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PSE’s Emily Anderson Prepares Hunting Camp Meals


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

PSE's Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson

In my last post, I talked about preparing your body and gear prior to a hunt. In this post I’d like to talk a little bit about food. Who doesn’t like to talk about food, right?One of the last things I do prior to a hunt is prepare all the food for the trip. I like to do as much food prep ahead of time which makes meal time upon returning to base camp after a hunt easy. I don’t want to be fussing with putting something together after I’ve come back from a long hike, it’s dark and I’m tired. Therefore, I do a lot of thinking and planning ahead of time to make sure that my meals are ready to go and all I need to do is heat them up. I usually prepare them a couple days prior to our hunt and then freeze them solid so they are good to pull out of the cooler whenever we want a meal during our hunting week. (Hint: Use a disposable casserole pan so there are no dishes to be done either)

Here are some meal ideas that I return to year after year because they are non-fuss, plus my hunting friends threaten to harm me if I don’t show up at camp with…

ELK LASAGNA
Cook lasagna noodles (el dente)
Prepare sauce – brown 1 lb. ground meat (elk or whatever game meat is in your freezer). Sauté in with the meat, two minced cloves of garlic. Add one can tomato sauce and one can diced tomatoes. Add 1-2 tablespoons of oregano or Italian seasoning. Cover and let simmer for 20 minutes.
Build lasagna – butter the bottom of the pan, and then layer with noodles, then mozzarella cheese, cottage cheese, meat sauce and parmesan cheese. Continue with layers, ending with meat and parmesan cheese until pan is full. Cover with tin foil and freeze.

CHICKEN ENCHILADAS
Cook several chicken breasts, shred and mix in taco seasoning. Prepare a box or two of Spanish rice. Butter the bottom of a 9×13 disposable pan. Build enchiladas with the following ingredients… Black beans, taco chicken, cheese, rice, Pico de Gallo sauce. Roll each enchilada tightly. (I usually fit 6-8 in a pan depending on how big I make them). Cover the top of the enchiladas with a can of cream of chicken soup (Helps to keep them from drying out), and a layer of shredded cheese. Cover and freeze.

PSE's Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Camp Fire

Both of these meals can be heated up either on a grill or oven in a camper (if you have one).

I have lots more hunting meal ideas, so stay tuned for future posts!

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Back up Bow by Pedro Ampuero


By Pedro Ampuero
AdventurousBowhunter.com

Pedro Ampuero

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero Back Up Bow

We all travel a lot of miles to get to our hunting areas, sometimes by car, train or plane. The hunt is only a few days and all the equipment must work perfect.

To avoid any problem in the hunts, the most important thing is to take care of the bow and bring it in all hunts in the best conditions as possible. Try to have a reliable bow and accessories, you don’t want a sight getting loose, or bow strings stretching with temperature changes. Always take equipment you are confident with, and that you have tested before, hunts are not for trying new things.

Although you do your best to have all your equipment perfect, things always happen in the most unwanted moment, and we can have hundred kinds of things going wrong in the bow. My bow fell down a tree and broke a limb with one of my steel tree steps. I had to throw my bow down the mountain to save my life on a steep area hunting for ibex. All the brush from the Cameroon rain forest moved my peep sight. I have broke sights, rests, releases… Lot of things!

Pedro Ampuero

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero Hunting Gear

Years ago I use to take all the required equipment to solve any problem on my bow I could have. I had a portable bow press and was ready to change strings and cables, also brought spare sights, rests, etc.. This could save your hunt! Although it took a lot of time to solve a major problem on your bow, and all that time you could be hunting. Apart from that, is hard to get the bow as good as you would like. You need to sight again your sight, adjust the rest, etc.. When you are in the middle of the mountains it is hard to do things properly.

For all these reason, I am taking always with me in all my hunts a back up bow. The backup bow is exactly the same rig as the hunting bow, that way I have also a spare part of anything, from sight, rest, bolts,.. At the same time, I am using the exactly same arrows for both, which save extra space. This bow is perfectly set, and I could change one bow with the other and be hunting without even notice. I can distinguish them because they are different camo, that’s it.
What do you do, bring a back up bow or the equipment necessary to solve any problem?

Good luck in the mountains, be safe,
Pedro Ampuero

Pedro is a mechanical engineer by trade and a bowhunter by heart. He is the co-founder of the blog AdventurousBowhunter.com and Cazandoconarco.es and has written many articles for the hunting industry and currently collaborates with the most prestigious companies on the industry.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Preparing for a Southern California Hunt


By Albert Quackenbush
Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Glassing is a key to SoCal hunting Success

From grammar school through college I was a doodler. On every sheet of paper or napkin you’d find some sort of doodle showing what I was thinking about that day. Nowadays, doodles can be found in the way of biologist phone numbers, road names, and illustrations of what I have seen in certain areas. Similar to that, when I plan for a Southern California hunt, I am constantly taking notes in many different forms. Planning for a hunt out here is very much like school – you have to do your homework to be successful. I get emails and blog questions asking me where to go and how to find animals to hunt, but that’s just the surface work.

The number one question I get asked is how do I find a place to hunt in Southern California? Homework and a positive attitude are two things you must do and have to hunt the areas here. You also have to have the courage to hike to new locations, glass and burn boot rubber. If driving is a factor in your decision, keep this in mind; most areas to hunt are anywhere from a half hour drive to a 3 hour drive – one way! There are many factors that I have to consider when planning for a hunt. I will share some of them here.

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Utilizing Maps

Maps and Boundaries
Maps can be a hunter’s best friend, so I scour maps all year; online and paper topos. My hunt preparation, no matter where I am going always includes maps. I usually start reviewing area in Google Earth because it’s easy to mark locations, east to share with your hunting buddies, and it’s free. I like topographic maps because I can review the terrain and more importantly locate water sources. Whether it’s a map printed off the internet or a topo, I always have a map of the location I am going with places highlighted to check out.

Forums and Other Hunters
Online forums and other hunters are a great source of information. Most hunters like to brag a little when it comes to finding a good spot, or animal, to hunt. When I first started out hunting in SoCal this is exactly what I did. I gathered as much Intel online that I could. I processed it, asked questions and verified that the areas where I wanted to scout were public land, legal to hunt and had a chance for finding animals. This is also a great way to meet other hunters who are looking for hunting partners or have land they are willing to allow you to hunt. Now don’t get your hopes up there, but it IS possible. With some browsing, phone calls and asking questions you CAN find private land to hunt that won’t cost you anything but a tank of gas to get there and back. It just takes perseverance and some work.\Trail Cameras and Scouting

 

PSE's Albert Quackenbush Utilizing Maps

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Trail Camera

An often daunting task is to find the deer on public land. Trail cameras and scouting are the very best ways of finding a shooter deer. The logical thing is to combine the two. Bring a trail camera or two when you go scouting and if you plan to set up some trail cams bring out your optics and glass. One of the challenges here is that your cameras will mostly be going on public land. Putting your cameras on public land will give you some great information, but the cameras seem to be a big target for thieves. Use common sense and don’t put them in easy to find places. Take the time to hide it, lock it up and take it down when you have the information you need.

Check Over Your Gear
Often overlooked is the shape of your gear, namely your bow, arrows, release and any electronics. I can tell you that having your gear fail on you will make your heart sink. I have had the misfortune of having a release seize up due to the dry, sandy conditions of the high desert and I have had my trigger fall right of my release while hunting. Fortunately, I have a backup release with me at all times, but that isn’t always true with a bow. I don’t always take a backup bow with me, so it’s a priority to go over it carefully and make sure it’s lubed, string is waxed, screws are tightened, and everything is in place.

Packing In and Packing Out
Lists can be a downfall for some people, but I thrive on making lists and planning. I like to be sure I have everything I am going to need for a hunt and that I haven’t left anything behind. I have been on a few hunts out here now and don’t make a list every time I go, but I have a good idea of what I will need. A few nights before a planned hunt, I will lay everything out and make certain it’s in the right place. It could be in my pack or in a tote to go in the truck, but it’s there. If I have to purchase something at the store I will know it long before the day of the hunt. Don’t wait until the last minute and realize you forgot an important piece of the puzzle.

Setting a Safety Net
An important feature I have added to my hunts is a safety net. Not a safety net in the literal sense, but I a plan in case something goes wrong or if someone needs to find me. I start by making sure to give my wife has a map of the area I am hunting. On that map I mark up the roads or trailheads we’ll be parking at and where we plan on hunting. I give here the directions I am taking to get there. If I am going hunting with my hunting partners, I am sure to give her their names, cell phones and email addresses should she not hear from me. I also give her times I will be going in and coming out. One feature that I must add to my plan is the local hospitals and their phone numbers. Hopefully she’ll never need to call, but in case she does it’ll be readily available.

PSE's Albert Quackenbush Utilizing Maps

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Six miles off the main road

There are many different ways to plan a hunt in Southern California. Every person has a certain approach to the way they plan out a hunt and each time may be slightly different. Even mine gets adjusted from time to time. It all depends on the person and the hunt itself. No matter what, have fun in the preparation and planning. The anticipation that builds through the planning of a hunt can be almost as good as the hunt itself. Almost.

Albert Quackenbush has been bowhunting for more than 28 years. He shares his adventures on his blog, SoCalBowhunter.com, and also writes for Bow Adventures e-magazine. He is a Pro Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com, Piranha Custom Bowstrings and Field Logic. He is a member of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, California Deer Association, and is a Life Member of the North American Hunting Club.

Albert was born and raised in New York State where he learned to hunt everything from squirrels to whitetail deer. He currently resides in Southern California with his wife and daughter and hunts year round.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Dustin Jones What to take with you on a Hunt.


By Dustin Jones
http://www.highcountrybowhunter.com/

Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones Adjusting Sight

There are so many different situations and different types of hunts that will require you to pack different things. With that being said, there are some things that I always pack with me regardless if it is just a morning hunt or a 5 day backcountry hunt; things that I feel are important to pack with me.

PSE's Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones Hydration Bladder & Filter

The first one that I always pack is water. No matter what type of hunting I am doing, I try to make sure I have plenty of drinking water. Shorter trips are easier to pack water for but for those longer trips I make sure to have a water filtration system with me. The water bladder I use has an inline water filter which allows me to fill it with stream water and ensures I have clean drinking water whenever.

I always take my camera with me as well. I don’t pack a bulky DSLR camera but a high quality compact camera can be found in my pack. Once you arrow that animal of a lifetime you’ll want to snap some great photos of the animal in the field. Also I enjoy taking pictures of the scenery. One of the best things about hunting is seeing nature at its finest. Enjoying those moments and being able to share them with family and friends or just hold onto them for you yourself is why I carry a camera with me.

Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones Bow Tool

Probably one of the most important things I have in my pack is a multi-tool to work on my bow. I carry it because you never know what can happen while you are out there. You may find a screw has come loose, or you notice something is off just enough to throw you off and you need to fix it. Packing a multi-tool will help save you from ending a hunt early.

Also knowing that whatever can happen may happen while hunting; I am sure to have a first aid kit. I’m not talking about a large, bulky kit that takes a lot of space but something small that has Band-Aids, gauze, tweezers, tape, and medications for pain as well as allergies. I personally pack duct tape because it has multiple uses and sticks very well to just about anything.

Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones Using Hydration Bladder To Cook

A GPS unit is helpful for either style of hunting. Whether it is a short morning hunt or a 5 day trip, the GPS can help you in multiple ways. You will be able to navigate your way around so you don’t get lost but also with a GPS you will be able to mark certain spots so you can return to them later on which is extremely helpful when tracking an animal. A lot of times while I’m out hunting I stumble upon a water hole or some new bedding areas that look very well used and promising that I would like to come back to. By marking them I will be able to return to them later on to give them a try.

These are some of the necessities that I pack with me on all of my hunts which I have found to be very useful. I don’t want to weigh my pack down on either type of hunt but I find these to be some of the most common things I pack with me.

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.

Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Will Jenkins – Where to place your trail cams


By Will Jenkins
http://www.thewilltohunt.com/

Move Your Cameras!
If you’re a deer hunter and you have a trail camera, you need to go put them over a scrape. Scrapes are popping up everywhere and being visited by bucks every night and soon during the day. Rubs are starting to show up as well as bucks are starting to get even more fired up for the rut.

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins Camera

Putting a trail camera over a scrape can do a lot in the way of helping you understand the buck activity on your property. As you can see from the pictures and video in this post all of the activity shown was within one week over one scrape! At one point I had 4 bucks hit the same scrape in one night. While you can’t hunt at night you can gain a lot of knowledge about those bucks and their habits. Simply by focusing on which direction the bucks tend to come from and considering the terrain in that direction you can get a good idea of where that deer is bedding during the day, feeding at night and what his main travel routes are.

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins Move Camera

All of these are key bits of information that can help you tag a great buck this season. If you don’t have a trail camera go get one, even a cheap one, and set it up over a scrape. Monitoring the deer activity in your area when you aren’t hunting can be really exciting and rewarding.

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins Trail Camera

Will Jenkins is creator of TheWilltoHunt.com and Harnesses For Hunters. He’s an avid outdoorsman who enjoys sharing his experiences through his blog. He also writes for Bow Adventures e-Magazine and is a member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association.

Will lives in Central Virginia with his wife and two kids. He hunts in Virginia and Maryland but has dreams of heading west to hunt Elk and Mule Deer.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Jared Bloomgren Favorite Places to Hunt


By Jared Bloomgren

Jared Bloomgren

PSE’s Jared Bloomgren Above 10,000 Ft.

I have been “blessed” to hunt numerous places over the years that range quite a bit in terrain. The arid dryness of the desert overseas, to the flat or rolling hills and open terrain of the prairie, to the dry, rugged badlands, to the rough, rugged, high elevation and unforgiving terrain of the mountains. I think three of the four are perfect, especially the farther I get away from the road hunters and trail systems. The hunting will just get better for me the farther I press on but often times harder as well but will always make it more rewarding in the end.

Jared Bloomgren

PSE’s Jared Bloomgren Ridge 11,000 Ft.

So where is my most favorite place to hunt? That can be a hard choice depending on my mood and what I am hunting but I continually find myself drawn to the rough, rugged, high elevation and unforgiving terrain of the mountains. It makes my lungs burn, my legs ache, my head pound because of loss of oxygen and the added thin air, but most of all it makes me feel like a true do it yourself hunter. There are fewer crowds of hunters in these areas and far more less chances of hearing that four wheeler bombing close to your set-up. But with that being said there are also a heck of a lot more dangers from the unknown elements that could be dealt to you at any given time. The wildlife in this area often times could make you out for lunch if they wanted. Not much you could do about it if they decided to either! Hunting in the mountains many miles from any road or trail system can really make you realize how insignificant you really are on this planet. You really are not at the top of the food chain if you stop and think about it. Other things that are very appealing about the high country or back-country is how close you feel you are to the stars. If you have never been above 12,000 feet on a mountain in total darkness with no wind you wouldn’t realize that you can almost touch some of those stars! And the number of stars there are…..oooooh myyyyyyyyyy GOD! Absolutely beautiful!

Jared Bloomgren

Jared Bloomgren Glassing from my mountain top perch

I like to hunt in places where there is solitude, places that offer such views that are absolutely breathe taking. These areas are often not trekked upon by most hunters because of the strenuous work it takes to get there. Coming home 25 pounds lighter after a 2 week back-country hunt is one heck of a diet as well! Not because I was malnourished, but because I worked my butt off! It is hunts like this that are very rewarding. The harder I work on a hunt, the more rewarding it is! So bring on the mountains every time!

Jared “J-Rod” Bloomgren is a hardcore Do-It-Yourself bowhunter who strives to better himself each year in the outdoor community. As a professional hunter, freelance writer and photographer, he likes to relive his outdoor adventures through written expression and photography making the reader feel as if they were along on the hunt. He attributes much of his success to the vital education he has learned from the various big game animals that he hunts. He is quoted as saying, “In each and every hunt, success or defeat, I learn something from every outing and that I can put in my arsenal of knowledge to use at a later date, a later date that will again put my wits against that of my prey.”

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Dustin Jones How to Start out in Bowhunting


By Dustin Jones
HighCountryBowhunter.com

PSE's Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones- Evo

When you are just starting to get into bowhunting, it can be a little overwhelming. But the key is not to let that get the best of you. I have introduced several friends of mine into bowhunting and they have loved every minute of it.

The most obvious piece of equipment that you will need is a bow. The best thing you can do is find one that fits you and that you are comfortable shooting. When you are first starting out, there are great ready to shoot bow packages that include the bow, sight, quiver, and rest which helps relieve some of the stress about choosing the right set of accessories for your bow.

Once you have picked out a bow that is the time to start practicing. Get very familiar with your bow and practice often. The most important thing to remember about practicing is make sure you are putting in the effort when you do. Don’t just practice for the sake of practicing. When you shoot your bow, make sure you are consistent in your shooting motion to reduce making mistakes while hunting.

PSE's Dustin

PSE’s Dustin Jones Bow

The most important thing you should do is learn the regulations for the state that you are hunting. Know what paperwork must be done. Take your bowhunters education course to become familiar the rules. It is important to know the laws as well as understanding the unit boundaries. I know where I hunt here locally; in certain units I can only hunt whitetails while in others I can hunt both mule deer and whitetail. Later in the season on one side of the road you can hunt with a rifle while the other side of the road is archery only. So paying attention to the rules and regulations is very important to save you from having expensive fines and suspension of your hunting license.

Lastly, have fun. There will be a learning curve but go out there and just relax. You may not get an animal your first year out hunting, but enjoy the fact that you are out there hunting. As you are just getting started you will make mistakes, but as you continue practicing and getting out hunting you will learn how to minimize them. You will learn what works and what doesn’t work while hunting and having those close encounters and failed attempts. Who knows, maybe you’ll get out there for your first hunt and arrow a monster!

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.

Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Jared Bloomgren Advantages & Disadvantages of fixed or mechanical broadheads


By Jared Bloomgren

Jared Bloomgren Wac'em Triton

PSE’s Jared Bloomgren Wac’em Triton

Each and every year there are new and “improved” broadheads hitting the market that are supposed to be sharper, stronger, and more accurate than previous models. Many archers go through various broadhead brands and types almost like toilet paper in the neighborhood out-house after a chili feed! I am much different and have found a head that flat out gets it done for me and has numerous years now without letting me down. Of course it is a replaceable blade head and I choose to stick with this style of head for various reasons.

Which is better, fixed/replaceable blade or mechanical heads? This is a question that can get as heated as any political campaign out there when brought up at the wrong time at a pro shop or hunting camp. The argument will go on and on for decades to come I am sure. Or until exploding tips are legal to use…..who knows! Keep in mind that the following is merely opinion and facts based on my own trials with various heads in today’s market. This is a topic that will either earn me some fans or will turn some away. At any rate let’s get to it…..

Let’s look at advantages of both: Like stated previously, I prefer a replaceable blade head for many reasons. The advantages include but are not limited to: strength, replaceable blades to maintain a sharp cutting surface, better penetration, and more confidence in the equipment that I use. The advantages of a mechanical head are improved accuracy with field tip flight characteristics, less wind drag, many now have replaceable blades, bigger cutting diameter, and the sharp blades are often not exposed while not in use thus increasing safety.

Jared Bloomgren

PSE’s Jared Bloomgren Wac’em Triton XL

Now disadvantages: Replaceable or fixed blade heads often times will not fly as true as a field tip, the blades can cause the arrow to guide off path from a field tip. Mechanical heads have many more disadvantages. Keep in mind this is from my own trials and experiments! In my opinion a mechanical head will rob you of momentum and kinetic energy in order to get those blades to open. This is actually a fact, not just my opinion. Not a big deal to many considering they are way up in the numbers when it comes to KE and momentum. I also think that mechanical heads perform best when given the perfect scenario such as a perfect quartering shot. Why is that? Because no matter what mechanical head you look at on the market, it will cause an arrow to lose some energy when that arrow strikes a surface at an angle. The arrow does not want to continue in a straight line, it wants to kick to the side to open those blades. This causes a loss of energy. When I am shooting at an animal I want extreme confidence in my broadheads. Some states do not allow mechanical heads for elk. I want to use the same head for all my game!

Many believe that a replaceable or fixed blade head will never fly like a field tip. Well I would like to invite you over someday and I will shoot a field tip and any one of my broadheads side by side at yardages out to 120 yards or better to prove my point that it is indeed possible. With a well tuned bow and accessories and the correct spine arrow many (but not all) of this type of heads will fly like field tips. That is why I will always choose a replaceable or fixed blade any day over a mechanical.

To each their own. There are some very reliable mechanical heads on the market. At this time I am not 100% sold on them and will continue to shoot what I have most confidence in. My tried and true replaceable blade heads.

Jared “J-Rod” Bloomgren is a hardcore Do-It-Yourself bowhunter who strives to better himself each year in the outdoor community. As a professional hunter, freelance writer and photographer, he likes to relive his outdoor adventures through written expression and photography making the reader feel as if they were along on the hunt. He attributes much of his success to the vital education he has learned from the various big game animals that he hunts. He is quoted as saying, “In each and every hunt, success or defeat, I learn something from every outing and that I can put in my arsenal of knowledge to use at a later date, a later date that will again put my wits against that of my prey.”

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson Preparing For Your Hunt


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com

PSE's Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson on a Hunt

Prior to a hunt, there is always plenty of planning to do. While some are managing land, planting food plots and setting up tree stands, my hunts typically take place on public land in the mountains. Therefore, I can’t speak towards the former type of hunt preparation. However, I can tell you about the latter and how we plan for our hunts out west.

In my opinion, the first thing to do if planning a hunt in the mountains is to make sure you are physically prepared. While I don’t think it is absolutely necessary to be able to run marathons, but anything you do to increase your lung capacity and strength will definitely help, especially if you are not used to the altitude. Plus, ladies, it is always fun to be able to out hike the guys!

PSE's Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson Hunting Necessities

Second, make sure that you have all the gear needed. Start making lists! If you are planning a backcountry hunt where you pack in all your gear on your back or on horses, it is extremely important to make sure you have all you need. And then, pack your backpack ahead of time. However, if you are bringing a camper that changes things a bit. When hunting elk, we typically bring everything including the kitchen sink if we our hunting out of a camper… including the grill, which makes it nice for grilling fresh backstraps! I still carry around a backpack each day, even though we have camper for sleeping in each night. This allows us to easily stay out all day if necessary.

Here is a breakdown of what is included in my pack on elk hunts. I don’t think there is much difference for girls and guys in what is included, but you be the judge…

Backpack contents for day trips (usually elk hunting):
1. Heat packs
2. Snacks
3. Elk pee (scent wafers) & safety pin to hang on a tree
4. Extra layer of clothes – usually long johns and extra t-shirt for pack out trips
5. Matches
6. Game bag
7. Green cat eyes for walking out in the dark
8. Water
9. Toilet paper
10. Hunting license
11. Camera
NOTE: Since I wear cargo pants, a lot of my other supplies are safely tucked in all the pockets, which also makes things easy when getting ready for an early morning hunt. (Pockets contain: chapstick, range finder, elk calls, wind check and gloves)

Of course, there are a few obvious things missing, but they are safely tucked in my husband’s pack… knives, rope and gps

So…. do you have any special ritual or planning you do in advance of a hunt?

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


Break Your Silhouette For “Spot And Stalk”


By Pedro Ampuero
AdventurousBowhunter.com

Pedro Ampuero

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero Spot and Stalk

Almost all the hunting I make is “spot and stalk”, with roe deer even more often “Walk and Stalk” in which you walk through the forest until you spot the animal, which is typically almost at shooting distance. For being successful, is a must that you break your silhouette in order to detect the animals before they detect you.

For this purpose, one thing it has been much more effective for me, is to use macro pattern camos, which really break your silhouette at any distance. Sometimes with more classic camo patterns, which have a high detail level, they look great at close distances, but as soon as you get farther than 30 yards you cannot see the detail and it all looks like one brown piece.

Pedro Ampuero

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero Hunting

My philosophy is to focus more on not looking like a human, than trying to look like a tree. Animals relation the humans to some vertical lines which an average height etc.. Trying to break those lines is the key, specially the lines made by our shoulder and head. For this I use a ghillie hat, but I just leave it over my shoulders, to unify the shape of my head and shoulders. Using a typical cowboy hat is also a great way of breaking that shape.

Pedro Ampuero

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero Face Paint

The last important thing is to camo your lighter parts, like hands and face. Animals spot our white face as good as we spot the white parts of deer in the woods. We all know our life would be much harder if deer wouldn’t have white patches on the tail area. For that I typically use a facemask, or pain my face when the weather is warmer. I also use thin gloves for my hands, measuring, drawing the bow, glassing, etc.. All involves hand movement, and it is always easily detected by deer.

PSE's Pedro Ampuero

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero

It would be great to know your own experiences. Hope you find it of interest, and good luck all in the mountains!
Pedro Ampuero

Pedro is a mechanical engineer by trade and a bowhunter by heart. He is the co-founder of the blog AdventurousBowhunter.com and Cazandoconarco.es and has written many articles for the hunting industry and currently collaborates with the most prestigious companies on the industry.

 

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Albert Quackenbush -Baptism in Southern California


By Albert Quackenbush
http://socalbowhunter.blogspot.com/

Baptism in SoCal

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Baptism in SoCal

When I moved to California in 2006 I wasn’t sure what to expect. I had no friends here. I knew nothing at all about the hunting here and I was afraid. I’ll be the first to admit that I was fearful because there was so much unknown to me. After asking around, I found a local archery club that met a mile from my apartment and thought I was saved. I showed up with my bow set up for hunting out of a treestand. Right away I was told to either get a bow that would allow me to shoot farther or plan on going back to NY to hunt each year. At first, I was more than discouraged, but it began to toughen me up. When I asked the hunters in the group where I might go to get started not a single one would help me. I can’t blame them as they had worked hard to find their own spots and now I had to do it. The archery range where I shoot beckons people from all over and I took it upon myself to approach archers and start asking those questions. I would walk up to them, introduce myself and share what I was trying to do. It wasn’t until I met a young man and his son that I felt I had my first nugget of information. He shared with me a spot to go try and while it would be tough to hunt, it would give me an idea of what hunting was like out here.

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Searching for Huntable Areas

My equipment also needed an upgrade. The bow I had wasn’t cutting for Western hunting. I started asking around; scouring the internet and finally found a bow I wanted to try out. I met the seller at his house and he produced a well-cared for PSE Vengeance compound bow. I had never seen a Vengeance, let alone shoot one. This man helped me in a way he’ll never know. First, we talked and then he insisted I shoot the bow before buying it. While that should be a normal thing to do, I know many people who do not and I was one of them at the time. So I shot it. It felt like it was made just for me. It was a little on the heavier side from what I was used to, but it was a well-built bow with power. As we talked, the man shared that he and his son hunted and that if I ever had any questions or wanted to tag along I was welcome. That gave me hope! While I never did tag along, I am thankful for his support!

During my search for updated equipment, I found another gentleman selling some arrows. Little did I know that this chance meeting would turn into a friendship that would lead to a hunting partner. The purchase of the arrows lead to deeper conversation about hunting in California and hunting partners. It turns out that his partner left for the wilds of Oregon and he was partnerless. We rectified that and within the next couple weeks we were out scouting the area. Some of the areas were not only beautiful, but were exactly what I needed to find.

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Boots

Hunting out here is just as much about finding huntable land and wearing out boot rubber as it is to knowing the regulations and laws. Knowing the season dates should be a given, but there are multiple regulations between different game animals, weaponry, and borderlines of private and public land. I review the regulations and fish & game code often to be certain I am hunting the right area, during the right time, with the proper weapon.

Another factor that I hadn’t bargained for are the rattlesnakes. Unlike many people, I think rattlesnakes are very interesting creatures. Snakes are awesome in my opinion. That being said, rattlers can stay awesome from a good distance and not underfoot! They are everywhere out here and while you may never see one, you still have to protect yourself. Wearing snake boots has become the norm for me. Hopefully my encounters with them will be few and far between.

SoCal

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush SoCal

My advice to anyone wanting to hunt California, or anywhere for that matter, is to ask as many questions as you can. You might be afraid, but everyone has a slight degree of fear. The worst thing anyone can say is ‘No.’ Find the right person and you may gain access to some prime hunting land or land yourself a good friend. The hard work has paid off for me and I know it will for you, too.

Albert Quackenbush has been bowhunting for more than 28 years. He shares his adventures on his blog, SoCalBowhunter.com, and also writes for Bow Adventures e-magazine. He is a Pro Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com, Piranha Custom Bowstrings and Field Logic. He is a member of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, California Deer Association, and is a Life Member of the North American Hunting Club.

Albert was born and raised in New York State where he learned to hunt everything from squirrels to whitetail deer. He currently resides in Southern California with his wife and daughter and hunts year round.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson- So Ladies… Bow Selection for Female Archers


By Emily Anderson
http://www.fromthedraw.com/

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson A woman Archer

As a female archer, there are plenty of options now available that previously were not for women. As more and more women enter the sport of archery, bows are being developed to fit specifically for a woman’s frame. Typically, women have shorter draw lengths, smaller grips, and usually pull less weight. I’m thrilled to see bows that now take these things into consideration for female shooters.

It is critical to make sure that the bow you select fits you correctly. I know that I am guilty of initially wanting to make a bow selection purely based on cosmetic features. And now that bows also have slick names and color choices designed to entice the female buyer, it makes it hard to pay attention to the truly non-aesthetic details.

When considering which bow to buy, keep the following in mind…

1. Grip – How does the bow feel in your hand? Is the grip too big? Too small?

2. Draw Length – If you aren’t sure what your draw length is, visit a local archery shop where they can measure it for you. You want to make sure you find this out prior to purchasing your bow because bows are specifically made for different draw lengths. There is usually an adjustment option available, but there is only so much leeway.

3. Draw Weight – How many pounds can you pull? The draw weight can also be adjusted on bows, but only so much. Make sure that you are buying a bow that you are able to pull back consistently. When the moment of truth occurs and an animal is closing the distance, the last thing you want to happen is to have a bow you are not comfortable pulling back – and being able to HOLD at full draw.

4. Carrying weight – This is one factor that could easily be overlooked. Yes, a bow may feel manageable at the store, but once you start adding on a stabilizer, quiver with arrows, etc., it can all of the sudden feel pretty heavy carrying through the woods. This is especially important if you are planning on hiking through the mountains for extended periods of time.

Emily Anderson - Carrying the Weight of an Elk

Emily Anderson – Carrying the Weight of an Elk

So, ladies, my question to you is… what was the deciding factor when purchasing your bow? Or are you still shopping?

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Pedro Ampuero’s Tracking Dog


By Pedro Ampuero
 AdventurousBowhunter.com

Pedro Ampuero

Keeping in the track of the wounded one between all the group of ibex is not an easy task.

It is very common in Europe the use of dogs for tracking wounded game.They are specialist, and only used with wounded game. It is hard to teach a dog to keep on a cold track of a wounded deer when a fresh one crosses it over. All dogs prefer to follow fresh tracks, but if trained correctly they will keep up with the old one.

Pedro

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero’s Bavarian bloodhound Faco finding an Ibex

Iit is amazing to see these dogs work, since they can follow 24 hours old tracks for over a mile, which is a priceless help for any bowhunter out there. Since not anyone can have a dog and especially the time required to train them, in Spain we have an association with a phone in which you can call and ask for the help of a dog in case you need it.

Pedro

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero Our latest addition to the family RAM

I particularly have two dogs for this purpose, a Bavarian Bloodhound called FACO, and our latest addition RAM, a young german shorthaired pointer. The first one is only used for tracking wounded game, but the second one we will use it also for small game hunting like quails or partridge.

Pedro

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero-Tracking this beast for my Dad.

They are a great partners and it is nice to see them work an old track. I think that any hunter should have access to one of these dogs, since shots are not always as good as we would like to. It is also rewarding to see the hunters face when you find the animal after a long search.

Pedro

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero-Looking for a wildboar my uncle shot the night before.

Shoot straight,
Pedro Ampuero

Pedro is a mechanical engineer by trade and a bowhunter by heart. He is the co-founder of the blog AdventurousBowhunter.com and Cazandoconarco.es and has written many articles for the hunting industry and currently collaborates with the most prestigious companies on the industry.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Very Enticing..


By Albert Quackenbush
SoCalBowhunter.com

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Bow Practice

Four years ago I purchased my first PSE compound bow. It was a 2006 PSE Vengeance. I spent time researching this used bow and found the details to be very enticing. When I met the seller at his house, we spent a great deal of time discussing the bow. Being a lifelong bowhunter himself, he asked that I shoot the bow in his driveway before I purchased it. The fit and feel was just right for me. The draw was smooth, the weight in my hands was perfect and it shot like a dream. The price couldn’t be beat. I made the purchase knowing I had found the right bow for me, but that wasn’t always the case.

One of the biggest challenges I faced growing up was finding the right bow. When I first started shooting a compound bow it was because my dad bought it for me. I shot it often and loved it because he gave it to me, not really thinking about anything else.

Due to lack of knowledge and understanding, I have shot many different bows during my archery career. The most dramatic and hard lesson I learned was when I was 16 years old. I had outgrown my first compound and had to upgrade. My dad took me to a local pro shop to look at some used bows. We could never afford to buy a new one, which I was completely fine with. Just being able to bow hunt was incredible itself.

Once inside the pro shop, we noticed the owner reviewing a bow a gentleman had just brought in to sell. It looked like a great bow and my dad wanted me to try it out. It was selling for a great price and it was within our budget. This is a common mistake made by new bowhunters. They make an impulse buy and later, after shooting it and realizing their mistake, falter and get discouraged.

Albert Quackenbush

Now please understand I do not blame my dad or anyone else. There’s no blame here. It’s a misunderstanding and lack of knowledge. We did not know that you could shoot a few bows, try them out and see which one fit. It felt like we were inconveniencing the pro shop owner by taking our time looking, so we jumped at the chance to buy the used bow. Sure, I shot it (it was a difficult draw) and the bow was way too heavy for my 16 year old frame, but the price was perfect. So we bought it.

For the next two years I shot this bow with my confidence as low as one could imagine. It had no let-off, was heavy and although I was fortunate to take a couple deer with it, I really disliked the bow. With the same tactics as previously described, I went out and bought a new one.

My point in all of this is don’t buy a bow just because it’s on sale or that you think looks cool. Actually take some time to shoot it. Be sure it fits you so that you will own it for a very long time.

I have moved on from that first PSE to other PSE bows because they just fit me even better. I shot a PSE X-Force for years before upgrading to my current PSE Bow Madness. This is a great bow for me and is hands down the best bow I have ever shot. It fits me like a glove, shoots exceptionally well and is quiet. PSE is a company I trust and will be shooting for a very long time.

Albert Quackenbush has been bowhunting for more than 28 years. He shares his adventures on his blog,SoCalBowhunter.com, and also writes for Bow Adventures e-magazine. He is a Pro Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com, Piranha Custom Bowstrings and Field Logic. He is a member of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, California Deer Association, and is a Life Member of the North American Hunting Club.

Albert was born and raised in New York State where he learned to hunt everything from squirrels to whitetail deer. He currently resides in Southern California with his wife and daughter and hunts year round.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Dustin Jones King Fisher


By Dustin Jones
HighCountryBowhunter.com

Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones Bowfishing

The offseason can be hard as a bowhunter. For me once the spring/summer time rolls around I am getting the itch to start bowhunting. I always wanted to go bowfishing but I just never took the time, until this year. I finally went out and bought the PSE Kingfisher and started doing my research. I spoke to several people who mentioned to me that there were some great places to start bowfishing. In fact, they had mentioned some of the size of carp that were caught and I couldn’t believe the sizes. They were telling me 20 and 30 pound carp! That got me even more excited.

Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones Bowfishing Trip

So for Father’s day weekend, my dad and brother headed out to give it a try. Neither of us had ever gone out before but we were all itching to get out and do some hunting. Talk about a great time. We spoke to some guys at the cove we were putting in the boat and said that in this same cove a few weeks ago they shot a 27 pound carp! That definitely got our hopes up.

Dustin Jones

PSE’S Dustin Jones Fish

We trolled out into the cove and started seeing carp surfacing and even jumping completely out of the water. We anchored down and sat there, each of us on an edge of the boat looking and waiting for a carp to swim nearby. We never did see any come near the boat, so my brother and I decided to walk the banks very slowly while my dad tried his hand in the boat still. So with my PSE Kingfisher I crept into a very muddy and shallow cove and started seeing the water swirl nearby. Soon I started seeing fins and the golden scales of carp. I took aim and let the PSE Kingfisher release some havoc on my first carp with a bow. I quickly pulled him in and admired the fact I shot a carp with my PSE bow. I noticed that the carp started swirling again so I quickly put the arrow back on and quickly shot my second carp! I was gleaming. I must have scared them off because I never got another shot in that spot. That was some great practice and it definitely cures the itch to go bowhunting. So if you have played around with the idea of bowfishing, I highly recommend getting into it. My PSE Kingfisher worked perfectly and performed like a charm.

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.

Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Albert Quackenbush BowHunting,”It’s What I do”


By Albert Quackenbush
SoCalBowhunter.com

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush’s DIY Hunter

If you ask anyone who knows me what my passion is I can guarantee their answer will be ‘bow hunting’. Quite honestly, they are right on. When it comes down to it my passion is do-it-yourself bow hunting, or DIY. I enjoy a challenge. I love the hard work that goes into a DIY hunt because the payoff is that much greater.

Take for example hunting deer in Southern California. Sure, there is plenty of public forest land to hunt. You just have to make the effort to get there. Then again, there are also many hunters who like to get out and enjoy the same forest lands I do. In order to steer clear of the other hunters I do my homework. My homework for a DIY hunt starts with scouring over maps to find areas of interest. Sure, I can just hop on a forum and get some details where to go, but where is the adventure in that? I like to find hard to reach areas on a map and see what I can find.

Practicing year round is something I now take great pride in. For me, it is a great way to stay on top of my game. It’s also probably the #1 stress reliever I can think of after a hard work week. I am constantly at the range keeping my body in tune and sending arrows down range.

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush’s Passion

I also like to put the boots to the ground and find my own way. That’s where the scouting comes in. The great thing about SoCal scouting is that there is almost always something to hunt… year round! My trusty PSE Bow Madness always goes with me in case I run across a coyote, a wild hog or a jack rabbit, as they can be hunted year round.

I am as passionate about my family as I am bow hunting. Even still, my wife will attest that no matter what I am doing I can relate it to bow hunting and that I probably mention it far too often for her taste. I’ll be the first to admit that it is a challenge to be a good husband, father, work a full-time job and hunt as often as I get to. If I am not out bow hunting I most assuredly thinking about it or sharing information with someone through a hunting story or seminar. I am a bow hunter and it’s what I do.

Albert Quackenbush has been bowhunting for more than 28 years. He shares his adventures on his blog, SoCalBowhunter.com, and also writes for Bow Adventures e-magazine. He is a Pro Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com, Piranha Custom Bowstrings and Field Logic. He is a member of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, California Deer Association, and is a Life Member of the North American Hunting Club.

Albert was born and raised in New York State where he learned to hunt everything from squirrels to whitetail deer. He currently resides in Southern California with his wife and daughter and hunts year round.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Dustin Jones Finding the Honey Hole


By Dustin Jones
HighCountryBowhunter.com

Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones Scouting

Hunting on public land can be difficult but extremely rewarding. Growing up in Idaho there are plenty of opportunities for over the counter tags and lots of public land to hunt. I am a big fan of do-it-yourself hunts on public land. It’s a challenge not only to find the animals, but the fact that you have to be aware of the other hunters and stay one step ahead of them as well.

The key with public land is you have to put in the time. The time that is put in when finding that “honey hole” of  a hunting spot on public ground starts early and carries over from season to season. I spend a good amount of time studying maps and finding areas that look promising. Sometimes you find that honey hole and sometimes you find a spot that every other hunter in the state loves to hunt.

Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones My Passion

What I enjoy the most is hunting deep in the back country. I like to drive until the road ends and then hike a few miles into the mountains where very few people are. These areas are the ones that I treasure the most mainly because of the time it takes to scout and get familiar with the area. Nothing compares to a 3 or 4 day hunt where you pack everything you need on your back to try and harvest an animal. Most of the time I hear of hunters that spend all this time in the woods in hopes of seeing an animal and come back feeling like it was an unsuccessful hunt. Whenever I get to spend a few days in the back country chasing wild game I consider that a successful hunt.

Even though I am passionate about bow hunting, my true passion is my family. Taking time to hunt definitely takes time away from my family and balancing that time can be a challenge. It is something that I am aware of and try hard to make sure that it doesn’t interfere with the time I spend with them.  I enjoy taking my wife and my son out on scouting trips and spending that time with them to show them what I look for. It is a great way to share both of my passions; my family and bow hunting.

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.

Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Will Jenkins- Make the Shot


By Will Jenkins
 TheWilltoHunt.com 

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins Tree Stand Practice

With the season fast approaching many folks are focusing on broadhead tuning and putting lots of holes in foam. While this is all good and necessary one thing I find myself and many others lacking as we get close to season is practicing how you’ll be hunting. This means putting arrows through foam while you are in situations similar to how you will be hunting.

Most people hunt from tree stands and of course this is extremely different from standing on flat ground and making an easy shot. Not only that you’re wearing different clothes and a safety harness but you’re also standing on an 18″ x 24″ platform 20 feet up a tree. I’d suggest when setting or checking stands bring your bow and a small target and put a few arrows in the target through each of your shooting lanes. Making sure you have adequate room to move and draw is just as important as practicing from that height and angle. It’s critical to make sure you’re comfortable to draw and bend at the waist to make the shot. I usually go in with a friend and we take turns pulling arrows and sending them backup a quiver hooked to a pull rope and moving the target. This not only makes you better prepared to make the shot it’s a great boost to your confidence. When that big buck walks out into your shooting lane and you know you’ve made that shot before it feels good!

Will Jenkins

PSE’s Will Jenkins Bow Hunting Practice

Lately it seems more people are hunting from ground blinds. Practicing sitting down is key but it’s also key to practice sitting down and out of your blind. If you’ve ever tried shooting out of a blind understanding you clearance is huge. If you aren’t careful while your sight might be aimed just out the window your arrow could be pointed right at the wall of the blind. The good news with this is its way easier to practice. You can throw up your blind and a stool most anywhere you’d normally shoot to get used to shooting out of it.

With the season drawing nearer, in weeks or days be sure you’ve had some practical bow hunting practice and you’re confident you can make the shot when it counts!

Will Jenkins is creator of TheWilltoHunt.com and Harnesses For Hunters. He’s an avid outdoorsman who enjoys sharing his experiences through his blog. He also writes for Bow Adventures e-Magazine and is a member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association.

Will lives in Central Virginia with his wife and two kids. He hunts in Virginia and Maryland but has dreams of heading west to hunt Elk and Mule Deer.

 

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Pedro Ampuero Enjoying the freedom of the Outdoors


By Pedro Ampuero
 AdventurousBowhunter.com

Pedro Ampuero

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero Backpacking

I have to admit I love every way of hunting, all of them have something special, but the one that fulfills me more is mountain hunting.

You realize how small we are in this vast world. Being alone in the middle of nowhere, just hearing the sound of wind, with only your own tracks behind is one of the best ways of getting out of the rush way of living in this modern world and truly enjoying outdoors freedom.

Pedro Ampuero

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero’s Snow tracks in the Tian Shan, Kyrgyzstan

The mountains challenge us both physically and mentally, having the capacity of taking the best and worst of you. It is tough and beautiful at the same time, and when you try it for the first time, either you hate it or get in love with it for the rest of your life.

Pedro Ampuero

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero in a Blizzard

In Spain we can hunt the Chamois and the Spanish ibex, which are two gorgeous animals. The Spanish ibex is very well known because of its beauty, and many hunters visit Spain to try to get one with the bow every year. On the other hand, the chamois is typically a more challenging, since it leaves on a tougher terrain, and although its trophy may not be as beautiful as the ibex, it’s my favorite in the Spanish Peninsula.

Pedro Ampuero

SE’s Pedro Ampuero Ibex Dani

The world is full of sheep, goats, ibex, argalis, etc.. In some of the most astonishing and wildest places on earth, which just being there makes any hunt worthy.

I would say the most important thing you need for hunting in the mountains, especially with the bow is patience. Never rush and learn to take your time before making a decision. A wrong decision can take you lot of useless hiking and waste a lot of time of your hunt.

Pedro Ampuero

PSE’s Pedro Ampuero Dall Sheep

Get prepared for your next mountain hunt to take the best out of you,

Good luck,
Pedro Ampuero

Pedro is a mechanical engineer by trade and a bowhunter by heart. He is the co-founder of the blog AdventurousBowhunter.com and Cazandoconarco.es and has written many articles for the hunting industry and currently collaborates with the most prestigious companies on the industry.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

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PSE’s Albert Quackenbush – Proud Bow Hunter


By Albert Quackenbush
SoCalBowhunter.com

Albert Quackenbush

PSE’s Albert Quackenbush Target Practice

Hunting has been in my family for as long as I remember. My dad and brother are the two best hunting partners a guy could ask for. We would spend all year discussing the previous year, the weather, where to place stands and when October would arrive so we could get in the woods. Sure, we hunted for small game and turkey, but the animal we most desired was the whitetail deer. I took it for granted, until I moved 3,000 miles away.

Where I grew up in New York State everyone hunted. When I moved to California that all changed. It was a new place with new friends who didn’t understand hunting. Then married a woman who doesn’t care for hunting, but she appreciates the passion I have for it. I am a proud bow hunter and I am not afraid to share it.

I have actually made some great new friends through bow hunting in California. Some of the guys are my new bow hunting partners. Every week we hit the archery range to practice and talk about the upcoming archery seasons and what we can hunt. I look forward to it each and every week.

Now that my daughter is three and a half, I have started sharing more and more of the outdoors with her. I have never hidden the fact that I hunt, nor will I be ashamed of it. Sometimes, when I am watching a hunting show on television, she’ll hop on my lap and point out the animals onscreen. It makes me proud to know she knows the animals and sees the hunters in pursuit of wild game.

When I get home wearing camouflage face paint, she often jokingly asks me if I am wearing makeup. Of course I reply that indeed I am!

Al Quackenbush

PSE’s Al Quackenbush Teaching his Daughter to Shoot

Just recently, my daughter and I ventured to a sporting goods retailer and we picked out her very first bow. While I was introduced to archery when I was nine, I figured she could start earlier if she wanted to. Sure, she’s not going want to focus on it for more than five minutes, but she should have fun and shoot some arrows like her dad if she wants to. Enthusiastically, she said that she wanted the bow and also loved seeing all of the taxidermy around.

The next day, we got her bow out of the package and she shot for the first time. Like most kids, she was frustrated at first. With a little patience and coaxing, she was shooting arrows and smiling in no time. You can bet that I will be sharing more bow hunting tips and techniques as we both age gracefully.

Albert Quackenbush has been bowhunting for more than 28 years. He shares his adventures on his blog, SoCalBowhunter.com, and also writes for Bow Adventures e-magazine. He is a Pro Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com, Piranha Custom Bowstrings and Field Logic. He is a member of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, California Deer Association, and is a Life Member of the North American Hunting Club.

Albert was born and raised in New York State where he learned to hunt everything from squirrels to whitetail deer. He currently resides in Southern California with his wife and daughter and hunts year round.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Dustin Jones – An Unforgettable Moment


By Dustin Jones
HighCountryBowhunter.com

PSE  Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones & Son

Sharing my love for bowhunting is something that I truly enjoy. When my wife and I were dating, she didn’t know very much about hunting. In fact when she would come over and we would watch old hunting tapes or watch hunting shows, she couldn’t stand watching. I made sure not to force it on her but to share why I enjoy it so much. To show her how much fun it could be, I gave her a bow and we started shooting the 3-D range in the evenings whenever we could. Her comment to me was that she could shoot targets but not a real animal. This was perfectly fine with me. I get to take her out and practice and share my love for archery with my wife.

I get to share it even more now with my son. He just turned 3 and taking him to archery shoots to teach him just as my dad did is an experience that I will never forget. I got him his first bow not too long ago and seeing his face light up and how excited he got is an unforgettable moment. I knew the excitement he felt and I know now how my dad felt.

Dustin Jones

PSE’s Dustin Jones’ Son

I got to take my son to a 3-D archery shoot and start teaching him how to shoot his bow. This was truly a memorable experience. He loved to see all the animal targets and of course he had to carry his “noculars” (binoculars) just like his dad. We pretended we were hunting and had to look for the animal and then sneak up to make the shot. His first archery experience was a success! Spending that time passing on what I have learned from my dad onto my son was a moment I’ll never forget.

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.

Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


I Shot It With My PSE!


I Shot It With My PSE!

I Shot It With My PSE!

Send us your “I Shot It With My PSE!” pics! Tags us on Twitter @PSEBows, Instagram #psebows, or post them on our Facebook page www.facebook.com/OfficialPSEArchery.


PSE’s Jared Bloomgren – Share Bowhunting with your Family and Friends


By Jared “J-Rod” Bloomgren

Jared Bloomgren and Family

Jared Bloomgren and Family


I share bowhunting with my family and friends in many different ways. To this day I still bowhunt with my older brothers every chance I get. My biggest bull elk to date was shared with one of my brothers and another memory that will never be forgotten. My other brother and I go on bowhunting trips together when we can. He has four children who also love the thrill they get while hunting. My best friend and I venture out on backcountry trips often looking for the elusive trophy bucks and bulls we all seek. Every one of these adventures with friends and family is cherished beyond recognition and brings us closer.

Jared Bloomgren and Wife

Jared Bloomgren and Wife


Most importantly, I share my hunting with my wife and children. My wife is a very good shot and I have enjoyed watching her shoot numerous deer and it makes me flood with emotions of happiness every time she goes out with me. This last spring turkey season my 2 year old daughter went hunting with me for the first time and each time we went out it was purely magical and amazing. I know my son will do the same. The feeling of being a father is unlike anything else in this world. I now know what my Dad meant when he would say these things. Thank you Dad!

Jared Bloomgren and Friend

Jared Bloomgren and Friend


Bowhunting is such a part of me, being able to share it with my family and friends make it even better than can be explained or imagined!

Jared “J-Rod” Bloomgren is a hardcore Do-It-Yourself bowhunter who strives to better himself each year in the outdoor community. As a professional hunter, freelance writer and photographer, he likes to relive his outdoor adventures through written expression and photography making the reader feel as if they were along on the hunt. He attributes much of his success to the vital education he has learned from the various big game animals that he hunts. He is quoted as saying, “In each and every hunt, success or defeat, I learn something from every outing and that I can put in my arsenal of knowledge to use at a later date, a later date that will again put my wits against that of my prey.”

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Emily Anderson – The Count Down to ELK!


By Emily Anderson
www.FromTheDraw.com 

Emily Anderson

PSE’s Emily Anderson

If you ask me what hunt, I count down the days for each year, I’ll respond without hesitation… Elk!  For this reason, September has a special place in my heart.  Ever since I first heard a bugle echo across a ridge top, I’ve been unable to get the sound out of my head.  The sound is haunting, frightening, and glorious all wrapped up together. However, I don’t mind having it stuck in my head.  On the contrary, I look forward to the chance each year to sneak into a bull’s backyard and have him bark a warning call announcing that I am now in HIS territory.  The bugles in the recesses of my memory are easily recalled when I think of these close encounters.  I’m reminded of moments when a bugling elk was so close that every hair on the back of my neck stood at attention.  And there’s the time when I caught a bull dead in his tracks five yards away from where I sat, and I got to enjoy another bugle and snot blowing demonstration.  And still another memory floods back of the time I slept above timberline and listened to two bulls fight in the meadow nearby while the cows mewed and walked all around my tent.

Allen Fader

Allen Fader

As the aspen leaves begin to show hints of gold each year, you can be guaranteed that my husband and I will be heading out on public land in the wilderness of Colorado.  That is the style of hunting we prefer in our home state… do-it-yourself on public lands.  In my opinion, DIY hunting feels as if the reward is just a little bit greater when you head out on a hunt, unguided and tearing up the tread on your hiking boots.  I want to plant my feet on high places and travel through thick forested lands in my quest to arrow whatever animal I have a tag in my pocket for… and most likely, it will be elk!

Yes, September feels a little bit like Christmas to me.  I get to spend several weeks up in the mountains of Colorado enjoying God’s creation all around me, and if I’m lucky, I’ll release an arrow and come home with meat to fill my freezer.

Emily Anderson’s hunting journey began shortly after she got married. She enjoys the passions for the outdoors, hunting and fishing as a team with her husband. She established www.FromTheDraw.com as a way to share her stories as a female hunter. Emily lives in Colorado and is currently on an Elk hunt. She is now a PSE Staff Blogger and will be posting daily about her experiences and views on archery and hunting.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.


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