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How To Setup Your Sights – Q & A with PSE’s Bobby V


Bobby V explains the proper way to sight in your bow. To see other’s opinions on the question, go to our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/OfficialPSEArchery.


The Elk Hunt That Took PSE’s Marty Henrikson 10 Years


 

PSE’s Marty Henrikson

PSE’s Marty Henrikson

Editor’s Note:  Marty Henrikson of Tucson, Arizona, has been shooting PSE bows for 36 years. Henrikson, an avid bowhunter, competed for many years on the 3D archery circuit and also won the Arizona Cup in the compound division.

Question: Marty, tell us about the elk that took you 10 years to hunt.

One of the prime units for taking trophy elk in Arizona is Unit 10, and I had made up my mind that I was going to hunt this unit. Since Unit 10 was known for having giant elk, I decided that regardless of how long the hunt took, I was going to hunt the unit. For 10 years, I put in to hunt this unit, and finally on the 10th year, I was drawn. When I finally drew the tag, I was more than excited. I made a point to scout the unit before the hunt. On the second day of the hunt, I was up and moving long before daylight. I went to a spot where I thought I could hear elk bugling, and I bugled before first light. I had elk bugling all around me. I could tell there was a bull in the distance that was moving my way. I was hunting with a friend of mine, who stayed behind me to do the calling. Just at daylight, my friend made three cow calls, and we watched the bull come in until he was about 30 to 40 yards away from us. I drew the bow and was at full draw, when I think the bull spotted me. The bull expected to see the cow that had been calling, and when he didn’t see her but saw me instead, he turned back and went in the direction from which he had come. However, when the bull was at about 60 yards, he turned and looked back, giving me a broadside shot. I took the shot with my PSE Mach 6. After the elk went down, I went over to him, and my buddy went to get the truck. We spent 3 hours skinning, field dressing and butchering the animal. Fortunately, we didn’t have too far to carry the meat once it was quartered, since my friend was able to bring the truck fairly close to where we were. This bull had a 52 inch wide spread and scored 135 inches.

One of the advantages of shooting tournament archery is that you have the opportunity to build a lot of confidence in your ability to shoot accurately from many different distances. In the West where I hunt, most of the archers practice shooting out to 100 yards. Our terrain is so open that most of the time you expect to have to take a shot at more than 30 yards. If you practice at distances from 0 to 100 yards, you can build your confidence to know you can make a 100 yard shot. Then, if an animal shows up inside 100 yards, you will feel confident in your ability to make a good shot, and the arrow will fly true. Because of this 100 yard practice shooting, I felt really confident that I could make a lethal hit on an elk size target at 60 yards. That was a great hunt, and this is the biggest elk I’d ever taken.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Marty Henrikson Has Bear’s Teeth and Claws at 15 Yards

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Marty Henrikson Takes a 170 Class Bow Buck


PSE’s Marty Henrikson

PSE’s Marty Henrikson

Editor’s Note:  Marty Henrikson of Tucson, Arizona, has been shooting PSE bows for 36 years. Henrikson, an avid bowhunter, competed for many years on the 3D archery circuit and also won the Arizona Cup in the compound division.

Question: Tell us about another deer you’ve taken with your PSE bow.

In 1973, I took a very memorable mule deer. I glassed him when he was up on a hill, and then he moved down into some flats. I had seen the buck in the morning and went back later in the day to try and hunt him. He had been traveling with a lot of does in the morning, and that made him hard to stalk.  When I went back in the afternoon, I found the buck again, but he only had one doe with him. So, I was certain I could get in close enough to get a shot, and I started stalking the deer. Moving silently, and using the terrain and cover to keep the buck from seeing me, I came to within 30 yards of the deer. When I’m stalking, I like to use my binoculars to see how and where the deer is moving. I only will take a half or one whole step before taking another look at the deer. I’ve learned that by going slow, and constantly reading the deer’s attitude as well as his movement, I can make better decisions on when and where to move, and where the deer is going.

After I had moved about 15 yards, the doe spotted me and started stomping her feet. When the doe saw me, I was on my knees crawling. Although she knew there was something moving in front of her, she wasn’t really sure what I was. She continued to close the distance between us, but was at full alert. The doe walked up to within 35 yards of me, and then started to turn to leave the area. The doe was out in front of the buck and now was staring at me. I went ahead and drew my bow, but the buck still wasn’t sure of what I was. So, he hesitated. Before the buck turned to leave, he gave me just enough time to release my arrow. I took that buck with a PSE Mach 6. When I saw that the big 170 class buck was down, I walked over to him and marked a waypoint on my GPS receiver. I always carry a hand held GPS receiver in my pack. Usually I have to walk to the truck and get my freighter pack and then walk back to the deer to butcher and pack him out. That hand held GPS makes finding your deer much easier when you go back in to bring him out. The type of country I hunt usually doesn’t give its hunters the advantage of being able to get an animal to the nearest road. Most western hunters know that when we take a mule deer or a Coues deer, we will have to do our own field dressing, skinning and packing the animal out in the field. For this reason, I always bring along a frame pack and a GPS. I don’t like to hunt with a frame pack on my back, so I usually leave it in the truck. I’ll mark a waypoint spot where I park the truck on the GPS and then also mark a waypoint where I leave the deer. When I mark these waypoint spots, it makes traveling to and from the truck and my deer quicker and easier. I can get to my pack, go back to the deer, carry out the first load of meat, make a return trip and depending on how big the animal is, get the rest of the deer out as soon as possible

Tomorrow: The Elk Hunt That Took PSE’s Marty Henrikson 10 Years

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


A Hunter’s Dream Bow and Buck with PSE’s Marty Henrikson


PSE’s Marty Henrikson

PSE’s Marty Henrikson

Editor’s Note:  Marty Henrikson of Tucson, Arizona, has been shooting PSE bows for 36 years. Henrikson, an avid bowhunter, competed for many years on the 3D archery circuit and also won the Arizona Cup in the compound division.

Question: Marty, why did you start shooting PSE bows?

I started shooting PSE bows as soon as I discovered that recurve bows weren’t very efficient. Even back in those days, like today, PSE had some of the newest technology in bow design. PSE made a bow called the Pacer, and as a graduation gift from high school, I received the PSE Laser Magnum.  I was very successful with the Laser Magnum and hunted with it for several years. The Laser was so dependable; I never saw a reason to change from PSE bows.

Question: Do you strictly bowhunt, or do you also shoot target archery?

For a number of years, I competed on the 3D archery circuit. I was also fortunate enough to compete in the Arizona Cup and won it a few years ago in the compound division. However, since that win, I’ve primarily been a bowhunter.

Question: What’s one of the best animals you’ve taken with your PSE bow?

In 2006, I took the number three Coues deer in the world taken with a bow. The buck scored just over 119 on the P&Y scale. In Arizona, we have a September hunt. At that time of the year, we normally sit over water holes to hunt, because it’s usually hot and dry, and the deer come to water holes. But in 2006, we had had a wet September, and there was plenty of water. So, I decided to go out and stalk. I found a group of deer with five bucks ranging in sizes from a spike up to the nice deer I took. My deer was a 4X4, which is considered a 10 point by eastern count. The herd of bucks was on the move, and I was hoping I could watch them bed down. The deer kept moving, and I finally lost sight of them. Because I knew the direction they were traveling, I decided to go look for them, once they were out of my sight. I was on a rock outcrop by the time I got close to the spot where I’d last seen the bucks. I spotted some movement below me, which was a whole herd of deer. The deer came out directly below me, and I ranged them at 35 to 40 yards.

The first two bucks in the herd were spikes – two nice looking 3 points, which were considered 8 points by eastern count. On any other hunt, I would have been happy to have a chance to take either one of those deer. Each of those bucks was in the 90 to 100 point range on Pope & Young, but I had seen that big buck and wanted to wait for him. Finally, my big buck showed up in the back of the herd. When my buck stepped behind a cedar tree, I drew my bow and waited. I had to hold my bow for a long time, waiting for him to step out from behind the tree. When he finally came out and presented a clean shot, he was at such a severe angle to me that I had to put my 30 yard pin about 2 inches above the bottom of his chest. The arrow entered the deer about 78 inches above where I was holding my 30 yard pin and went out the other side of the deer, taking out both lungs. He ran about 50 yards and stopped, and I got to see him fall over. Because I was hunting by myself, I had to field dress, pack the deer and put him in a freighter pack. I took that deer with a PSE AR 34.

I knew how to aim because of my years in tournament archery, and especially from being at the Redding Shoot in Redding, California. That entire tournament required the archer to estimate range from the tops to the bottoms of the hills, and all the distances in between.  It was at that tournament that I really learned how to shoot accurately from a severe angle above the target. Too, if you live in Arizona, rarely will you ever shoot an animal on level ground.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Marty Henrikson Takes a 170 Class Bow Buck

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Keith Hubbard Got his Bear in Southern Arizona


PSE's Keith Hubbard

PSE’s Keith Hubbard

 

With record high temps this past weekend…my honey hole paid off again. In a 24 hour period, I had 5 bears come in. The first afternoon yielded a large sow and cub. On the second day, I was about to climb into my tree stand when I heard a noise. I looked up the hill and saw this bear coming in, so I detached my safety harness, untied my bow and waited for her to enter the water. As she walked in, I sneaked over to within 15 yards, after spending 1 minute or so in the water she began to turn around so I drew. When she stopped, she was facing me, but a few seconds later she turned enough to give me a quartering shot. The arrow entered the shoulder and exited the opposite rear quarter; she ran about 70 yards and piled up. I can’t get over how fast the Omen Pro is at 70 #’s. It left a serious path of destruction. While I was taking photos and skinning her, I had two other bears walk in on me. What a great day to be on a sky island.

Keith Hubbard, PSE Gorilla Squad


PSE’s Frank Pearson Talks about the Myth of Target Panic


PSE’s Frank Pearson

PSE’s Frank Pearson

Editor’s Note: Frank Pearson, owner and operator of the Frank Pearson School of Archery and the personal archery coach for Pete Shepley, founder and owner of PSE Archery, has seen the evolution of the bow from the longbow when he first started shooting and competed with up to today’s modern bows and most technical PSE equipment. If anyone knows archery, and how to help an archer shoot better, you can rely on Pearson. This week Frank Pierson will give us practical tips on how to shoot better, whether you are a tournament archer or a bowhunter.

Question: Frank, how do you solve the problem of target panic?

Never use the words, target panic again. The real problem is distance panic. The way we solve this problem is I have the archer stand 3 yards from the target, put a 3 inch spot on that target, have the archer pull the bow back, line up the target in the rear sight, put his front sight in the middle of that dot and go through his shot routine with a long follow through after the shot. When he or she releases the arrow, I want the archer to stand in position like an archery mannequin. If you remain in the same position after the shot as you’ve been in before the shot, an animal never will see you move, and you’ll have a clean follow through. But, if you let your release arm fly around after the shot, and an animal spots you, sometimes it can duck the shot. Then you’ll have to add another 100 yards to your tracking before you find your animal, because it saw you move. The first night of practice before bow season should be at 3 yards. The next night, move the target back to 4 yards from where you’re shooting. The next night, move the target out to 5 yards. Continue to move the target at 1 yard increments, and adjust your sights until you are shooting 45 yards accurately. Use this system every night, until you have your target at 45 yards. Then you’ll realize there’s no such thing as target panic or buck fever. You can’t get rid of target panic by trying to shoot a 60 yard target. If you have target panic at 60 yards and continue to shoot 60 yards, you’ll have target panic forever. But if you start off shooting at 3 yards with your 60 yard pin and then sight in at 4 yards to hit the target in the center every time at 4 yards, you consistently move that target back 1 yard per day, and you consistently sight in and shoot each day accurately, then you’ll see that you can shoot accurately at any distance that you want to take a shot. You show me an archer that has target panic, and I‘ll show you an archer who refuses to use this system to eliminate target panic. They may think they’re too good as shooters to start off shooting at 3 yards and move the target 1 yard every day. Or, perhaps they’re too lazy to put this much time and effort into solving the problem.

Question: Frank, why have you stayed in archery as long as you have?

My wife says it’s because I like it, and I guess that’s true. We have 14 fields set up here at my house for shooting archery. They are much like a golf course, so that the students can shoot from 10 yards to 8 yards from 14 different stations. My play room in my house is 3,000 feet with 10 foot ceilings, so I can shoot 30 yards indoors. My play room is also set up, so that I can open my side door, stand inside and shoot outside up to 50 yards if there’s rain, or the weather’s too hot to go outside. I guess I am eaten up with the sport of archery. And I don’t think that is a bad thing.

For more information go to http://www.frankpearson.com

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Frank Pearson Tells What You Learn at Archery School


PSE’s Frank Pearson

PSE’s Frank Pearson

Editor’s Note: Frank Pearson, owner and operator of the Frank Pearson School of Archery and the personal archery coach for Pete Shepley, founder and owner of PSE Archery, has seen the evolution of the bow from the longbow when he first started shooting and competed with up to today’s modern bows and most technical PSE equipment. If anyone knows archery, and how to help an archer shoot better, you can rely on Pearson. This week Frank Pierson will give us practical tips on how to shoot better, whether you are a tournament archer or a bowhunter.

Question: Frank, how long does your archery school last?

The school lasts for 2 days, and most of my students either work in the archery department of large sporting goods stores, or they are owners of bow shops that they are about to open. These people must know how to fit their customers with the right weight bow and the right draw length. They also come to learn how to teach people how to shoot their bows accurately. They also need to know how to fletch arrows and make bow strings and cables. I also coach tournament archers who have won world championships. Tim Gillingham, who works with Gold Tip Arrows has been one of my students.

Question: Frank, you and your wife still compete in archery don’t you? How long do you think you can continue to be a competitive shooter?

Yes, my wife and I still compete. And, I think I can continue to shoot competitive archery as long as my body holds up. My body feels better this year than it has in the last 5 years. About 2 years ago I had to have stents put in my arteries, because they were clogged up with cholesterol. I had to take some medicine, and when the doctors took me off the medicine, I decided the medicine was messing up my archery. I began to feel better and shoot better. I am 72 years, old, I’m starting to get my strength back, and I’m shooting better.

Question: Frank, how big of a role does your mental attitude play in your ability to shoot accurately?

If you have a bow that fits you pretty good, you haven’t taken any lessons on shooting the bow, you’ve bought a handful of arrows and a target, and every night when you’ve come home from work, you shoot 10 or 15 arrows in the back yard, then after a few months, you’ll be a pretty good shot. After you reach that point, then the rest of the sport of archery and shooting accurately and consistently is mental. You need the strength to pull a bow back, and you need to make sure that somebody hasn’t sold you a 70 pound bow, and you only have a 50 pound bow body. With the new PSE bows. I’m shooting 51 pounds, and my arrows are traveling at 300 feet per second, so everything else is mental. The most critical part of your mental attitude to shoot accurately is what you’re thinking about when you pull the bow back.

Question: What should you be thinking about when you first start your draw, and what should you be thinking about all the way through drawing the bow?

When you pull the bow back, if you’re concerned about taking a big game animal or hitting a target, instead of being concerned about going correctly through your shot routine, then you’re in trouble. If you have a shot routine and go through the four steps of your shot routine just as you start to draw the bow and all the way through your follow through, you’ll be much more successful and shoot more accurately than if you’re thinking about the target. Here are the four things I recommend that you do in your shot routine, depending on the equipment you’re using:

  • Make sure your arrow is on the string properly.
  • Be certain your arrow is on the rest properly.
  • Make sure you’re looking through the peep sight and that the pin you’re using to aim with is in the center of the peep sight, when you draw the bow.
  • Follow through with your shot when you release the arrow.

If the bowhunter who comes home every day after work and shoots 10 or 15 arrows in the back yard, goes through this shot routine every time he prepares to shoot an arrow, then he drastically improves his chance for success on every hunt. Most of the time when the hunter or the target archer misses, he or she hasn’t gone through the shot routine before the shot or have misjudged the distance to the target.

Question: Frank, how should the arrow sit on the string?

Most archers today use a d-loop on their bow strings, and they attach a mechanical release to the d-loop, instead of to the string. Most of the time there is a little more space in the d-loop than is required for the nock of the arrow. The reason for that space is because when you get the bow back to full draw, the angle of the string changes. So, you have to make sure your arrow fits tight on the string. I always put my nock at the top of the d-loop and then slide the nock up and snap it on.

Question: How does the arrow need to sit on the rest?

If you are using a drop away rest, you have to make sure that the arrow is sitting on the drop away and not sitting on the shelf. If you get all excited because there is a great big elk in front of you, and you put the arrow on the shelf and not the drop away, then when you draw the arrow back, it still will be sitting on the shelf and not the drop away, and you’ll miss the shot. There is a certain way that the arrow needs to sit on each type of rest, and if you don’t make sure the arrow is sitting where it’s supposed to on the rest you’re shooting before you take the shot, you won’t shoot accurately. Some people shoot with a launcher blade that has the stem sitting up and a V in the top of the stem. If you put the cock vein up on the rest, you will shoot accurately. But if you put the arrow on the string with the cock vein down, the arrow will come out of the bow, the cock vein will hit the rest, and you will miss the shot. Therefore, depending on the type of rest you’re using, you have to make sure before you take the shot that the arrow is in the proper position for the kind of rest you have before you draw the bow.

Question: The third part of the shot routine that you mentioned was to make sure you’re looking though your peep site before you take the shot. Then make sure the pin that you’re aiming with on the front of the bow is in the center of the peep site. Is that correct?

Absolutely. If the front pin is not right in the center of the peep site before you release the arrow, you won’t shoot as accurately as you can.

Question: The fourth step of the shot routine is follow through. Why is that so important?

When you have the bow at full draw, and you’re preparing to take the shot, you want to make sure you have the equal amount of pressure with the hand you’re using to hold the bow and an equal amount of pressure of the hand you’re using to draw the string. If you don’t feel the same amount of pressure on your bow hand that you feel on the hand that has the release in it, you won’t get a good shot. I recommend that you have 2 pounds of pressure push on the bow hand and 2 pounds of pressure on the release hand. If you don’t have equal pressure on both hands before you take the shot, you can’t have a good follow through, and the follow through is critical for a good shot.

For more information go to http://www.frankpearson.com.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Frank Pearson Talks about the Myth of Target Panic

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


How To Set The VibraCheck Backstop Length – Q & A with PSE’s Bobby V


Bobby V explains the proper placement of backstops and how to adjust the VibraCheck backstop.  To see other’s opinions on the question, go to our Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/OfficialPSEArchery.


PSE’s Frank Pearson Says to Always Have Your Bow Tuned


PSE’s Frank Pearson

PSE’s Frank Pearson

Editor’s Note: Frank Pearson, owner and operator of the Frank Pearson School of Archery and the personal archery coach for Pete Shepley, founder and owner of PSE Archery, has seen the evolution of the bow from the longbow when he first started shooting and competed with up to today’s modern bows and most technical PSE equipment. If anyone knows archery, and how to help an archer shoot better, you can rely on Pearson. This week Frank Pierson will give us practical tips on how to shoot better, whether you are a tournament archer or a bowhunter.

Question: What is another often overlooked aspect of shooting the bow that creates problems for tournament archers and bowhunters?

Not having their bows tuned. One of the first things I teach at my archery school is how to correctly tune a bow.

Question: What is the most important part of tuning a bow?

All the points of tuning a bow are important. The most common problem I see is not having the cams on your bow in time. The second most important thing is that a compound bow is much like a pair of shoes. The bow has to be set up to fit the shooter. If you buy a pair of shoes that don’t fit, you’re going to consistently have problems with those shoes, because they don’t fit you. The same is true of a bow. Each bow has to be set up to fit each individual shooter. A lot of people think that they need to shoot an extra long draw length, because they believe that extra long draw length delivers more speed to the arrow. But extra long won’t deliver the accuracy that you need, if the bow doesn’t fit you. The way your bow fits you plays a major role in how accurately you shoot, just like the right size shoe is the deciding factor in how comfortably you walk and stand. If your bow doesn’t fit you right, there’s no way you can shoot consistently and accurately.

Another factor that plays a major role in shooting accurately is the weight of the bow that you choose to shoot. If the bow is too heavy for you to draw comfortably, you may not shoot accurately, and there’s a good chance you’ll hurt yourself. I believe that any hunter who’s only going to hunt with a bow about 3 months out of the year doesn’t need a bow with a heavier draw weight than 60 pounds. There is no big game animal in the United States that you can’t take with a 60 pound bow, especially with the PSE bows. Ten years ago you probably needed a 75 pound bow to get the same type of performance that you can produce with a 60 pound PSE bow today. The reason that this statement is true is the technology that is being used today in bow designs has increased the performance of the bows that much in 10 years. PSE has engineers on the company’s research and development staff that many other bow companies wish they had. These engineers are really, really good at what they do, and they are consistently learning how to build more performance and speed into bows and allow the archers to pull less weight.

For more information go to http://www.frankpearson.com

Tomorrow: Take Care of Your Bowhunting Equipment to Shoot Accurately with PSE’s Frank Pearson

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Learn How to Judge Distance with PSE’s Frank Pearson


PSE’s Frank Pearson

PSE’s Frank Pearson

Editor’s Note: Frank Pearson, owner and operator of the Frank Pearson School of Archery and the personal archery coach for Pete Shepley, founder and owner of PSE Archery, has seen the evolution of the bow from the longbow when he first started shooting and competed with up to today’s modern bows and most technical PSE equipment. If anyone knows archery, and how to help an archer shoot better, you can rely on Pearson. This week Frank Pierson will give us practical tips on how to shoot better, whether you are a tournament archer or a bowhunter.

Question: Frank what is the number one question most archers want to know the answer to that will enable them to shoot better?

One of the biggest problems in archery today is judging distance. This problem was created when archers put sights on their bows. When we were shooting longbows and recurves, we shot instinctively. We looked at the targets we wanted to hit and mentally calculated the arcs of the arrows as they flew from the bows to the targets. We never had to judge distance in terms of yardage. However, to shoot accurately today with sights, fast bows, and high tech equipment, judging distance may be the number one factor that determines whether or not you make a successful shot on target, after you’ve successfully set up a shot routine (read last week’s series of articles to gain more information on your shot routine). When students come to my bowhunting school, especially target archers, they think there’s some trick to estimating distance. One of the terms that they use is to gap their targets with their sights (guesstimate the exact distance between sight pins set at specific ranges). They also think that the archers who consistently win archery tournaments and successfully take deer each season have some kind of devices on their bows that help them better judge distance. But this isn’t what the successful archers are doing. The secret to estimating distance is so old that many people have forgotten how to do it. The way you learn to judge distance to the target is to practice judging distance and then actually measure that distance. Successful tournament archers and bowhunters spend more time practicing judging distance than they do practicing shooting their bows. What I usually tell a person who is just getting started in 3D archery is, “If you want to be a good shooter, carry a range finder with you at all times during the day. Keep looking at objects that you believe to be 30 yards away and guessing that distance. Then take your range finder, look at the target, get the exact distance and see how far off you are from the actual distance to the target. Once they learn what 30-yards looks like, they won’t have to guess at that distance any more.

Question: OK, once you learn what 30-yards from you to a target looks like, how do you learn the other ranges that 3D archers or bowhunters have to know to shoot accurately?

The reason for learning what 30 yards looks like is because most 3D targets are set up no farther away than 45 yards. Once you know what 30 yards look like, then you can much more easily determine the distance out to 45 yards or back in to zero. Then you need to next learn to determine 40 yards. If you don’t spend the time to learn those two distances, you may as well not shoot 3D archery. Then you can begin to determine the other distances you need to know to shoot accurately. The real secret to shooting tournament archery or to consistently becoming a successful bowhunter is to spend more time judging distance than you do shooting the bow. In this day and age, and with the equipment we have today, I don’t think a bowhunter should be permitted to hunt unless he carries a range finder with him on the hunt.

Question: Frank, why do you feel this way?

Most bowhunters only shoot their bow 3 months out of the year. They pick up their bows the month before hunting season starts and try to get their muscles in shape and their shooting form perfected. However, they’re not going to be proficient in guessing yardage. Using range finders is legal for archers in every state, and I’d much rather see a hunter have a range finder, use it and be proficient with it, than have a hunter not use a range finder, arrow a deer and not be able to recover it.

For more information, go to http://www.frankpearson.com.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Frank Pearson Says to Always Have Your Bow Tuned

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


How to Select the Correct Arrow – Q&A with PSE’s Bobby V


Bobby V explains how to select to correct Carbon Force Arrow. To get more information or opinions of PSE bows, go to http://www.facebook.com/OfficialPSEArchery.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


AXE 6 vs Dream Season EVO – Q & A with PSE’s Bobby Vargas


What is the difference between the Axe 6 & Dream Season EVO? Both use the Axe cam & both IBO @ 345fps. Both are the same ATA…But the EVO is alot more expensive….Which is better? To get more information or opinions of PSE bows, go to http://www.facebook.com/OfficialPSEArchery.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Frank Pearson Says that Even with a Peep Sight You Still Can Miss a Target


PSE's Frank Pearson

PSE’s Frank Pearson



Editor’s Note:
If you don’t understand the relationship of a peep sight to a bow sight, you can drastically miss the target, even if you can see the bow sight through the peep sight. This is a common mistake that both bowhunters and target archers make, and it’s a problem that Frank Pearson will teach us to overcome today.

Pearson explains, “You have to remember that a peep sight isn’t just a device to enable the archer to look through the string on the bow. Instead, it functions exactly like the rear sight of a rifle. To shoot accurately, you have to make sure that the front pin that you’re aiming with is lined up exactly in the center of the peep sight. Many bowhunters and tournament archers look through the hole in the peep sight. When they see the pin, they want to use it to aim with in that peep sight and release the arrow. Many times, a shooter doesn’t look to see if that front sight is lined up perfectly in the center of the peep sight. The front sight may appear to be at the top of the peep sight, at the bottom of the peep sight or more to the left or the right of the peep sight. Often shooters don’t take the time required to make sure that that front sight is in the very center of the peep sight.

“For instance, if the front sight is at the top of your peep sight instead of dead center, you’ll miss as badly as you will miss if the front sight on your rifle is at the very top of the rifle sight. Many bowhunters, when they miss the buck or the elk of a lifetime, don’t even see it through the peep sight. Instead they see that big animal and put the pin they want to use on the spot they want to hit and forget about looking through the peep sight. So, even though they put the pin on the spot they want to hit, if they forget to look through the peep sight, they’ll miss the animal. At the Frank Pearson School of Archery, I drill into my students the idea of having a shot routine, where you always take the shot by the numbers you’ve written out and walk you through making the perfect shot. Lining up the front sight and the peep sight is one of the steps of your shot routine. Then, regardless of the target or the distance, you have the best chance of making the most accurate shot you can make.

“Here’s a drill you can try at home. Aim at the center ring of the target you’re going to shoot, put the front sight at the very top of your peep sight, and then release the arrow. With your next arrow, aim at the center of the target, put the front sight at the bottom of your peep sight and release the arrow. Follow the same drill, by putting the front sight on the left and then the right side of your peep sight. Then with your final shot, put the front sight dead center on your peep sight, and release the arrow. If you repeat this same drill at different distances, you’ll quickly see and understand how important lining up the front sight in the center of the peep sight every time you take a shot is and how that process increases your accuracy.

Next week, Frank Pearson will give us some more shooting tips and explain why there’s no such term as, “target panic,” one of the most feared diseases of both bowhunters and target archers. Pearson will give you the remedy.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Which fletching should I use? – Q & A with PSE’s Bobby V


PSE’s Bobby Vargas answers the question; Which fletching should I use? To see other’s opinions on the question, go to our Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/OfficialPSEArchery.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Frank Pearson Says When You’re at the Top Why Go Back to the Bottom


PSE's Frank Pearson

PSE’s Frank Pearson

Editor’s Note: Frank and Becky Pearson had climbed to the top of the competitive archery world and shot and worked for several archery companies. They were more or less retired. Although Frank Pearson was burned out on professional archery, he still enjoyed attending tournaments and shooting with and helping amateurs learn how to shoot better.

Frank Pearson says, “When Pete Shepley asked Becky and me to start shooting PSE bows competitively again, I said, ‘I’ll only return to competitive archery, if you’ll let me shoot with the people who buy bows, not the ones to whom manufacturers give bows. I believe we can help PSE more by shooting in the non-pro division of archery, because the people we’re shooting with and against will be the people who actually buy PSE bows. I feel that by being a representative for PSE, my wife and I can serve PSE customers better by learning the problems they have at the tournaments we attend. When we were shooting with the pros every week, mostly what we heard were the professionals whining about the companies they represented. They hardly ever talked about how the equipment might need to be modified to make it shoot better or easier. But, when we shoot with the amateurs, we learn about the problems they have in shooting their bows.

“Too, many of them have the same problem that the president of PSE Pete Shepley had when I met with him and coached him on how to shoot better. I can help those amateurs learn how to shoot better, and I really like the feeling I get when I help people solve archery problems and shoot their bows better than they were shooting when they met me. Pete’s problem, which is the same problem many archers have, was that he’d pull the bow back and not give himself time to collect his thoughts before he released the arrow. I believe that one of the most important elements to shooting accurately, whether you’re a bowhunter, a target archer or just enjoy shooting the bow in the backyard, is to develop a shot routine.”

Pearson believes that developing a good shot routine is one of the most critical elements to shooting accurately. But, the way you learn, practice and develop your shot routine is even more important than having a shot routine. As Pearson explains, “For instance, if you’re going to go to the store to buy four or five items, you’ve numbered each one of those items and written each item down beside the number, and then when you reach the store, you’ve forgotten your list, you probably can remember five or so of the items, if you had eight items on your original list, because you’d numbered those items. However, if you haven’t made a list, then when you get to the store, you may not remember any of the items that you’ve planned to buy or perhaps very few. So, I believe that writing down each step on a piece of paper that you have to complete before you release the arrow is the best way to learn a shot routine and to imprint that shot routine into your brain. Then you’ll know exactly what to do when the time comes to take the shot.”

Although writing down your shot routine may seem to be over simplistic, this technique helped Pete Shepley shoot accurately when he faced dangerous game. This routine has helped bowhunters deliver the arrow to the spot on the animal where they’re aiming, and it’s helped target archers shoot their best scores.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Frank Pearson Says that Even with a Peep Sight You Still Can Miss a Target

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Hybrid Cam Orientation – Q & A with PSE’s Bobby V


Bobby explains how to check the orientation of the cams on PSE’s Hybrid Cam bows and fix it if it’s off. To get more information or opinions of PSE bows, go to http://www.facebook.com/OfficialPSEArchery.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


The Phone Call from PSE That Brought Frank Pearson Back into Archery


PSE's Frank Pearson

PSE’s Frank Pearson

Editor’s Note: There are many reasons for shooting archery, and the reasons often change, the longer you’re in the sport. For some, archery offers an opportunity to have a longer hunting season and be able to take more game than the hunters who use a gun can take. Others like the competitive aspect that the sport offers, through a wide variety of various types of competition. Some outdoorsmen enjoy the continuing challenge of being able to hold their bows straight, using the proper form and developing the muscle memory to shoot accurately every time they pull their bows. For the more mechanical minded, archery offers the tools to continue to refine every piece of archery equipment, so that when the sportsman releases the arrow, he or she knows the exact spot in the center ring or on the animal he’s hunting that the arrow will hit. Others want to learn enough about the sport of archery and the equipment to help someone who never has shot a bow before or only has limited experience with a bow to become all they can be in archery. Frank Pierson has found that his ultimate love of archery comes from being able to teach archery teachers and coach some of the best archers in the world.

Pearson explains, “I was sitting outside the house one day, and the phone rang. On the other end of the line was Pete Shepley. He was having some problems with shooting his bow and was preparing to go to Africa, to hunt one of those animals that could kill him. He asked if I would come down to his place and see if I could help him solve his shooting problems. After we got his shooting problem solved, Pete asked, ‘Have you tried out any of our new bows?’ I confessed and told him that I hadn’t, but that if he would give me a decent deal, I’d try one of them. Pete took me into the engineering department of PSE and introduced me to everyone in there. I explained to Pete that I wanted a new bow for me and one for my wife, and the next thing I knew, I was back shooting for PSE again. I never did find out exactly what Pete was going to Africa to hunt, but that was some years ago. Today, my wife and I shoot for PSE, and I go down and play around in PSE’s engineering department a couple of times a week. I don’t work for the engineering department, but I just sort of hang out there and am a kind of a pain in the butt to them.”

After coaching Shepley, Pearson realized that the real love of his life was teaching archery and created the Frank Pearson School of Archery (www.frankpearson.com) in St. David, Arizona, which is close to Tombstone and about 55 miles from Tucson. Today he’s taught archery all across the U.S. and many countries in the world. “I taught my wife how to shoot the bow in 1979, and she’s been ranked as the number 1 female pro in the country about 15 times. Since we’ve started back shooting in the amateur division, she’s won Shooter of the Year for the last 3 years. Right now, she and I both are shooting the Supra.”

Tomorrow: PSE’s Frank Pearson Says When You’re at the Top, Why Go Back to the Bottom

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Frank Pearson Became an Archery Pro in 1966


PSE's Frank Pearson

PSE’s Frank Pearson

Editor’s Note: Through a strange quirk of fate, Frank Pearson became an archery pro in 1966. He would have liked to compete in the Olympic Games, but becoming a winner foiled that opportunity.

Pearson explains, “I became a professional archer in 1966. That’s when I bought an archery sight and started shooting a recurve bow with a sight on it. The sight worked out pretty good for me. I won the first national event in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, at the NAA (National Archery Association) Indoor Nationals. Back in the 1960s, I had a drag racing car and won some money racing my car, which eliminated any chance I might have had of competing in archery in the Olympic Games. When I learned that the money I’d won in drag racing prevented me from being an amateur athlete in the Olympics, I decided to join the Professional Archery Association. I shot numbers of indoor tournaments to start with, and then in 1968 and 1969, I started shooting outdoor tournaments. I felt that the outdoor tournaments were more challenging, because you had to learn to deal with the wind and other elements outdoors, that you didn’t have to deal with indoors. At that time, I was shooting a Wing recurve bow.”

Somewhere between 1974 and 1975, the Wing Bow Company developed a compound bow. So, Pearson decided to start trying to shoot this device but didn’t like it very much. He got hurt several times when the bow came apart. Pearson recalls, “In those early days, the Wing compound bow had four wheels on it and an idler wheel on the limb of the bow, about halfway down the bow. When that bow malfunctioned, the wheel came down and hit me in the wrist. Then I couldn’t shoot my bow for a long time. When I finally came back and started shooting competitively again, I changed bow companies. I started shooting a Damon Howatt bow. The company at that time made recurve bows and hunting bows. I was shooting a Damon Howatt recurve against archers who were shooting compound bows, and I had a couple of major wins. I think that the major reason that I was able to win was because I didn’t really believe that the fellow shooting the compound bow could beat me. And, as most archers know, confidence is the key ingredient necessary to good shooting. I’ve also learned that when you’re younger, you’re much more cocky than you are when you’re older. Being cocky and full of self-confidence, you can get away with stuff that you can’t when you get older.

“Then in 1975, I won a tournament in Watkins Glen, New York, shooting my Damon Howatt Recurve, against the newer compound bows. Shortly after that, a new company out of Tucson, Arizona, named Precision Archery Equipment (PSE) approached me. Pete Shepley, the creator of PSE, had gotten word that I’d beaten the compound bow shooters with my old recurve bow. He asked me if I’d be interested in shooting one of those new compound bows. I said I would, and they sent me one.” Two months after Pearson received his new compound bow, he took the new bow, competed in the outdoor nationals and placed third with his new PSE bow. According to Pearson, “This PSE bow was also a four wheel bow, but it didn’t come apart like the first four wheel bow I’d had did. So, I decided this PSE compound was a pretty good bow. To be honest, one of the reasons I started shooting the compound bow instead of staying with the recurve was that the compound bow manufacturers were the ones who invested money in tournament shooters. I needed the money to get to tournaments and return home. Back then, I was a welder by profession. I was helping to build armored cars in Philadelphia, and I didn’t make enough money to pay my way to archery tournaments. I shot for PSE for a pretty good while.

“But, then I got a job with a company that today is called Outers that makes gun cleaning supplies. Outers bought Astro Archery Company and hired me to run their limb production company in Wisconsin. I worked for there from 1976 to 1977, before Outers sold out the archery department to a company in Canada. I didn’t want to move to Canada. Pete Shepley offered me a job working in Illinois, where I worked for PSE for about 6 months. Then Pete asked me if I’d like to have the job of running the limb department for PSE archery in Tucson, Arizona. I drove to Tucson, checked the place out, told Pete I’d love to have the job and started working for PSE in the limb department in 1978. I worked for PSE for 8 years, then I left the company and went to work for a couple of other archery companies for the next 20 years or so. My wife and I got fed up with professional archery and more or less retired from competition shooting.”

From the work history of Frank Pearson, you can see how much knowledge he’s acquired from working with so many different bow companies and so many professional archers over such a long time. He was in research and development and building limbs, shooting competitively and doing public relations. Pearson saw the evolution of the bow from the longbow all the way up to today’s modern bows. He’d been so involved in the world of competitive archery that he was more or less burned out and decided to only participate in fun shoots on the weekends. But, then, the phone rang one day.

Tomorrow: The Phone Call from PSE That Brought Frank Pearson Back into Archery

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


PSE’s Frank Pearson’s Archery Teaching Career and he has Learned


PSE's Frank Pearson

PSE’s Frank Pearson

Editor’s Note: When we asked Frank Pearson of Vail, Arizona, what he did for PSE, he said, “I’m a pain for the engineering department at PSE and Pete Shepley’s archery coach.” When we asked Pearson how he got to be Pete Shepley’s archery coach, Pearson explained, “Pete was going out to Africa to try and kill one of those things that could kill him. He asked me to coach him on his bow shooting technique, so he could be as accurate as possible when he had to face that critter that could kill him.” Pearson has lived through and competed in the Golden Age of Archery – starting to shoot archery in 1949 with his first bow, a longbow.

Throughout the years, 71 year old Frank Pearson has been a critical part of the research and development for many of the new and modern PSE bows we’re shooting today. But, he’s also competed in and won some of the most prestigious archery programs in the nation, shooting at the highest level of archery. After becoming the pro of the archery pros, Pearson decided to step back and shoot on the amateur level, not because he had to, but because that’s what he chose. Today he owns and operates the Frank Pearson School of Archery (www.frankpearson.com), and has trained thousands of bow shop owners and the heads of bow departments in major sporting good stores all over the country how to set up bows and teach archery to their clients who come in to buy archery equipment.

As Pearson explains, “I started off shooting a York longbow and wooden arrows that my neighbor gave me and taught me how to use them. I hunted with that longbow.” Back in those days, Pearson’s longbow was used primarily for food gathering and he even took a deer in New Jersey at about 8 yards. “Back then, we didn’t have sights, and I think that the sight is the worst thing that’s ever happened to archery,” Pearson explains. “I equate bowhunters using sights to the PGA (Professional Golf Association) allowing golfers to use balls that easily can be hit 400 yards. If golfers had balls that would travel 400 yards, then many nice golf courses would be obsolete. When the sight was added to the bow, just about every form of archery competition at that time was eliminated.”

According to Pearson, because the sight eliminated the archer’s need to accurately and instinctively calculate the flight of the arrow to the target, all the skill set that was required to be an accurate archer at that time was eliminated. With the longbow, there was a marriage between the archer and the bow and their ability to work together as one unit. But, when a sight was put on the bow, all the muscle memory and the instant calculation of distance and arrow flight that took place in an archer’s mind, was no longer necessary. “When outdoorsmen only had the longbow, I saw some really great archers in competition shooting,” Pearson recalls. “One of the most amazing archers back then was Howard Hill. If you go back and read about him or look at some of his archery videos, I think you’ll be just as impressed today as I was back then. During my youth, I’d shoot 100 arrows a day, just like Howard Hill, Fred Bear and Ben Pearson.”

Frank Pearson hunted mostly rabbits and deer, but he also duck hunted and pheasant hunted with his bow, and no, he didn’t ground pound (shoot the pheasants on the ground or shoot ducks sitting on the water). Pearson remembers that, “I often shot one or two ducks on my way to school. Back then, the most dominant duck where I lived was the black duck. The school nurse would let me put the ducks in her refrigerator until school ended for the day. Then I’d take the ducks home and clean them. If you could shoot a black duck when he jumped off the water, you could shoot a pheasant just as easily, because they had the same flight pattern. When a duck jumps off the water or a pheasant jumps into the air, they usually jump about 8 feet high, before they start to fly. Generally they’ll almost stall out for about 2 or 3 seconds, (stop in mid air) before they start to fly in a certain direction. I’ve watched movies of Fred Bear shooting pheasants out of the air with a longbow. He always took the shot at about 8 feet off the ground, when the pheasant changed direction, from going straight up, to flying parallel with the ground. That’s the same technique I used to shoot pheasants and ducks as a boy. I didn’t know anybody else in my group of friends who hunted this way, because they all had shotguns. But, I just loved to shoot arrows, and I practiced constantly.” Pearson explained that as long as he didn’t have a sight on his bow he could shoot accurately at almost any distance. “With a sight, you have to know the exact distance you are from the target. When you shoot the longbow, you just pull the bow back, visualize the projection of the arrow and turn the bow loose. I got pretty proficient with my longbow out to 50 and 60 yards. Back then, I was using a Bear Razorhead broadhead.”

But, as changes to the archery industry came about, Frank Pearson didn’t fight the changes; he embraced them and became a part of the evolving archery industry.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Frank Pearson Became an Archery Pro in 1966

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Christopher Perkins wins Redding Western Trail Shoot!


Christoper Perkins

Christoper Perkins wins Redding!

Team PSE Staff Shooter Christopher Perkins dominated the 2012 Redding Western Trail Shoot with a 1st place win with his PSE Dominator Pro!

Christoper Perkins

Christoper Perkins and his Dominator!

The NFAA Redding Western Trail Shoot was held May 5-6, 2012 in Redding, California.

Christoper Perkins

Christoper Perkins

Congratulations Chris on your win!!

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Why Ronnie “Cuz” Strickland Shoots PSE Bows


Ronnie “Cuz” Strickland - Senior VP of Mossy Oak

Ronnie “Cuz” Strickland – Senior VP of Mossy Oak

Editor’s Note: Ronnie “Cuz” Strickland, the senior vice president of Mossy Oak and a member of PSE’s Pro Staff, has not only taken turkeys with a bow, but he’s filmed many other hunters taking turkeys with their bows for the Mossy Oak TV shows. Strickland is in charge of Mossy Oak Video Production and TV shows and has trained most of the Mossy Oak cameramen and producers. When you’re considering filming a bowhunt for turkey, Strickland knows all the mistakes that most people make, because he’d made those same mistakes. For 43 years, Strickland has had a camera in his hands almost every time he’s been in the woods.

“I’m often asked why I’ve decided to become a PSE Pro Staffer,’ Ronnie Strickland says. “Most people don’t know that I was a salesman in a sporting goods store, long before I ever picked up a video camera. The first PSE bow I ever got, I think was a Mach 4. I kept noticing that Pete Shepley and PSE always seemed to be ahead of the curve for new innovations in bows. Back in the old days, we would continue to make adjustments to our arrows to try and make them lighter, because the bows just didn’t have the speed that they have today. Then suddenly, PSE came out with an overdraw bow, and we could shoot arrows 23, 24 and 25 inches long. Now, you don’t have to be a rocket scientist to know that the faster the arrow is flying, the better your chances are of hitting the target, even if you’ve misjudged the distance a little bit. But, Pete Shepley figured that out and came out with that series of Mach bows with overdraws, and that’s when my love affair with PSE really started. I felt like Pete Shepley was a hunter first, and an engineer second, and the combination of being both kept Pete and PSE in front of the pack.

“I always felt like my PSE bow was like the first Dodge truck I ever bought. I got way more for my money than I expected to get. The first PSE bows I bought were steady and fast, and they held together well. I always knew I got good value for the dollars I spent for a PSE bow. I normally won’t join anybody’s pro staff or endorse products. But, I’ve been using PSE bows forever, and I know I’ll continue to use them. Blake Shelby, the marketing director for PSE, got his first job out of college working for Mossy Oak. After Blake took his job with PSE, he’d call me, and I’d do some interviews with him. Finally, one day he said, ‘Cuz, you need to be on PSE’s Pro Staff.’ I said, ‘Sign me up; I’ve already got PSE bows and I know a lot about PSE from selling their bows many years ago and from shooting their bows.’ Being a PSE Pro Staffer is a good fit for me. Right now, I’m shooting the Brute X Deer Thug Single Cam Bow, which is new, and I have the bow set on 60 pounds. This bow comes fully loaded and ready to go and will be sold exclusively at Dick’s Sporting Goods. The bow sells for less than $500 and is complete with everything but the arrows. You get a sight, a quiver, a stabilizer, a wrist sling and a Whisker Biscuit arrow rest. I really like the single cam technology of this bow. For me, living in the South, bowhunting is about how close you can get to the deer and get off a shot, not about how far I can shoot accurately. So, I set my bow up to take a deer at 20 yards or less. I really like that smooth, quiet delivery of the arrow that I get from a single cam bow.”

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


If Your Bowhunting Video Doesn’t Have Quality Sound, the Video Won’t Be as Good – Ronnie “Cuz” Strickland


Ronnie “Cuz” Strickland - Senior VP of Mossy Oak

Ronnie “Cuz” Strickland – Senior VP of Mossy Oak

Editor’s Note: Ronnie “Cuz” Strickland, the senior vice president of Mossy Oak and a member of PSE’s Pro Staff, has not only taken turkeys with a bow, but he’s filmed many other hunters taking turkeys with their bows for the Mossy Oak TV shows. Strickland is in charge of Mossy Oak Video Production and TV shows and has trained most of the Mossy Oak cameramen and producers. When you’re considering filming a bowhunt for turkey, Strickland knows all the mistakes that most people make, because he’d made those same mistakes. For 43 years, Strickland has had a camera in his hands almost every time he’s been in the woods.

“I have a sign in each of the edit rooms here at Mossy Oak that says, ‘If it doesn’t sound good, it doesn’t look good,’” Ronnie Strickland reports. “Many times when people want to video their hunts, they’re all consumed with the idea of getting the hunter taking the shot and the animal taking the arrow. The last thing they think about is the quality of the sound. But, I believe the sound is just as important, if not more important, than the video itself. If people will be talking in the video, you’ve either got to get within 2 feet of the person talking (if you have a built in mic), or you’ll have to invest in wireless mics. Notice I said the word, “mics,” plural instead of “a mic” singular. Many people concentrate so much on video and so little on audio that they don’t produce a good bowhunting video. Imagine going to a movie in a movie theater, and the movie has a bad, irritating sound. If you’ve ever been to a movie like this, you know you’ll have a tough time listening to what’s happening, even though you can see what’s happening.

“Video cameras have gotten so good and so simple, that I think I can train a monkey to shoot one. Everything is so automatic on today’s cameras that once you get the camera set up, all you have to do is push the button to shoot the video. The only way to make sure that you get good sound on your videos is to wear a set of headphones. If you’re touching the camera, and you can hear a scuffing sound every time you touch the camera, then you can fix that problem right then. If every time your hunter moves his head, you hear a scratching sound, then you’ve got to fix your wind screen, buy a wind screen or move the mic, so that when the hunter turns his head, he doesn’t brush the head of the mic.

“We use two different types of microphones when we’re filming. One mic is called a net mic, and it’s unidirectional, which means it picks up sounds from all directions. We have a 15 foot cord for it, so we can set it out on the ground. So, that’s one channel input that’s picking up great sounds, like a turkey gobbling or a deer walking through the leaves, or ducks quacking as they’re coming in over a beaver pond. Then, we put a wireless mic on the hunter himself, so he can talk during the hunt. The cameraman wears headphones, and I’ll put one of the headphones in my ear and the other headphone above my ear to enable me to still hear all the natural sounds. I’m convinced that to get really good audio, you’ve got to have a camera that has two mic inputs, so that you can hear the hunter and the viewer can hear everything else going on around the hunter.”

Tomorrow: Why Ronnie Strickland Shoots PSE Bows

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Learn How to Hide on the Hunt – Ronnie “Cuz” Strickland


Ronnie “Cuz” Strickland - Senior VP of Mossy Oak

Ronnie “Cuz” Strickland – Senior VP of Mossy Oak

Editor’s Note: Ronnie “Cuz” Strickland, the senior vice president of Mossy Oak and a member of PSE’s Pro Staff, has not only taken turkeys with a bow, but he’s filmed many other hunters taking turkeys with their bows for the Mossy Oak TV shows. Strickland is in charge of Mossy Oak Video Production and TV shows and has trained most of the Mossy Oak cameramen and producers. When you’re considering filming a bowhunt for turkey, Strickland knows all the mistakes that most people make, because he’d made those same mistakes. For 43 years, Strickland has had a camera in his hands almost every time he’s been in the woods.

“Another big mistake that many people often make when taping a hunt is that the cameraman may not hide as well as he should,” Ronnie Strickland explains. “Hunting with a cameraman, means twice the amount of noise and twice the amount of scent, and you’re twice as likely to spook the game as you will be if you’re hunting by yourself. This reason, is why, when we’re hunting or filming, we cover everything but the camera lens with Mossy Oak camouflage. We even cover the tripod legs, and we take extra head nets and gloves with us to be prepared if someone loses one. We always try to take a stand in the shade, which is very important, because as I’ve mentioned, the only thing we don’t have covered with Mossy Oak is our camera lens. If the sun hits that camera lens and a deer or a turkey sees the reflection of the sun on the lens, that animal will spook and get out of there. But, there’s no way to cover up the camera lens or to camouflage it.

“When I say you need to hide better, many people think about camouflage and brushing up in front of themselves. But, if you’re hunting from a tree stand, back cover is often far more important than front cover. If you’re silhouetted in a tree stand, an animal can pick you out just as easily as if you’re walking the top of a ridge with no trees in front of you or behind you. I always carry bungee cords with me, pruners and a folding saw. Many times when I get into a tree, I’ll cut brush or limbs and bungee those limbs behind me to make sure I’ve got my silhouette covered behind me. Now, sometimes I may pick a tree to put my tree stand in that doesn’t have any cover. Then I’ll cut a few bushes or limbs, tie them onto a pull up rope and pull that brush up in a tree with me. You’ve got to break up that human silhouette, and the person shooting the video camera has to be hidden as well as the shooter, if not better. So, when you look at a potential ground blind site or tree stand site to video a hunt, before you ever set up, decide what you’ll have to do to make sure the animal can’t see you and make sure you can shoot the video you want to shoot.”

Tomorrow: Ronnie Strickland Says If Your Bowhunting Video Doesn’t Have Quality Sound, the Video Won’t Be as Good

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and hunting accessories, click here.


Don’t Forget to Tell the Story of your Hunt – Ronnie “Cuz” Strickland


Ronnie “Cuz” Strickland - Senior VP of Mossy Oak

Ronnie “Cuz” Strickland – Senior VP of Mossy Oak

Editor’s Note: Ronnie “Cuz” Strickland, the senior vice president of Mossy Oak and a member of PSE’s Pro Staff, has not only taken turkeys with a bow, but he’s filmed many other hunters taking turkeys with their bows for the Mossy Oak TV shows. Strickland is in charge of Mossy Oak Video Production and TV shows and has trained most of the Mossy Oak cameramen and producers. When you’re considering filming a bowhunt for turkey, Strickland knows all the mistakes that most people make, because he’d made those same mistakes. For 43 years, Strickland has had a camera in his hands almost every time he’s been in the woods.

According to Ronnie Strickland, “One of the biggest mistakes most people make when trying to film any hunt is they don’t shoot enough footage. Everyone has gotten really good at filming the animal on impact. But, they forget to tell the story of the hunt. I want to know who the hunter is, how he got to the hunt, where the hunt is taking place, what kind of equipment he’s using, how he’s getting into his stand or blind, and all the elements of the hunt, besides just the animal taking the arrow. The least expensive part of the hunt is pushing the record button on the camera. Most people tend to turn the video camera on just before the hunt’s about to end. If you follow TV ratings, on all the TV shows on all the outdoor channels, the shows that are rated unbelievably high, are shows like “The Deadliest Catch,” “Swamp People” and other shows that tell stories of adventure. All these shows have main characters, and the shows tell stories about these people. They don’t just show crabs coming out of a crab pot or an alligator getting shot. Therefore, I feel that the number one mistake that people make when they’re trying to film their hunts is that they don’t shoot enough video to properly tell the story.

“Remember, the video camera just replaces the pen and paper that most story tellers used for writing. So, the viewer, who has replaced the reader, wants you to tell him the story of the hunt as well as show him what it is like when the animal takes the arrow. An author, when he writes a great novel or a great story, paints visual images of the story unfolding in the reader’s mind. With a video camera, you don’t have to imagine how the story unfolds, as the story progresses. You should be able to visually see that story that you once only have imagined. One of the things that great story tellers do is that they answer all the questions that readers may ask before the reader has to ask the question. Oftentimes, we assume that the viewer of a video knows what we’re talking about in the video. However, you never want the viewer to have to assume where the story is taking place, why you’re at this particular place on that particular hunting site, why you’ve chosen the tree you’re hunting from, and where on the ground you’re hunting. You don’t want them to assume that you’ve scouted the area; you want to tell them that you’ve scouted the area, why you’ve picked that particular site, and why you have reason to believe that animal is there. Remember, once you shoot the deer or the turkey, the story is pretty much over. So, whether you’re shooting video for you and your family or friends, or you’re shooting it for YouTube, your own webpage or for a TV show, shoot enough footage to tell the story.”

Tomorrow: PSE Pro Staffer Ronnie Strickland Explains You Need to Learn How to Hide

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