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In 2013, PSE Now Offers Color Dampers!


2013 PSE Color Dampers

2013 PSE Color Dampers

PSE is now offering our popular line of damping accessories in colors. Allowing for customization of each bow, each piece is durable, effective and gives a custom look without a custom price. Color kits allow for a total bow “makeover” , individual pieces allow for splashes of color or the ability to have multiple colors on the same bow. Our new limb bands require no bow press and are easily attached to solid or split limb platforms!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


2013 PSE Custom Colors are here!


DESIGN YOUR OWN CUSTOM BOW!

2013 PSE Custom Bow Colors

2013 PSE Custom Bow Colors

Monday, October 1st, we are launching our 2013 PSE Product line! Pre-order from your local PSE Dealer! Here are our custom colors for the year! Lots of surprises to come! :)

Jon Shepley and the engineers at PSE spend a great deal of time designing our bow line each year. They do everything possible to offer a wide selection of bow options that will satisfy the needs of most archers. But, there are customers who need or want something a little different. What if you want a special color that we don’t offer in our catalog? That’s why we created the PSE Special Service Custom Shop. Through our Custom Shop you can let your imagination run wild. Using the multitude of existing components, the Custom Shop can possibly make a one of a kind bow,  just for you.

Important Note:  Not all desired configurations will be possible and always remember our catalog offerings are designed by our engineers for optimal performance.

Are you looking for that special color for your compound bows? We now have many colors to choose from.  Colors will vary from run to run and are available only for Compound bows.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


2012 Dream Season EVO Bow Give Away!


Go to Facebook at www.facebook.com/OfficialPSEArchery and CLICK on the enter to win tab! Sweepstakes ends August 31st, 2012. Good luck! Sweepstakes rules apply. See the app page for more details at http://bit.ly/NmqjHf.

Come and visit us at www.pse-archery.com


Enter to Win a 2012 PSE Dream Season EVO!


Enter to Win a 2012 PSE Dream Season EVO!

Enter to Win a 2012 PSE Dream Season EVO!

Click here to enter to win a new PSE bow!


James Nickols’ First PSE Buck


PSE's Field Team Member - James Nickols

PSE’s Field Team Member – James Nickols

Editor’s Note: Forty seven year old James Nickols from Sparta, Missouri, a PSE Field Team member, has been shooting PSE for 5 years. I shot another company’s bows for several years. But when PSE came out with its original Dream Season bow, I fell in love with the technology built into the bow. I also liked the company’s target archery bow, the Moneymaker. I was shooting target archery back then too, so I switched to PSE. I was shooting as a semi pro on the ASA circuit and had several top 10 places in competition archery. I got into 3D archery to help me become a better deer hunter because I was missing deer with my bow and felt shooting 3D archery would help me.

The biggest buck I’ve ever taken, I took with my PSE Dream Season. A storm was coming in to our area. I was hunting in Bruner, Missouri, about 35 miles from Springfield. About an hour before dark, the deer started moving, and I was set up in the woods in a ground blind I’d built using sticks and limbs that I picked up. I was hunting close to a white oak tree on the edge of a field, and the deer were feeding on white oak acorns. This was the only white oak tree in the area, and the only way to get close enough to that tree to make a shot was to build a ground blind.

PSE Archery - Compound Bows

PSE Archery – Compound Bows

I was wearing Mossy Oak Bottom Land, and that pattern really blended in well with the limbs and branches I’d used for my ground blind. I was wearing Scent Lok base layer and had sprayed down with Dead Down Wind odor eliminator. The deer were coming out into the field and then coming to the acorn tree. I had pictures of this big buck on trail cameras, but the problem I had was that he was coming into the field from three different trails. On this day, a big thunderstorm was about an hour away. I thought the deer might feed up ahead of the storm, and that this 160-class buck hopefully would be with the other deer on the field. Forty-five minutes before dark, the buck came out into the field and started feeding about 100 yards away from my blind. He slowly fed my way. Finally, when he was 35 yards from the blind, he turned broadside, feeding with his head down. But when I drew, a huge gust of wind blew my scent directly to him. He raised his head and looked in my direction, before putting his head down and started to graze. When the deer’s head was down, I released the arrow.

I got a double lung shot and the buck only ran about 40 yards before he piled up. Just as I released the shot, the wind blew, and I lost sight of my arrow. However, I saw the buck kick his back legs in the air like a mule kick. Then he bolted and ran before going down. When I checked my deer for the entry point of the broadhead, even with that gust of wind, I was only about 2 inches off from where I was aiming. That’s one of the advantages you have with a Dream Season bow, because it shoots so hard and so fast, I’ve found the wind has little effect on the shot. This buck scored 162 Pope & Young points and some change. I was shooting the Carbon Express Game Tracker broadhead with a Maxima Hunter shaft.

I never hesitate to carry a chair, build a ground blind and shoot from the sitting position when I can’t find a tree stand site from which I want to shoot. Today, I can shoot out to 100 yards from the seated position. I don’t shoot game at that distance, but I do practice that 100-yard shot. I also can shoot fairly accurately from a tree stand at 100 yards. I’m confident I can take animals at 70 yards with my PSE bow, as long as the conditions are right.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


What the Future Holds for PSE’s Christopher Perkins


PSE's Christopher Perkins

PSE’s Christopher Perkins

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. How did he do it, and what has he learned that can help you become a target archer and bowhunter? (Perkins enjoys both sports.)

Question: What’s in the future for you?

Perkins: I’ve got the World Championships next year in Germany. I won it last year, and I’ll go back to try to defend the title. That tournament pays right around $11,000 if you win it. I’ve got to go to Ogden, Utah, in a couple of weeks to shoot Stage Three for the World Cup.

Question: How long do you think you can stay this proficient in target archery?

Perkins: Hopefully a few years. I want to shoot as long as I can. I’m certainly not going to be giving it up in the next little bit. I want to try to perfect my shooting skills. I’m not perfect, that’s for sure. I think I’ve got a long way to go, and I’m going to continue to try to get better.

Question: What do you think would be required for you to become a perfect archer?

Perkins: There’s a lot more tournaments that I need to win. I’m not the best archer I can be yet, and I know that, and it’s going to take some years and some experience for me to continue to get better.

Question: When will you decide that you’re the best archer you can be?

Perkins: I know I’ve got some years ahead of me in shooting. I know I’ve got to compete in more international events and more big tournaments, and I know that I’ve got to win more than what I’ve won in the past.

Question: How will you know when you’ve become a perfect archer?

Perkins: I don’t think archery is a sport that you can be perfect at, although you strive for perfection every time you shoot. You can be a good archer, but you can’t be perfect at it. There’s always going to be mistakes, and there always will be room for improvement. But for me, I don’t have a goal of becoming the perfect archer. My goal is to strive to become the perfect archer, and I think that’s what all the competitive archers do. We’re all running the race to try to reach a finish line that we know we never can reach, but it’s in the striving, the trying, the working and continuing to try to improve and reduce the number of mistakes we make that we have a chance to become the best archers we ever can be.

Question: How does target archery fit into your bowhunting?

Perkins: Target archery fits perfectly into my bowhunting, because archery competitions are primarily held in the spring and summer, and our hunting season in Canada doesn’t start until October. All the competitive shooting is basically over by then, at least for me, so after the tournament archery season is over, I’m tuned up, my bows are tuned up, and I’m ready to go hunting. And, remember, I started shooting target archery so that I could become a better bowhunter, and I think that these sports complement each other. If you want to be a better bowhunter, become a better target archer.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Christopher Perkins Wins the Gold Cup


PSE's Christopher Perkins

PSE’s Christopher Perkins

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. How did he do it, and what has he learned that can help you become a target archer and bowhunter? (Perkins enjoys both sports.)

Question: Christopher, where was the Gold Cup held?

Perkins: Bloomingfield, New Jersey.

Question: How many contestants were in your division?

Perkins: There were only 10 or 12 of us, so it wasn’t a very big shoot.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.

Question: How far were you shooting?

Perkins: We were shooting at 70 meters. Normally we shoot at 50 meters, and I don’t understand why they had us at 70. The shoot has gotten to be a smaller shoot, not nearly as big as it has been in the past.

Question: How many times did you miss the center of the target?

Perkins: I missed the dot 5 times out of 72 arrows.

Question: Christopher, what causes you to miss?

Perkins: I just made some bad shots. When you’re shooting at that distance there are a lot of variables. At that distance, the wind can have an effect on your accuracy. You can make a good shot, but the wind can blow your arrow off the target. I think basically I didn’t make as clean a shot as I should have made.

Question: How do you correct a bad shot on the next shot?

Perkins: Often you’ll basically know what you did wrong, so you go back through your shot procedure and correct that mistake. Most of the time it’s only a little tiny correction that you have to make.

Question: What caused you to miss at the Gold Cup shoot?

Perkins: I probably was a little weak on the shot, and the arrow didn’t come off the string as fast as it should have. So, on the next shot, I made sure I had the bow all the way back to the wall.

Question: Christopher, how many tournaments do you shoot each year?

Perkins: I’ll probably shoot 10 or 12 during the course of a season.

Question: How much are you practicing to get ready for each of those tournaments?

Perkins: I practice every day, and I try to shoot 300 or 400 arrows in a day. I shoot in the morning and then shoot in the afternoon and take a mid-day break. But when you’re shooting that many arrows, your practice session is more or less an all-day event.

Question: So, you’re shooting between 150 and 200 arrows in the morning and the same number of arrows in the afternoon. How many shots do you make before you go pull arrows, and who’s pulling the arrows for you?

Perkins: I shoot 6 arrows before I pull the arrows, and I’m the one who goes to get them and bring them back. I spend most of the day shooting and pulling arrows.

Question: Do you have an archery coach?

Perkins: Yeah, kinda. Greg Nielsen was my first archery coach, and my last coach was Kathy Millar.

Question: What’s the advantage of having an archery coach?

Perkins: When I first started shooting target archery, the archery coach could say, “Okay, you’re doing this wrong, here’s what you need to do to fix it.” I’ve been shooting so much for so long now that I now know what I do wrong when I’m not shooting right, and I know what I need to do to fix the problem.

Tomorrow: What the Future Holds for PSE’s Christopher Perkins

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Stabilizers: What do they do and why you need one – Q & A with PSE’s Bobby V


Bobby V talks about Stabilizers. To see other’s opinions on the question, go to our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/OfficialPSEArchery.


PSE’s Christopher Perkins Discusses the Other 50 Percent of Target Archery – The Mental Aspect


PSE's Christopher Perkins

PSE’s Christopher Perkins

Question: Christopher, how do you handle the mental aspect of archery?

Perkins: I think the classic example occurred at the Redding Shoot. I was in the shoot off in day 2 and day 3. I think the real secret when you’ve got that much pressure on you at a tournament is to forget all about the tournament, the other competitor, the crowd behind you, where you are in the standings, what a win can mean to you, and what a loss will mean to you. Instead, focus on shooting that one arrow the best you possibly can. In the shoot off, the lad I was competing against missed the dot, so I told myself, “Okay, he missed the dot. All you’ve got to do is to hit the dot. Whether you hit the center, the edge, the top or the bottom, if you hit the dot, the tournament’s over. So just shoot your normal shot at the center of the dot.” Next, I forgot all about just having to hit the dot and focused on shooting for the center of the dot as I always do, and I focused on trying to make the best shot I could make.

Question: What yardage were you shooting?

Perkins: We were shooting at 88 yards. One of the advantages I had was that I’d been in this position previously. Every tournament you enter and every contest that you come close to winning, you feel the same pressure that you’ll feel in a big contest, and that’s the reason that building experience and shooting a lot of different tournaments can help you handle the mental side of the game. You can say to yourself, “I’ve been here before, I’ve performed well before, and I’ve got every reason to believe that I’ll perform that well again.” You also know that you’ve shot consistently all the way through the tournament, and you expect this last shot to be as good as the rest of them have been, if you execute the shot the same way that you’ve executed it before. The real secret to shooting well in a big tournament is to make sure you shoot exactly like you shoot in practice, exactly like you shoot in little tournaments and exactly like you shoot in big tournaments. Then when you get to a major tournament, you reasonably can expect yourself to shoot like you’ve always shot.

Question: How far out do you think you’re accurate with your PSE bow?

Perkins: The dot at 88 yards is 5 cm, which is about 2.5 inches. In target competition, we shoot that same dot at 90 meters, which is 103 yards, and I can hit the dot at that distance.

Question: How do you hold steady shooting at that range? If you breathe wrong, your shot may be off.

Perkins: Breathing is a part of practice. We use a stabilizer, and if your stabilizer is weighted up properly, when you put the pin on the dot at that yardage, the bow should be steady in your hand. You should be able to make the shot, if you follow your shot routine.

Question: What weight of bow are you pulling?

Perkins: I pull 59.5 to 59.9 pounds. You can’t be over 60 pounds, so I want to crowd my poundage as much as I can without going over.

Question: What sight system are you using?

Perkins: I shoot the Axcel AX3000.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Christopher Perkins Wins the Gold Cup

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Why PSE’s Christopher Perkins Decided to Shoot the Western Classic Trail Shoot in Redding This Year


PSE's Christopher Perkins

PSE’s Christopher Perkins

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. How did he do it, and what has he learned that can help you become a target archer and bowhunter? (Perkins enjoys both sports.)

Question: Christopher, why did you decide to go to the Redding Trail Shoot?

Perkins: I was in Kentucky, and I heard a lot of people talking about this shoot. Everyone at the tournament in Kentucky said that Redding was a lot of fun to shoot and that it was a must for tournament archers. So I booked a plane ticket, and my girlfriend, Katie Roth, went with me.

Question: What was it like going to a tournament and shooting targets that you’d never shot before?

Perkins: I thought it was a very neat experience. The main reason I went was to see what all the shoot involved. I like to go to new tournaments, because I meet new people, and I can try different aspects of archery. I knew a little bit about shooting 3D targets, because that’s the way I started shooting tournament archery. But I’d never shot 3D archery with so many uphill and downhill angles.

Question: How do you handle competing against so many other archers?

Perkins: The number of people in an archery tournament doesn’t really bother me. I never look at the standings at a tournament. Usually the only time I ever look at the standings is after the tournament is over. At home, I only shoot against two or three people, so I had to stay on my feet quite a bit to compete with that many people.

PSE's Christopher Perkins

PSE’s Christopher Perkins

Question: Why don’t you keep up with the standings in a big tournament like this?

Perkins: I’ve seen archers get very anxious before, either because they’re behind or ahead, and then they think they’ve got a chance to win, or they’re afraid they’ll lose. I’ve seen archers get all nervous and excited when they’re in the lead, and that pressure may cause them to not perform as well. So, I’ve never really paid that much attention to the standings. All I really concentrate on at a tournament is the next arrow I have to shoot. When I come to the line to take my shot, I don’t really want to know where I am in the standings. I just want to concentrate on my shot routine and making this next shot the very best I can make it. When I’m at a tournament, I try to focus only on what I’m doing and not think about what anyone else is doing. What the other competitors are doing doesn’t really matter. The whole tournament is about how well I shoot, and that’s the only thing I can control. I try to make sure every aspect of my shot is the same as every aspect of my shot when I’m practicing at home.

Question: How do you go through your shot routine?

Perkins: First, I make sure that I’m standing on the line correctly. Then, I make sure I put the arrow on the string correctly, and I want to concentrate my shot on the middle of the dot. I want to make sure my draw is smooth and that it feels the same way it does when I shoot at home. I want to anchor the shot at the same spot I always do, and I want to rely heavily on the muscle memory that I’ve built up. I make sure I feel my hand on my face, I’m conscious of looking through the peep sight and I want to look at the dot on the target and put my pin sight in the center. Once I execute the shot, I keep my eyes on the target and make sure I have a clean follow through. I never shoot at the dot. I always shoot at the center of the dot. Many people just try and shoot the dot, but I try to make a dead center shot in the dot every time I release the arrow. I’m trying to make the best shot I’ve ever made, each time I step to the line to shoot. If I’ve followed my shot routine exactly and relied on my muscle memory, then every shot should be in the center of the dot.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Christopher Perkins Discusses the Other 50 Percent of Target Archery…Mental

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Christopher Perkins Wins Redding Trail Shoot and Gold Cup


Chris Perkins Takes the World Record!!

PSE’s Christopher Perkins

PSE’s Christopher Perkins Wins Redding Trail Shoot and Gold Cup

Editor’s Note: Christopher Perkins from Athens, Ontario, Canada, has been shooting for PSE for the last 2 years. In 4 weeks, this 20 year old earned $18,000 in two professional archery tournaments – not bad for a summer job. How did he do it, and what has he learned that can help you become a target archer and bowhunter? (Perkins enjoys both sports.)

Question: Christopher, what bow are you shooting now in tournament archery?

Perkins: I shoot the PSE Dominator Pro.

Question: Why are you shooting that bow?

Perkins: I fell in love with this bow in 2011 when it was first introduced. This year (2012), PSE optimized the cams and made the bow even better than last year’s model. I like the bow, and it shoots well.

Question: In three weeks in May of 2012, you made $18,000 in tournament archery. What tournaments did you shoot?

Perkins: The first week in May I went to the Western Classic Trail Shoot in Redding, California. The tournament is often called the Redding Trail Shoot. I won the male pro division competing against more than 150 or 200 people. I made about $16,000 at that shoot. Then I shot the Gold Cup in New Jersey and placed first in that tournament, and that tournament paid about $2,000.

Question: Christopher, how long have you been shooting tournament archery?

Perkins: About 9 years, but I didn’t start out to be a tournament archery shooter. My dad was a bowhunter, and he bought me a bow. I started shooting targets, so that I could get ready to go bowhunting when I was old enough. My dad heard of some 3D archery tournaments that were being conducted in our area, and he took me to the shoots. When I learned that there was a target aspect of shooting the bow, I tried that type of competition and really liked it.

PSE's 2012 Dominator Pro

PSE’s 2012 Dominator Pro

Question: What do you like about shooting target archery?

Perkins: I get to travel and meet a lot of new people – even from different countries. Archery is a very friendly sport, when you’re on the line competing, and when you come off the line to talk with the other archers you meet at a tournament. And, shooting archery is fun for me.

Question: Okay, the first tournament you won money in this year was the Redding tournament. What kind of tournament is that?

Perkins: This tournament is an NFAA Marked 3D championship. 3D targets are set up at different distances at known distances. For instance, when you go up to the line, they’ll tell you the target is at 35 yards, but you don’t know the yardage cut or how you have to estimate aiming, because the targets are set on an incline or a decline. So, even though you know the distance to the target, you don’t know how much the angle of the target increases or decreases or how you have to sight in on that target. Each target has an orange dot on it. If you center the dot with your arrow, you get 11 points. Each one of the targets is set up at a different yardage, and you are permitted to use a range finder. Some of the range finders will calculate the cut for you. The one I was using gave me the cut.

Question: What range finder were you using?

Perkins: I was using a Leupold RX 1000 with DNA (Digitally eNhanced Accuracy). This range finder belonged to one of my buddies. I didn’t really have a rangefinder that I felt comfortable going to this tournament with, so I asked my buddy if I could borrow his. I liked this range finder so much that after the tournament I bought one. It costs about $400 or $500. This was my first time to ever go to Redding, so I wanted to go with a very reliable range finder. I wanted a range finder that would calculate the true distance to the target, whether it was uphill or downhill. I don’t know how it works. I guess it has some kind of ballistic table, but I found that this range finder was dead on. Whatever it determined the range was, that’s what I dialed in my sights to shoot. We shot 70 targets during the weekend, and I only missed 7 dots.

Tomorrow: Why PSE’s Christopher Perkins Decided to Shoot the Western Classic Trail Shoot in Redding This Year

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Keith Hubbard Got his Bear in Southern Arizona


PSE's Keith Hubbard

PSE’s Keith Hubbard

 

With record high temps this past weekend…my honey hole paid off again. In a 24 hour period, I had 5 bears come in. The first afternoon yielded a large sow and cub. On the second day, I was about to climb into my tree stand when I heard a noise. I looked up the hill and saw this bear coming in, so I detached my safety harness, untied my bow and waited for her to enter the water. As she walked in, I sneaked over to within 15 yards, after spending 1 minute or so in the water she began to turn around so I drew. When she stopped, she was facing me, but a few seconds later she turned enough to give me a quartering shot. The arrow entered the shoulder and exited the opposite rear quarter; she ran about 70 yards and piled up. I can’t get over how fast the Omen Pro is at 70 #’s. It left a serious path of destruction. While I was taking photos and skinning her, I had two other bears walk in on me. What a great day to be on a sky island.

Keith Hubbard, PSE Gorilla Squad


2012 PSE Stinger 3G vs Brute X – Q & A with PSE’s Bobby V


PSE’s Bobby V compares the 2012 PSE Stinger 3G versus the 2012 PSE Brute X. To see how other’s compare the bows, go to our Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/OfficialPSEArchery.


Q & A with PSE’s Bobby V – How often should I upgrade my bow?


PSE’s Bobby Vargas answers Bradley Caro’s question of how often you should upgrade your bow. To see other’s opinions on the question, go to our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/OfficialPSEArchery.


The PSE Rally: The Most Adjustable Bow in the Marketplace


2012 PSE Rally

2012 PSE Rally

Editor’s Note: Would you like great new features at no extra cost? PSE is constantly looking for ways to make their bows better fit their customer’s needs. In the 2012 new product line for PSE, you’ll see more adjustability, better fit and many more technical bows. The bows are easier to shoot and produce better performance for all archers. To get the best information, we’ve talked with Blake Shelby, the Public Relations and Marketing Director for PSE Bows, who says that, “PSE bow designers are the most unsatisfied engineers in the world, because they always believe they can make bows better.”

Shelby: We listen to our customers, especially the dealers at the bow shops. Our question to them was, “What can we do to help you the most?” Their answer was, “Give us one bow that we can adjust to fit any shooter.” As you know, the fit of a bow has major bearing on accuracy and also on comfort, grip and shootability of the bow. The PSE engineers wanted to give the dealers what they wanted, a bow that was easy to adjust to any shooter. That bow is the new Rally. The Rally is the most adjustable bow that PSE ever has made. Our small youth bows have great adjustability, but we’ve now produced this full adult size adjustable bow. The Rally has good speed at 308 fps, it has a 7 ½    inch brace height, and it’s 33 ¾ inches long. One main feature of the Rally is its 12 inches of draw length adjustment. This bow can go from 18 to 31 inches of draw length. You also can change the amount of weight that you pull by simply loosening the cables in the cam. So, if you buy a 50 pound model, you can get it down to 15 pounds of pull weight. If you buy a 60 pound model, you can get it down to 18 pounds of draw weight. And, if you buy a 70 pound model, you can get the bow down to 20 pounds of draw weight.

Your first question may be, “Why produce a bow with so much adjustability?” Well, here are some of the reasons:

  •  We know that most bowhunters don’t start shooting their bows until bow season’s almost arrived. As they continue shooting, they get stronger and stronger the more they practice. In the early days of practice, they need a lightweight bow to develop and build their muscles. By the time hunting season comes in, they’re often ready to shoot heavier weights. We’ve found that when archers start shooting a lot in preparation for hunting season or for tournament archery, they often want to increase the weight of their bows by as much as 15 to 20 pounds as their muscles get stronger, and they desire more speed. They can take the Rally and start at a very low poundage (half the weight of the bow) and then begin to add pounds to the bow as they become stronger.
  •  Another factor that makes this bow great is that many bowhunters have children who need to start off shooting with light poundage. With this bow, the youngster can start shooting at 20 pounds, and as he or she gets stronger, move up in weight to a weight that’s comfortable to him as he grows.
  •  A bowhunter who buys a Rally, as he moves up in weight and wants more features, can pass the Rally down to his children, and then step up to a more expensive bow himself.
  •  An older hunter who’s been shooting a heavy poundage bow can stay in the industry much longer if he or she purchases a Rally and turns the weight of the bow down to the weight that’s comfortable to him.
  •  The Rally doesn’t have a specific weight, because it’s so adjustable and will fit almost any shooter. The re sale value on the Rally will stay very high, since this bow can be adjusted to fit almost any hunter.

We’ve given our dealers and customers what they’ve wanted: the most adjustable bow in the marketplace for a very price conscious consumer. The Rally is priced at $299. For this reason, an entry level bowhunter or a tournament archer can get into the sport of bowhunting or tournament archery at a very reasonable price, with a bow that will grow with him or her and the family. With a conventional bow that only has 6 to 10 pounds of weight adjustment, there isn’t much adjustment a shooter can make. The Rally gives the shooter almost double the weight adjustment in the same bow. One of the things I do is that when I get new bows, I pass my old bows on to other people who want to get into bowhunting. These people may be family, friends or just an individual who needs a bow and doesn’t have one. But when you pass the bow on, the bow really needs to fit the person that you’re giving it to, and the Rally can be adjusted to fit almost anyone.

One big advantage for the retailers is that now they don’t have to sell a wide variety of introductory bows. They now will have a bow to fit any customer who may come into the shop and is interested in beginning to shoot archery. The Rally will adjust to almost any body who walks into a bow shop, at any time of the year.

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Ladies, Here Comes the PSE Stiletto Bow


2012 PSE Stiletto

2012 PSE Stiletto

Editor’s Note: Would you like great new features at no extra cost? PSE is constantly looking for ways to make their bows better fit their customer’s needs. In the 2012 new product line for PSE, you’ll see more adjustability, better fit and many more technical bows. The bows are easier to shoot and produce better performance for all archers. To get the best information, we’ve talked with Blake Shelby, the Public Relations and Marketing Director for PSE Bows, who says that, “PSE bow designers are the most unsatisfied engineers in the world, because they always believe they can make bows better.”

Question: We’ve seen a growing demand for bows for female archers. What’s PSE creating?

Shelby: If you really want to be a lady with all the glam and glitz of style and function coming from the fashion industry, you know that stiletto high heels deliver the height and beauty for which many high fashion ladies are looking. Therefore when PSE took on the challenge of designing a bow strictly for women archers, the word Stiletto fit perfectly. The ladies have told us they don’t want a second class bow. They want all the features of the X-Force technology built into a bow that’s been designed specifically for them – a challenge for the PSE bow engineers.

The first consideration has been draw length. Most female archers have a shorter draw length than their male counterparts. Also, generally they prefer to pull lighter poundage than male archers, but don’t want to give up speed in their bows. We’ve designed the new mini EVO hybrid cam for the ladies, and put it in an X-Force format, which gives the ladies a very fast and smooth bow designed specifically for female archers. The Stiletto bow has many of the same features as the EVO, but its cam is smaller than the EVO cam. It fits shorter draw lengths, from 22 ½ to 27 inches but still gives the speed and performance women archers want and need with shorter draw lengths and lighter poundage. The Stiletto bow allows women to punch out those big game animals when they go hunting. At 27 inches draw length, the bow can produce speeds of 308 fps. Never has there been a bow built in this draw length range that can deliver that much speed. Now, just like the changes and the options that we’ve given the EVO shooters, we want to deliver those same options for the ladies who use the Stiletto. The bow is built in three different weights of 40, 50  and 60 pound models. Now the ladies don’t have to worry about fighting the bow to get it back to full draw. If they want to step up to the heavier bow, we have the bows to allow them to move all the way up to 60 pounds.

Many companies have come out with what they call “a women’s bow,” and truly the bow is actually a youth bow with a different paint job and graphics. But that’s not what PSE has done with the Stiletto. We’ve strictly engineered and designed this bow for women archers. We want to give women the speed and performance, weight and draw length that’s designed specifically for them. Most women don’t want to pull 70 pounds or have a 30 inch draw length, so we’ve designed the Stiletto to fit their needs. Most of the innovations of the Stiletto have been recommended by the female members of our hunting staff, Julie Kreuter and Tammy Gregory. We’ve also had input from our ladies who shoot 3D archery. These women and others who hunt have been asking for this bow and have had input on what it should be and how it should be built. We kept hearing more from a growing number of ladies asking, “Why doesn’t PSE build a bow specifically for us?” So, we asked, “What features does the bow need to have, to make it a women’s bow?” As they started to answer these questions, we began to build the features into the new Stiletto from PSE. The bottom line on the Stiletto is that, the women asked for it, and now we’ve delivered their bow.

Tomorrow: The PSE Rally: The Most Adjustable Bow in the Marketplace

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


The All New 2012 PSE Vendetta Bow


2012 PSE Vendetta

2012 PSE Vendetta

Editor’s Note: Would you like great new features at no extra cost? PSE is constantly looking for ways to make their bows better fit their customer’s needs. In the 2012 new product line for PSE, you’ll see more adjustability, better fit and many more technical bows. The bows are easier to shoot and produce better performance for all archers. To get the best information, we’ve talked with Blake Shelby, the Public Relations and Marketing Director for PSE Bows, who says that, “PSE bow designers are the most unsatisfied engineers in the world, because they always believe they can make bows better.”

Question: Blake, the Vendetta has been an extremely popular, less expensive bow from PSE. Have you made any changes in this line?

Shelby: The Vendetta is a rock star and has almost a cult following. In the past, we’ve offered a couple of different bows in our Vendetta line, but this year our engineers looked at the Vendetta and chose to completely redesign it. We’re introducing a new drive cam for the Vendetta bows. This cam is incredibly fast at 330 fps, and it’s one of the smoothest bows in our line, featuring a very smooth draw cycle. The Vendetta still has all of the speed you’ve come to expect from the Pro Series bows, but the new Vendetta is somewhat longer in length. At 34 inches axle to axle, it really feels great when you shoot it. The Vendetta is usually the bow a hunter gets when he first gets into archery or when he wants to step up from a lower priced bow with fewer features. When PSE came out with the Pro Series bows, the world of archery was forever changed. Now PSE wants to drastically improve the bow that has always been a great bow, to make it better at a lower price.

PSE’s motto has always been, “Deliver the most features and benefits for a price that bowhunters can pay, and give them the best shooting bows they can possibly have for the dollars they have to spend.” PSE bow designers are the most unsatisfied engineers in the world. They always believe that they can continue to make bows better. This reason is why PSE engineers want to continue improving classics like the Vendetta, just like they’ve improved the EVO. They want Vendetta shooters to be able to take advantage of all the new technology that’s coming to the forefront of the archery industry and get that technology in bows they can appreciate.

Tomorrow: Ladies, Here Comes the PSE Stiletto Bow

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE Creates Three EVOs for 2012, But Keeps the 2011 Price Intact


2012 PSE Dream Season EVO

2012 PSE Dream Season EVO

Editor’s Note: Would you like great new features at no extra cost? PSE is constantly looking for ways to make their bows better fit their customer’s needs. In the 2012 new product line for PSE, you’ll see more adjustability, better fit and many more technical bows. The bows are easier to shoot and produce better performance for all archers. To get the best information, we’ve talked with Blake Shelby, the Public Relations and Marketing Director for PSE Bows, who says that, “PSE bow designers are the most unsatisfied engineers in the world, because they always believe they can make bows better.”

Question: What’s the next bow you’re excited about, Blake? And what makes it special and different for 2012?

Shelby: With the success of the EVO last year, we really worked hard to give it more options. So this year, for the shooters who liked a little more forgiveness and a longer brace height, we came out with a 7 inch brace height EVO called the EVO 7. We built a bow that delivers 335 fps with all of the exact same features as the 2012 Dream Season EVO but has a 7 inch brace height.

2012 PSE EVO SD

2012 PSE EVO SD

To make more bows to fit more hunters, we also created a bow with a shorter brace height than the standard 2012 Dream Season EVO, called the EVO SD. This bow is designed for archers all the way down to a 24 ½ inch draw length and fits archers from 24 ½ to 28 ½ inch draw lengths. With the addition of these two bows to the EVO line, once again we’re developing bows that fit more shooters, rather than trying to make the shooters fit the bows. Now everyone can shoot an EVO, whether he or she wants the standard, the 7 inch or the EVO SD. You get all of these new features in the 2012 model, to fit almost every archer, regardless of draw length.

2012 PSE EVO 7

2012 PSE EVO 7

Another feature to appreciate is that all three of the new EVOs will sell for the same price as the EVO did in 2011. The EVO 7 has a 31 inch draw length, while the standard EVO has a 30 inch draw length, and the EVO SD goes all the way down to a 24 ½ inch draw length. We feel that introducing these three bows will serve all of our customers better with the best of PSE engineering, at the same price as last year. All three of these bows have the same cam system and same performance but feature the ability to get a bow that fits you in adjustability. When you’re looking at and comparing bows, you want to pick the bow that fits you the best and delivers the performance you’ve come to expect from PSE Archery.

Tomorrow: The All New 2012 PSE Vendetta Bow

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


The New 2012 PSE Dream Season EVO


2012 PSE Dream Season EVO

2012 PSE Dream Season EVO

Editor’s Note: Would you like great new features at no extra cost? PSE is constantly looking for ways to make their bows better fit their customer’s needs. In the 2012 new product line for PSE, you’ll see more adjustability, better fit and many more technical bows. The bows are easier to shoot and produce better performance for all archers. To get the best information, we’ve talked with Blake Shelby, the Public Relations and Marketing Director for PSE Bows, who says that, “PSE bow designers are the most unsatisfied engineers in the world, because they always believe they can make bows better.”

Question: The Archery Trade Association (ATA) held its annual show for new products on January 10th through 12th in Columbus, Ohio. PSE Archery was there showing its new line of equipment for 2012. Blake, what was PSE’s number one flagship bow this year at the ATA Show, and why?

Shelby: This year, we introduced the new and improved 2012 Dream Season EVO in X-Force line. The EVO was introduced in 2011 and set the world of archery on fire. We couldn’t produce enough EVOs to meet the demand of all the archers wanting them across the nation. The EVO is the smoothest drawing bow in the X-Force line. At 345 fps, the EVO has incredible speed. But one of the reasons that so many people began to demand the EVO is because of its smooth draw cycle. We make bows that are faster, like the Omen Pro. But the bowhunting community also has demanded the speed, the performance and the draw cycle that the EVO delivers.

The EVO was so successful last year, that this year, we’ve decided to optimize the bow. We’ve improved the cams and reduced vibrations to give the bow a better feel. One of the biggest improvements we’ve made to the EVO is a new cam system. Now, you can get draw lengths within ½ inch, with a total of 6 possible inches in draw length adjustment, without a module change. In the past, if you were shooting 26 ½ inch draw lengths, you had to settle for either a 26 or a 27 inch draw length. This ½ inch increment difference wasn’t too bad, but you couldn’t make the bow fit you perfectly, unless you changed the module. Now, without having to change any parts of the bow, you can get the ½ inch adjustments you may need. The new bow also has a stainless steel locking pin that locks the inner cam into place, so there’s no possibility of slipping. Tournament archers and bowhunters love and ask for precision and adjustability in their bows. That ½ inch really can make a big difference in how comfortably an archer shoots. The more customized you can make a bow (especially a performance bow like the EVO), the better bow you have. In the past, archers using precision bows have been somewhat limited to specific draw lengths, including a module change at every draw length. But now that the EVO has an inner cam, changing the draw length is much easier.

The new EVO also comes with 30% longer limb pockets, and a new limb system that works within these pockets. The new limbs are our fourth generation of X-Force limbs. The new EVO has 20% more bend, so that you have less reflex in the riser. Any time you have a straighter riser, the more accuracy you can get out of your bow.

What’s great is that PSE is delivering all these new features on the EVO to our customers without increasing the price of the bow. The new PSE Dream Season EVO in the X-Force line is probably one of the lowest priced high end bows on the archery market. In this tough economy, we’ve deliberately set out to increase performance, but not the price, so the 2012 EVO will be the same price as last year’s model. Another great advantage of the EVO is that it will hold its price well compared to other bows, if you decide to trade it in or sell it when you step up to the next generation of PSE bows. We’re really excited about what PSE has been able to do to deliver the features our customers have requested without increasing prices.

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.

Tomorrow: PSE Creates Three EVOs for 2012, But Keeps the 2011 Price Intact


New PSE Product Accessories for 2012


Dual-X Quiver 5-Arrow

High Tech Quiver for High Tech Broadheads and Arrows

We know that after the PSE engineers develop a new bow or improve one of our best bows like the Vendetta, they don’t just sit on their hands the rest of the year. Our engineers spend time improving the accessories that PSE offers to meet the changing demand of the more technical target archers and bow hunters. One accessory that the archery community has been excited about is the new X Quiver.

Not only is the X Quiver incredibly reasonably priced, but it also has many new features this year that bow hunters have been asking for. The X Quiver has a really nice on/off mechanism, and it works on retention, so that you just pop it into place. Last year, the X Quiver featured a standard hood that shooters had to force broadheads up into. This year, PSE introduced a foam free, expandable broadhead specific hood that has two sets of arrow grabbers. Because we’ve removed the foam from the hood, when you put expandable broadheads into the quiver, the expandable blades aren’t deployed. With this design, you no longer have broadheads sticking into foam in the top of the hood. As broadhead technology has developed, more engineering has gone into developing expandable broadheads that deploy more efficiently and help create better air flight. The price on the new quiver is around $100 to $114. These broadheads are very easy to put on and take off, and they look fantastic on the bow. Although the new X Quiver is specifically designed for expandable broadheads, it’s still a very effective quiver for the fixed head broadheads.

The X Quiver is a one piece quiver that allows the broadhead hunter to take the quiver off the bow and hang it in the tree when hunting, and then reattach the quiver to the bow whenever they’re ready to leave the woods. Not only have we seen expandable broadheads getting better and better, we’ve also observed that the majority of bow hunters are shooting expandable broadheads because they’ve become much more durable than in years past. As a general rule, expandable broadheads produce a much larger cutting diameter than the expandable broadheads of the past. As bows have grown faster (especially in the X-Force Line), using fixed broadheads on these faster bows has proven more difficult than in the past, when we were shooting lower speed bows.

Today, we’re seeing more archers shooting high performance bows and expandable broadheads. These archers require a different type of quiver to support these broadheads than the traditional quiver. For this reason, the engineers at PSE developed the new X Quiver. The X Quiver meets the demand of these high performance shooters and their expandable broadheads. The new set of holders in the X Quiver helps to ensure that the quiver and the arrows in the quiver are extremely quiet when being transported.

PSE Eclipse Micro

A Better Sight for Better Shooters, the PSE Eclipse Micro

Last year, PSE introduced the new sights of the X-Force bows. PSE wanted a high end sight that was very strong and carried all the features that bowhunters want when they go to the woods. There’re a variety of new sights for the X-Force bows, but my favorite is the Eclipse Micro sight. This is a heavy duty, well-built sight, and the main feature of the sight is that it’s one piece machined. There’s very little slack (wiggle room) in the sight. One of the biggest differences between low cost sights and higher priced sights is the precision with which the sight is made, not only the features on the sight.

Any archery company can put a lot of features on a sight, but the real quality in the sight is determined when you loosen the arrow. Does the sight want to fall off of the bow or is it machined very well so that there’re slight tolerances? The PSE Eclipse Micro sight is held to very strong tolerances and detail when the sights are made. Plus it has all of the features that bowhunters want. The Eclipse Micro has an incredible new micro adjustable bubble on it to make sure your alignment is correct before you release the arrow. It also accepts lenses in case you want to put a target lens on the sight for magnification. The Eclipse Micro has micro adjustments for fiber optics and it also includes a light which is a great feature for shooting in low light conditions in states where using a lighted sight is legal.

The Eclipse Micro sight was designed to be tough enough to handle hard conditions, while still including all the features bowhunters want in a high end sight. The sight retails for around $179.99, comes with 5 pins, and the archer can add additional pins if they need them. Take a hard look this season at the Eclipse Micro. You’ll be glad you did, and once you mount it on your bow, you’ll really be able to see why this sight is my personal favorite.

Carbon Force Arrows

Carbon Force Bow Madness Arrows

Along with better bows, better quivers, and better sights, PSE has now designed a better arrow. When PSE came out with the Carbon Force Arrows, with Radial X Weave technology, the bow hunting world embraced this technology and raced to get the new arrows. These arrows are true wrap carbon fiber. Wrapping the arrow in carbon fiber does amazing things to the performance of the arrow. A truly wrapped arrow does not have a spine or a high spot on it. A seam can cause inconsistent arrow flight if you don’t have the arrow lined up perfectly on the bow each time you shoot. But because a wrapped carbon fiber arrow has no seam, you not only have much more consistency, but you have much more strength in the arrow. PSE’s Carbon Force arrows aren’t nearly as susceptible to side impact as other arrows, and the arrow is much more durable.

After introducing the technology in the Carbon Force arrow, the next step up is the Bow Madness arrow, which features the Radial X Weave technology. The Bow Madness arrow is an affordable, feature packed arrow that has incredible graphics and also comes with a Fusion Three Vein on the arrow. These are 3 inch veins that give you an incredible amount of stability. These veins are created by fusing a softer plastic on the bottom of the vein, which allows outstanding adhesion to the arrow shaft with a stiffer plastic on the top of the vein, producing really good flight control. These arrows are .003 straightness out and are matched with 5 grains per dozen, and retail for $99 per dozen. Bow Madness arrows are a great value for an arrow of this quality, and they were designed to shoot outstandingly in the new PSE bows.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bow and bowhunting accessories, click here.


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