest?

If you are using a drop away rest, you have to make sure that the arrow is sitting on the drop away and not sitting on the shelf. If you get all excited because there is a great big elk in front of you, and you put the arrow on the shelf and not the drop away, then when you draw the arrow back, it still will be sitting on the shelf and not the drop away, and you’ll miss the shot. There is a certain way that the arrow needs to sit on each type of rest, and if you don’t make sure the arrow is sitting where it’s supposed to on the rest you’re shooting before you take the shot, you won’t shoot accurately. Some people shoot with a launcher blade that has the stem sitting up and a V in the top of the stem. If you put the cock vein up on the rest, you will shoot accurately. But if you put the arrow on the string with the cock vein down, the arrow will come out of the bow, the cock vein will hit the rest, and you will miss the shot. Therefore, depending on the type of rest you’re using, you have to make sure before you take the shot that the arrow is in the proper position for the kind of rest you have before you draw the bow.

Question: The third part of the shot routine that you mentioned was to make sure you’re looking though your peep site before you take the shot. Then make sure the pin that you’re aiming with on the front of the bow is in the center of the peep site. Is that correct?

Absolutely. If the front pin is not right in the center of the peep site before you release the arrow, you won’t shoot as accurately as you can.

Question: The fourth step of the shot routine is follow through. Why is that so important?

When you have the bow at full draw, and you’re preparing to take the shot, you want to make sure you have the equal amount of pressure with the hand you’re using to hold the bow and an equal amount of pressure of the hand you’re using to draw the string. If you don’t feel the same amount of pressure on your bow hand that you feel on the hand that has the release in it, you won’t get a good shot. I recommend that you have 2 pounds of pressure push on the bow hand and 2 pounds of pressure on the release hand. If you don’t have equal pressure on both hands before you take the shot, you can’t have a good follow through, and the follow through is critical for a good shot.

For more information go to http://www.frankpearson.com.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Frank Pearson Talks about the Myth of Target Panic

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Take Care of Your Bowhunting Equipment to Shoot Accurately with PSE’s Frank Pearson


PSE's Frank Pearson

PSE’s Frank Pearson

Editor’s Note: Frank Pearson, owner and operator of the Frank Pearson School of Archery and the personal archery coach for Pete Shepley, founder and owner of PSE Archery, has seen the evolution of the bow from the longbow when he first started shooting and competed with up to today’s modern bows and most technical PSE equipment. If anyone knows archery, and how to help an archer shoot better, you can rely on Pearson. This week Frank Pierson will give us practical tips on how to shoot better, whether you are a tournament archer or a bowhunter.

Question: Frank, what is another problem that you see that target archers and hunters have that causes them to not shoot as accurately as they can.

They don’t take care of their equipment properly. Their strings and cables have to stay constantly waxed. You’ve got to keep your bow out of the heat. If you put your bow in a bow case and put that bow case in the trunk, and the sun is beating down on the trunk for several hours or maybe all day, the strings and the cables on your bow will stretch. Then when you arrive at the tournament or the hunt, your cam is out of time, and the bow doesn’t fit you the way it has before you’ve put it in the trunk. If your string stretches, your draw length gets longer, and your arrow goes faster than it did before you put the bow in the trunk. If the cable stretches, just the opposite happens. Your draw becomes shorter, the bow doesn’t weigh as much when you pull it back, and the arrow goes slower than it did when you put the bow in the trunk. Many times the reason archers don’t shoot accurately at tournaments or when hunting is because they haven’t cared properly for their bows on the way to the hunt or the tournament. You solve this problem by placing the bow in its case inside your car not in the trunk. If the weather is really hot, leave your windows down. Many times when people call bow manufacturers and complain about the performance of their bows, the problem is not the bow, but rather the way the shooter did not take care of the bow. Today’s modern bows are very finely tuned instruments. If you are a surveyor, you know that your transit is a very finely tuned instrument that has to be cared for and kept out of the elements as much as possible. If you don’t give your bow that same type of special attention that a surveyor gives to his transit, you shouldn’t expect peak performance from that bow, when you’re shooting the last round of a archery tournament or a buck of a lifetime steps out in front of you within range.

For more information go to http://www.frankpearson.com.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Frank Pearson Tells What You Learn at Archery School
To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


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